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Worst place....

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by Debloubed, Jan 13, 2015.

  1. himtoo

    himtoo Type 1 · Well-Known Member
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    Hi @Debloubed

    what a switched on young lady you are !
    have read through the entire topic and you highlighted a humorous yet serious point we all potentially go through.

    if your future employer does not follow through and hire you they were not worth working for.

    top marks -- you are a star !!!
     
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  2. amar1921

    amar1921 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    In the middle of the sea ! Luckily I had glucose tabs with me, but again really bad feeling
     
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  3. keishamarie

    keishamarie Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Mine was the middle of the woods and I'd forgotten any kind on glucose so I sent my mum running back to the car to get glucose tabs while I sat with my head between my knees gripping onto earth like I was going to fall off and to top it off 2 elderly ladies walked past me and tutted under their breath about how the youth were so disgusting and horrible for being so 'drunk' all the time I tried to defend myself but obviously slurring my words didn't exactly help! So embarrassing!
     
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  4. Insulinman

    Insulinman Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    HI
    Bin there done it. The one I remember the most was in the middle of a Hospital DIABETIC appointment Talking and STUFFING
    Mini MAR's Bars, The Fantastic Female "Boss" Consultant "Said" I presume you are Having a HYPO???????

    Regards INSULINMAN on a Pump
     
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  5. Dillinger

    Dillinger Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello,

    Don't be silly; you are just embarrassed. Send them an e-mail when they reply about the start date saying "by the way I just wanted to let you know I was having a minor diabetic issue when we last met; I hope that it didn't cause any concerns? Normally that type of thing doesn't happen!"

    I remember going around a supermarket going slightly hypo and coming out with such a bunch of rubbish; I think I had about 4 different types of peanut butter. They must have loved me in there...

    Best

    Dillinger
     
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  6. AndyS

    AndyS Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Middle of Kingscross Station while running for a train. It was a good one at 1.2.

    Edit: Actually there was one I had in New York on 5th Ave. Legs were a bit wobbly and had nothing on me, sat down while wife ran off to find something. Lots of funny looks from people thinking I was oddly dressed for a homeless person I guess.
     
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  7. Debloubed

    Debloubed Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, what a lovely thing to say!
     
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  8. Postitnote

    Postitnote Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I still find it funny (funny after the event that is!) that, when you have a hypo and are feeling and no doubt looking quite ill and behaving strangely, you deal with it by stuffing sweets into your mouth. Any other time when someone is ill, the reaction is generally "give them some water", "get them some air", "have them lie down" etc. etc. But, for us it's "get her some goddamn jelly babies, stat!"
     
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  9. Debloubed

    Debloubed Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    What is even funnier is that often people around you don't say or do anything?! I know we have discussed that perhaps we don't look as bad as we feel but still, it can't be normal, lol!
     
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  10. Amina9191

    Amina9191 Type 1 · Active Member

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    I got really bad hypo once during a group presentation at university. I didn't want to let the group down so I didn't say anything 25 minute later my BG got do low I ended up fainting.
     
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  11. Natalie1974

    Natalie1974 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Whilst out walking my dog across the Kent countryside, having had a last minute change of coat...stupidly leaving my emergency glucose tablets in other pocket...went suddenly very low. My partner had no choice but to leave me where I was and dash back to the car for supplies. Whilst standing in the middle of a field holding onto a pylon for dear life...I witnessed two seemingly enormous deer charging across the field, only missing me by a couple of feet. I was absolutely stunned as I'd never seen anything quite like it despite being a regular walker in the area. Obviously when my partner got back I was excited and trying to tell him all about it...whilst he plied me with glucose tablets and insisted I was hallucinating...he still believes I imagined it to this day.
     
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  12. Seriously_Sax1989

    Seriously_Sax1989 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    In the middle of the sea???? What happened? Sounds awful!
     
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  13. mangobe

    mangobe Type 1 · Active Member

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    My most recent bad hypo involved having to starve overnight before surgery then accidentally overdoing my short acting insulin, which resulted in a hypo just as I was being prepped for surgery. Because I have no visible hypo symptoms I seemed perfectly OK despite a very low BG reading, so the nurse and anaesthetist were more concerned with trying to work out how and when I had taken too much insulin and whether I’d followed their protocol, rather than offering me a glucose drip to correct the hypo. Then the surgical team arrived to discuss important details of the surgery with me and although I managed to say “I am not in a fit state to think about this right now”, they were clearly completely ignorant about what the effects of hypoglycaemia are on both body and brain and how dangerous it is. They even gave me consent forms to sign while I was begging them to give me glucose quickly, so I scrawled a signature on the papers presented to me without understanding anything they had told me. As my surgery at least was delayed until I’d been treated and had recovered to within normal BG range, I had to ask all of the questions I needed answers to only when I was actually lying on the operating table. My signature on the consent forms was actually invalid as it was obtained while I was incapacitated, but because of the invisible nature of my hypo state, even Drs who knew my BG reading assumed I was normal and competent.

