1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2021 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

When is the right time for insulin

Discussion in 'Type 1.5/LADA Diabetes' started by Millie74, Apr 17, 2021.

  1. Millie74

    Millie74 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    175
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    48
    This post really helps. Thank you.

    Lucozade to hand seems a good idea when teaching dance.

    I think I will need to self fund libre with my activity levels.
     
    #21 Millie74, Apr 18, 2021 at 8:55 AM
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 19, 2021
  2. KK123

    KK123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,916
    Likes Received:
    2,472
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Hi Milly, I would say just have a good read about Libre and its limitations. I do like it (it would cost a £100 a month to self fund). It is always around 15 minutes behind what your blood glucose is actually doing, ie, if I were to look at my libre reading now it would be telling me what my levels were 15 minutes ago. That's easy enough to calculate when you are going along but if you are hoping to use it for real time activities (ie, a dance class) then you would need to factor that in as your levels are likely to be changing rapidly in a high exercise routine). It is great for showing trends but again if I were to check now, it may show a down arrow meaning I was trending low....15 minutes ago. x
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Like Like x 1
  3. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,744
    Likes Received:
    2,368
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Look at the carb content on the lucozade carefully. They recently reformulated it to have less sugar and you may find that it is no longer the best hypo treatment.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,744
    Likes Received:
    2,368
    Trophy Points:
    198
    I haven't used the libre 2 so don't know how customisable the alarms are. I use a dexcom which is a similar system and it has its low alarm set to 4.4. It's usually pretty easy to catch a hypo in time.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  5. Swillbos

    Swillbos LADA · Active Member

    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    24
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Hi Milly,

    One very strong positive is that your exercise routine is predictable, ie. you know the timing (and presumably also the intensity?) of each class/block of classes in advance. Whatever insulin regime you start with, this is something you can plan around.

    I was on basal insulin (the long-acting one) only for the first 18months and have now been on bolus as well for the past four months. There is so much to take in when you first start out on insulin....you just about get your head round the fact that there are two types (oh and mixed for some people!) and then someone kindly points out that different insulins have different timing profiles ie they take effect over differing lengths of time (lots of graphs on the Web). For example I am on Humulin basal; as I understand it this is one of the older (cheaper) shorter-lived 'long-acting' insulins, and tends to peter out after c.16hrs, whereas others will give a full 24 hour coverage. I split my dose and take 8units at 8.30pm and 6units at 8.30am, logic being that I am much more active in the day than at night. I found David Cavan's book, 'Take control of Type 1 Diabetes' really helpful on this subject. I don't want to burden you with yet another thing to worry about, rather suggest that the timing and possibly splitting of basal doses might be a helpful tool in your armoury.

    A basal-only routine will be time-limited, but does have the benefit of simplicity and low likelihood of hypos. In those 18 months I only had one proper hypo, and really that was my own stupidity..... Your needs will be quite different because you do so much intense exercise. I would like to try a Libre sometime but can't justify the expense at the moment. In addition to my NHS strips, I do, however self-fund an Accu-chek cassette, which I find really helpful for testing when I am out walking, or (distant memory!!) out in town shopping/wining and dining. Lot less fiddly than strips, discrete and for some reason seems to need less blood - probably not an issue for you, but I often struggle to get a big enough blob for my test strips, and especially if I am feeling stressed about a potential hypo.

    Fingers crossed for you, it really is a marathon not a sprint!

    Susan x
     
    • Like Like x 2
  6. Mike d

    Mike d Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    7,999
    Likes Received:
    11,324
    Trophy Points:
    198
    They reduced sugars by 50% in 2017 and even further in 2018. Now it's not recommended for diabetics unless they're aware of that change.

    Good call EllieM
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Informative Informative x 1
  7. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    15,695
    Likes Received:
    11,633
    Trophy Points:
    298
    I've been in bands with other T1s bass players both, funny enough.
    They always keep it handy by the cab. As a singer when I feel it comming on. You just can't heve bits of food in your throat.
    Using your voice to teach. I'd call it a similar activity to public performance..

    I self fund my sensors. Have done for a couple of years. Though there is hope for me with NHS funding. recently had a CCd letter from my endo addressed to my GP recommending them prescribed.

    Hi Ellie,

    You are quite correct. I think the ingeredient change was done a fair while back.?
    It still works for me but then due to the fact I don't use insulin doses to chase larger amounts of carbs.
    I tend to only need a nominal amount to nudge me back in the zone.
    With gigs, if I drop. The "culprit" is clearly the basal. Coupled with activity & more insulin sensitivity in the evening..


    @Millie74 , you will work this out for yourself as you go along.
    I'm sure there will be many questions.

    I'll tag in @NicoleC1971 . Who does PT health stuff. (If I'm guessing right, she would be experienced dealing with classes as well as the "1 on 1.")
     
    • Like Like x 2
  8. KK123

    KK123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,916
    Likes Received:
    2,472
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Hi Ellie, no, I haven't used the libre 2 either but I'm hoping they will change me to it at some point, it would be much better with the alarms.
     
