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What's the worst experience you have experienced with type 1???

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by Dzialo, Apr 17, 2014.

  1. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    Our generation thanks to the internet can now discuss so much moreand realise that Professionals just have theory training in a specific year to base their judgements on for their entire working lifes...

    I hate the state of my teeth because my mum didnt get a 2nd opinion on them 40 years ago. She says.. " but we never question gp's or dentists, they've done special training to learn.."

    Parents never used to question anything a gp or dentist said, now thanks to media and internet we can get better advice, opinions and diagnosis etc


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  2. DonnaC-T

    DonnaC-T Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Mine was diagnosis too. I went to the doctors as I felt ill, told to go to hospital- doctor arranged it so they were expecting me. I phoned my bf (now ex) to ask if he could take me he moaned that he was eating his tea. So we went two hours later!
    Then he didn't stay very long, I was so scared. They took blood gases which was horrid.
    When I got a consultant, I explained I couldn't do jabs as I was scared of needles - I was used to seeing them as my brother had been diagnosed 8minths before.
    He said fine, I'll be back with an alternative within half an hour. He bought me back a phone number of a solicitor who could help my write a will!
    It worked though, I was soon injecting that orange. X
     
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  3. lizdeluz

    lizdeluz Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hmm! If I could, I'd write a special textbook on psychology for these diabetes consultants! I hope someone will do it.
     
  4. KKILL

    KKILL Type 1 · Newbie

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    Hi, My worst hypo was on a railway station platform. I started fitting as the train was arriving. My wife still tells me she should have pushed instead of pulling me from the edge of the platform for being so stupid. Was ok after a trip to a&e. Scary.

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  5. Dzialo

    Dzialo · Well-Known Member

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    Stay away from your wife:);)
     
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  6. naillig

    naillig Type 1 · Member

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  7. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Probably diagnosis for me as well at the age of 8.. The family GP at the time was an arrogant alcoholic or possibly a morphine addict who tried to fob my mum off though i was pretty much dying on my feet by this time..
    So i taken round the kids ward & stuck on a drip..

    I stick my neck out with the GP accusation reflecting on this in hindsight regarding my memories of that experience because i hit the skids a few years back when i got involved with a habitual drug user.. An "Amy Winehouse type" that was partial to anything, including morphine. I looked worse than her by the end of it & i was only trying to get her off the stuff....
    I cut loose in the end, but not before i had to beg the girl to give me my insulin back which was swiped from my bag on departure.. God knows what she would have done if she'd grabbed the pen....
     
    #47 Jaylee, Apr 27, 2014 at 6:13 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 27, 2014
  8. O'Connor97

    O'Connor97 Type 1 · Newbie

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    DKA I couldnt see anything when it happened. I got taken into hospital, I was in hospital for approximately 2 weeks, I was in a coma for at least 4 days. I was lucky enough to be able to hear things that were happening around me butbwas not able to move it was horrible. Once I woke up from the coma I needed the toilet, my dad was with me, I went to walk to the toilet and collapsed straight to the floor.
     
  9. 2131tom

    2131tom Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Sounds an appalling experience at the hands of some very unprofessional 'healthcarers'.

    If it's any comfort to you though, the two people concerned probably caught your Norovirus. It's a very infectious virus and can easily be caught through aerosols, let alone direct contact with vomit (sorry!). The other problem is that there's very little immunity conferred by catching it, which means you can get it more than once in quite a short time.
     
  10. C burns

    C burns · Well-Known Member

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    Rather than sharing my worst, il share my best getting my insulin pump. . . Best experience ever! I can now manage exercise, eating out, drinking alcohol, blah blah blah! I was at rock bottom swinging from bg levels of 2 at bed time to 36 at 3am n it was a vicious circle, now I range between 5-7 if I go above 7 I get symptoms of being high


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  11. Chloe jade

    Chloe jade Parent · Member

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    My daughter has diabetes type 1... Only 3 weeks ago she was in bed and started screaming.. I ran up the stairs and all I can explain it as, she looked like something was inside her!! She couldn't see, hear and was jumping every minute.. Has anyone else that is older to describe what she was feeling as she is only young.. Can she remember what happened??
     
  12. Spiker

    Spiker Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Was she having a fit? That can happen in severe hypos. How old is she?

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  13. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    What action did you take?
     
  14. Chloe jade

    Chloe jade Parent · Member

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    It wasn't a fit, her blood was 1.2... Before she went bed it was 9... It dropped In the space ov 30mins
     
  15. Chloe jade

    Chloe jade Parent · Member

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    She is 2 years old nearly 3 she was diagnosed in September so it's new to is both!! Her blood was 1.2 but when I put her bed it was 9.. It dropped in the space ov 30mins!!
     
  16. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    Your daughter is inlikely to really remember it. Its a severe hypo at 1.2 and she may have a vague sort of mind memory of it but especially when sleeping with a severe hypo like that then its not going to be a full vivd memory. She may feel grotty or tired after but not all people feel like this, I never have in 30 years of having diabetes.

    To be honest I've always said to people around me like hubby, my mum or friends that if ever I get a severe hypo then it will be worse for them dealing with it than for me having it. That is true for me and I suspect your daughter too. It is horrible to have to deal with a severe hypo with your child.

    Have you established a reason for your daughter dropping so quick?


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  17. Spiker

    Spiker Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Based on the BG and the sudden drop, that was definitely a severe hypo, and I believe what you saw was a fit. A fit is a common effect of a severe hypo. Not everyone gets them but they are common.

    It is a horrible thing to witness in a loved one. If it makes you feel any better, your daughter would have no memory of the fit, and she would not have been conscious at the time. She would not have experienced it, even at the time. The approach of a hypo, particularly such a rapid hypo, feels very scary to the person experiencing it, but hopefully as she was asleep she would not have experienced that either.

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  18. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    Also depending how severe, but I have always been able to respond to somebody talking to me and giving me instructions when having a severe hypo.

    Within a year of diagnosis (30 years ago) I had a severe hypo and ended up with 4 paramedics and a GP helping me. I knew they were trying to get an intravenous line in my hand despite being able to talk, I did lash out at the GP whacking him in the face!!! ( i hate intravenous drips for anything)...I don't recall it, just being told what I did afterwards.
    Saying that though, I was at the hospital a few weeks later and recognised one of the Paramedics that came out to me and spoke to him first. I hadnt given any thought at all to what actually happened to me as I didnt think I remembered anything.. But I did recognise the Paramedic.

    Children don't really gain memories and the ability to recall actual memories until after about 5'ish years of age.. They are learning life skills and survival skills up until then, so memories of places, days out, nappy changes, and even a severe hypo is not going to be recalled in later life unless you tell your child about their first severe hypo....






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  19. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    That is a big drop in such a short space of time, I would suggest you speak with her diabetes team if these hypo's are common place so that they can advise on adjusting her insulin.
     
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  20. ChloeAlisha

    ChloeAlisha Type 1 · Member

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    She might have had a severe hypo or hyper, sometimes they can cause fits, which sounds like what you've described x

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