    Since losing hypo warning symptoms I’ve had many hypos in public places, and almost always am assumed to be mad, drunk, drugged or all three. Somehow, before I lost my warning symptoms I don’t recall having a single bad hypo at all. Tingling fingers always alerted me in good time to treat the hypo before it progressed. When they did start happening without warning it took me a long while to figure out what was going on. My first attacks happened at work (on Film and TV shoots abroad), and as a result I could no longer drive company vehicles and was no longer able to do my job as an Art Director.

    So I resigned and went travelling and had a bad hypo on a bus traveling from Bulgaria to Greece. We had stopped at the one and only café along the route and every single item sold was loaded with honey or sugar so I bought nothing (I’m quite fanatical about only eating whole foods and resent being forced to eat refined junk food). Sometime later I came to lying on the front seats with all eyes on me, being looked after by a Greek passenger who spoke broken English and told me he had a son with Diabetes living in Canada, so he knew what to do and had read my medic alert bangle, and presumably he’d given me some form of sugar. I was very embarrassed at holding up the entire busload of locals and behaving like a crazy foreigner, but my embarrassment became even more of an issue by the time we reached our final destination in Greece. At embarkation all passengers’ passports had been handed to the driver and were piled up on the dashboard in large piles of Bulgarian and Greek, with only one British passport (mine) and one Belgian passport which belonged to a skinny guy who was drinking litres of coke and increasingly frequently along the journey asking the bus driver in English to stop so he could have a ****. The rest of the passengers became more and more upset about this and after laughing and jeering at him, by the time we approached our destination in built up city streets, they started shouting at him in Greek or Bulgarian and seemed to be berating the driver for stopping again. The guy was clearly absolutely desperate and could not wait even 5 minutes so had to beg the driver to stop on a very busy main street just outside the bus station so he could **** against the bus wheels. I felt acutely sorry for him and spent much of the journey deliberating over how to tell him that he probably had Type I diabetes and needed to see a doctor.

    I knew he was far from home because he had a Belgian passport and accent and his symptoms were exactly the same as mine before diagnosis, so I was convinced he was developing Type 1. Nevertheless I was so afraid that having caused a scene by having a public hypo in front of him on the bus, a suggestion that he had the same condition as me would be a horrific introduction to Diabetes for him. I know that my biggest fear on diagnosis was that I would be a public embarrassment due to hypos (apart from fear of the complications due to hyperglycemia) but before losing my warning symptoms hadn’t actually experienced that feared problem for 15 years of being diabetic, so in the end I decided that the diagnosis couldn’t come from me. I said nothing when we got off the bus, and have worried about him ever since.

    A few days later on a sizzling hot day, while trying to catch buses and taxis up a steep hill to where I was staying I had another hypo. I did very foolish things on buses again, trying to put coins in slots not meant for coins and brandishing maps in front of drivers until they stopped to get rid of me. I had no idea where I was so hailed a taxi and then refused to get out of the taxi or pay when he arrived at my destination because I didn’t recognise it and became paranoid about where the driver was taking me. He called the police who came and arrested me and took me back down the hill to the police station where they examined my arms for needle tracks after finding insulin syringes on me. I could only tell the police that I didn’t know where the taxi driver was taking me. Luckily at some point in their interrogation I found a sandwich I had in my backpack and ate it in the police station, but at no point was I aware that I’d been hypo. I was dropped back at the bottom of the hill, sopping wet with sweat and with no money for another taxi, so had to trek up the hill again. When I got back to the B&B at the top of the escarpment, my host introduced me to two English girls who’d just arrived and said I must talk to them because we had a lot in common. I thought I had diabetes on the brain when I noticed one of them pulling out a little black kit bag and doing a blood test.