  9. Hertfordshiremum

    Hertfordshiremum · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    253
    Likes Received:
    118
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Hi I have just tried the Libre 2 and found it much more accurate than previous Libre and both alarms worked extremely well and woke me up at night. Excellent. I would recommend.
     
    • Like Like x 3
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
  10. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    15,695
    Likes Received:
    11,633
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Yep, I have to admit with the L2 I have found less need to calibrate with the app I use. If at all.
    I tend not to use the alarms. Fully hypo awair. It's more like the speedo gauge on a car for me an at a glance correction, making sure I don't break the "limit."
     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. Millie74

    Millie74 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    175
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Thank you. Does sound like a marathon. So do you think that I could get away without purchasing the libre yet?

    I really prefer the sound of long acting only first. I hope this might be suggested.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    #31 Millie74, Apr 18, 2021 at 11:19 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 19, 2021
  12. Millie74

    Millie74 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    175
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    48
    In
    Interesting. Thank you. Teaching my classes is my biggest concern.

    £100 a month is a lot. Depends how long would have to self fund for.
     
    #32 Millie74, Apr 18, 2021 at 11:23 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 19, 2021
  13. Millie74

    Millie74 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    175
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Thanks for the information. It’s a shame it is do hard to get on prescription. It may be worth funding though. I can imagine if I do, I wouldn’t want to go back to finger pricking.
     
    #33 Millie74, Apr 18, 2021 at 11:39 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 19, 2021
  14. Millie74

    Millie74 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    175
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Thank you. Good advice. So it’s ok to carry on low carbing with insulin. As in not dangerous? But low carbing without insulin and LADA can be?
     
    #34 Millie74, Apr 18, 2021 at 11:42 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 19, 2021
  15. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,744
    Likes Received:
    2,368
    Trophy Points:
    198
    It's not as bad as you think. I had to stop using the libre after a year when I became allergic to the sensors (and they not only gave me a rash but the readings lost any relation to those on my glucometer). I ended up testing about 8 times a day (before meals, bed, before and during exercise etc) but quickly got used to it. Now I self fund my dexcom, which seems like a real luxury compared to the libre 1 (alarms plus I've managed to get my redings to transmit to a watch), but I still recognise that this may not be a permanent solution.

    And the only reason I had to test so often is that after half a century of diabetes my hypo warning is/was relatively poor....
     
    • Like Like x 1
  16. searley

    searley Type 1 · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    1,637
    Likes Received:
    618
    Trophy Points:
    173
    You are in a good situation really as far as insulin goes because your body still produces some

    So a slight over/under dose sort of get compensated for by the body..

    Insulin is nothing to stress about just takes being organised.. and in the early days when you don’t know why you feel in a certain way do a blood test

    Carry some fast acting glucose an a cereal bar

    Many discussions I’ve had with my care team say I’ve probably extended my own insulin production by starting insulin early - which they agree makes control easier
     
    • Like Like x 2
  17. Millie74

    Millie74 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    175
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Hi. I didn’t think about a possible allergy to a sensor. That’s a pain. So you coped ok finger pricking 8 x per day? To be honest I do 6 tests now with finger prick. I was more worried about hypos whilst exercising or sleeping at night.

    I heard the Dexcom is more expensive?
     
    #37 Millie74, Apr 19, 2021 at 3:59 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2021
  18. Millie74

    Millie74 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    175
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Thanks. I have heard that many think it’s good to start early. I’m not sure what they’ll do with me as they’ve asked me to record my results before the 3 meals and bed. It is generally always 8 before breakfast, but before lunch and evening meal on low carb only around 7. I did a porridge and pizza experiment for them Saturday and was 9.7 before lunch and 10.4 before bed. But I prefer eating low carb.
     
  19. becca59

    becca59 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,149
    Likes Received:
    2,740
    Trophy Points:
    198
    I am a type 1. In general I eat fairly low carb as I prefer the type of foods I am eating. Some days I eat absolutely nothing, and I mean nothing. Other days I eat shed loads of carbs. Perhaps when I am eating out at restaurants (in the good old days) or when I am at someone’s house and they have gone to the trouble to cook. Or as now on my holidays. I have maintained my weight for 7 years at a level below the previous 30+ years and have an HbA1c of 45 with an 80% time in range. Insulin has allowed me to do that. It is not the enemy, and is nothing to be ashamed of. It is the lifeline towards a normal life. Hypos happen yes. But you learn to manage them. I tend to munch jelly babies and just keep going. You will manage too. It will require some work but will be worth it.
     
    • Like Like x 3
    • Winner Winner x 1
  20. Millie74

    Millie74 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    175
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Thanks. That all sounds really positive and flexible. How do you manage on days you eat little/ nothing? Doesn’t that throw your insulin requirements out? Do you have a libre?
     
    #40 Millie74, Apr 20, 2021 at 7:49 AM
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2021
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook