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When did your insulin needs start to change?

Discussion in 'Pregnancy' started by Catherine4188, Jul 14, 2017.

  1. Catherine4188

    Catherine4188 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello all,

    I'm 16 weeks pregnant and only diagnosed type 1 about 26 weeks ago. My insulin needs haven't change at all yet, in fact my glargine has reduced by 10%. I was just wondering at what point did you find your insulin ratios increase? I'm still having regular lows and need to constantly eat fresh fruit with no insulin between meals to prevent hypos. My consultants have not treat someone in the same situation as me before (or so they say) so they say it's a bit of a guessing game as to if my needs will change much or at all as I am probably still honeymooning.

    Thanks for any replies.
     
  2. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    I don't remember exactly but it was around 18 or so weeks. The hypos eased off. Then in the early 20s of weeks, I saw noticeable increases in my insulin needs which became really apparent around 25 weeks.
     
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  3. hels

    hels Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hey Catherine, I was diagnosed with type 1 five years ago when about 6 months pregnant so although not quite the same circumstances it's quite similar as dealing with pregnancy and being newly diagnosed at the same time. I have since had a second child.
    Insulin requirements can be quite unpredictable particularly when pregnant. For me my insulin requirements reduced in early pregnancy then gradually increased from around 20 weeks. Everyone is different so it best to test lots and be prepared to adjust your insulin but do it gradually and get help from your diabetes team. If you are needing to eat to prevent hypos you may benefit from reducing your insulin slightly. Are you getting help with carb counting?
    I found it best to stick to foods that I knew the effect on my blood sugars. It is hard getting it right when he to diabetes and pregnant so just do the best you can and don't beat yourself up about highs/lows. I think because I was diagnosed when pregnant it has helped to give me good control now as I started off by being so strict with myself.
    I had sudden hypos at around 37 weeks on my first pregnancy and my induction was brought forward slightly. Then had to work it all out again once the babies were born! Just make sure you have hypo treatments to hand and keep in contact with your diabetes team.
    Congratulations and good luck!
     
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  4. Tilly_S

    Tilly_S Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I have been type one for 16 years and had two pregnancys in this time :) both times my doses havnt been raised they've been dropped dramatically due to awful hypos resulting in ambulances so you are not alone , usually it's around 20-25 weeks though xxx
     
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  5. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hey Catherine,

    I hope you have continues BG monitoring with a system that lets your and your consultant see the BG graphs, if not I think your consultant could make a strong case for the NHS to provide you with such a system at lease while pregnant. Maybe your regular lows would justify a pump as well.
     
  6. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    Every pregnant woman has hypos. Some get CGM, most don't.

    It's perfectly possible to have a good pregnancy without a pump and/or CGM as most pregnant women test frequently anyway.

    I'm sure the OP is aware of the options. Please stay on topic.
     
  7. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    It more:
    My consultants have not treat someone in the same situation as me before (or so they say) so they say it's a bit of a guessing game
    Therefore I would expect there to be benefit from remove as much guessing as possible.
     
  8. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    You misunderstand the "guessing". They're referring to pregnancy in someone recently diagnosed, and the possible honeymoon period. A pump wouldn't help with that. Moreover, other members have confirmed they've been in a simialr situation and have given their experience above, including being diagnosed during pregnancy.

    The pattern of placental IR should be similar, but even in ladies who've had Type 1 a long time, pregnancy can cause unusual results as Tilly has explained above.

    In addition, I believe the OP is using flash GM already.
     
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  9. Catherine4188

    Catherine4188 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the replies. I really appreciate it.

    I have spoken to my consultant about adjusting insulin ratios due to hypos but as my hour after readings are just right they didn't want to change it. The hypos happen when I don't eat for a while and I'm busy at work (teaching a practical subject). I eat fruit and it tides me over until the next meal or snack. I find it very hard to test every hour after food due to my job. But my results are always good and my control is great at the moment. I can eat pretty much what I want and just carb count.

    In the beginning due to extreme stress after loosing another baby at point of diagnosis I was injecting 45 mins or more before eating to stop spikes above 7.9 even within the first hour of eating. Needless to say it became impossible to keep up and I had lots of very severe hypos.
     
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  10. hboyt

    hboyt Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm Type 1 for over 20 years and 24 weeks pregnant. I've had to increase my insulin since my first appointment when pregnant at 5 weeks and insulin has increased every week since. Guess i must have very strong insulin resistance. Had a small amount of hypos at 20 weeks other than maintained a 6.3 HA1C. By the replies on this topic and the other ladies i chat to at my clinic is sounds everyones requirements increase/decrease at different stages....
    Wishing you good luck on your pregnancy journey :angelic::)
     
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