    Back in England the adventures continued. I went to register with a new GP in London and was sitting in front of him explaining that I seemed to have hypo attacks with no warning symptom at all and while explaining this became hypo. He said to me” You’re confused, go away and come back when you’re not confused”. I staggered off to the tube station, lost my wallet and tube pass and collapsed on a platform. This was a very dangerous place for me to be as I had no control of my body and could so easily fall under a train. I lay on the ground fitting and sweating for an unknown time and when I came round, station staff accused me of making the story up when I asked for help because I couldn’t find my ticket or my wallet and credit cards when I tried to exit the station.

    On one occasion some years later I had just bought a classic Saab car and for the first time had had to park my prized possession in the hospital’s car park while going for an X-ray or some non-diabetic related appointment. The waiting time took much longer than I expected and I apparently became hypo and lost consciousness. I woke up on a trolley being wheeled to A&E with the porters/nurses talking about me. They were trying to wake me or keep me conscious by talking and were asking my name, my address, what year it was etc. I was fully aware of what they were saying but was still in early recovery and actually hadn’t yet recovered the physical coordination necessary to speak, so was lying there listening to them and thinking how ridiculous it was to pressure me to waste precious energy/glucose on talking when my BG was clearly still too low. I didn’t know how long I might have been unconscious for so started worrying about my precious new car overstaying the parking voucher I’d left on its windscreen. When I didn’t reply I heard one of them say “She’s probably homeless” and was shocked and horrified that they would assume this. As soon as I could manage it I blurted out something about my posh car waiting in the car park and getting a fine, but they didn’t take that very seriously. I can only assume that my camouflage pattern clothing was sodden with sweat, and they thought this carefully chosen image was urine stained hobo style!

    Since then some of the more frustrating ‘unmemorable’ incidents have been flying to Amsterdam for one night in order to see a sold out art exhibition but getting no further than the museum café where Dutch permissiveness allows security staff to discreetly ignore those who stagger around and lie down instead of looking appreciatively at the artworks. A similar occasion was a London lecture by a world famous neuroscientist to which I gained entry by offering to help with admissions. A hypo put paid to any help from me and though I was still permitted to sit in during the lecture, I sweated and fitted my way through and heard and saw nothing, while those on either side of me were far too polite to ask if anything was wrong.

    I’ve now had so many public humiliations that I prefer as many people as possible to know that I’m diabetic and that I do have hypos, rather than suffer the indignity of being suspected of being mad and bad whenever I’m hypo, but sadly it has proved to be almost impossible to convey to non-diabetics including friends, family and Doctors, what exactly a hypo is.
     
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  14. himtoo

    himtoo Type 1 · Well-Known Member
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    bless you @mangobe -- i hope you are doing ok
     
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  15. Debloubed

    Debloubed Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @mangobe your stories make me sad but also, in a weird way, I find them comforting in a 'you are not alone' way! I hope you manage to get on a pump or get a cgm to help with your situation, you sound like a perfect case for a PCT funded cgm! xx
     
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  16. Flowerpot

    Flowerpot Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @mangobe have you been able to try a cgm to help you with hypo unawareness? That pattern of serious hypos (minus the travel) is similar to the way I was for years after losing hypo awareness. I now use a cgm wjth my pump and it has revolutionised my life in terms of the severity of my hypos and my own safety.
     
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  17. Scandichic

    Scandichic Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Had one myself at work on Friday! Apparently appeared manic whilst on break duty. Then went weird, burst into tears, felt spaced and had nothing sweet so had to go to our student centre. Where they made me eating a cheese sandwich, drink ribina and eat half a yoghurt bar. Only drank half ribena and ate only half sandwich and yoghurt bar. Am still dealing with effects today:arghh:. Bs been all over shop this weekend. I am T2 on meds so haven't got to inject like you guys! :(
     
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  18. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    In Morrisons supermarket,2008, after work, picked my daughter up from her dad's, had a cup of tea and a chat then went food shopping. Not a good experience,horrible and very embarrassed afterwards, as I thought there was a conspiracy going on and well I wont go on any more about it:oops: :rolleyes:
     
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  19. himtoo

    himtoo Type 1 · Well-Known Member
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    Hi @Robinredbreast
    that has made me have to write another "worst" -- but this only really gets in my top 10 of all time;) and your story has reminded me

    BG was dropping quick while out on a delivery in a company wagon but quickly popped into a supermarket to find something sweet
    made it to the sweets aisle and then just stood there dumbfounded as i could not summon the energy or decision making to pick anything-- i was found about 30 minutes later by a colleague still stood there as i hadn't arrived back at work and was imminently due back -- thank goodness for colleagues !!
     
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  20. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    There seems to be a common theme with regards to supermarkets and hypo's, wonder why that is :confused:
     
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