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90 per cent of obese people have to cope with fat shaming, according to new report

Discussion in 'Diabetes News' started by DCUK NewsBot, May 16, 2018.

  1. DCUK NewsBot

    DCUK NewsBot · Well-Known Member

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    Nine out of 10 obese people say they have been fat shamed because of their weight, according to a new survey. The report 'The current landscape of obesity services' was compiled by the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Obesity. A total of 1,450 people with obesity took part in a survey which informed the report. The survey showed that 88% of people reported having been "stigmatised, criticised or abused" for their obesity. It is troubling that, in a country in which most adults (63%) are overweight or obese, we cannot talk about weight without negative reactions. The extent of fat shaming is a problem as these negative reactions make it that much harder for people. Many people wish to lose weight and this can be very difficult when regularly being treated poorly by others. Shame can play a part in weight gain and adding more shame on top does the opposite of helping. The survey also highlighted problems with accessing services to help with weight loss. Only 26% reported that they were treated with dignity and respect by healthcare professionals (HCPs) and 42% of people did not feel comfortable discussing their weight with their GP. The figures show that communication and approachability have significant room for improvement in how people with obesity are supported. A total of 39% of respondents found it either "incredibly or moderately difficult" to access lifestyle services. It is perhaps not surprising, therefore, that more than one in three people stated that they had not accessed any lifestyle services. The report recommends that: "Obesity/weight management training be introduced into medical school syllabuses to ensure GPs and other HCPs feel able and comfortable to raise and discuss a person's weight, without any stigma." Furthermore, the authors state that access to services needs to be available to all. Chair of the group, Andrew Selous MP, said: "It is unacceptable that people with obesity can seek advice from their GP only to find local commissioners have not put in place any services. We want to see the NHS provide an appropriate and uniform service to people with obesity across the country." A lot of progress is being made to widen the access to services, however, the report outlines that there is still some way to go before people have the right level of support and services available.

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  2. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Expert

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    Our local council ran a scheme for years whereby a GP could write a prescription for free access to the Council owned Swimming pool. A few years ago the council had to start charging a fee (but subsidised) for the service. The council then had to abandon the scheme altogether because of cuts/austerity.

    Apportioning blame by fat shaming is abhorrant but equally disgusting is the lack of affordable services and the lack of education needed to tackle this growing problem.
     
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  3. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    I was told that I was overweight when I had a 24 inch waist and was working as a roadie for a folk duo - I could carry two speaker cabinets at a time so the extra weight was probably mostly muscle - but the doctor was adamant that 147lb was too heavy for someone 5ft 5 inches tall. Of course at that time Twiggy was the ideal body image and I was far more curvaceous.
     
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  4. Skippy1

    Skippy1 Type 2 · Active Member

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    My GP referred me to the local Livewell service to discuss a weight loss programme. I filled in the forms about eating habits/mental health and sent them off. As I walked into the consultation, I was greeted with, "I see you're doing low carbing. We don't do that here. If you want us to help, you'll have to use the NHS eatwell plate." I tried to explain about carbs and rocketing blood glucose levels, but she was adamant. I left without any help and more depressed.
     
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  5. vanillapie

    vanillapie Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    I think one of the issues that comes with fat shaming - at least in my case - is the mental health repercussions that come with it. I've been bullied my whole life for being fat, and that's given me a lot of mental health issues. Just the thought of going to a gym or going swimming gives me an anxiety attack because I feel that I am more than likely going to be called names when I do go. So I don't go, and I stay fat. And it goes on and on. It's a vicious circle and one that's hard to break. (Although I am trying hard to lose weight with diet now, but this is my past experience!)
     
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  6. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    I remember thinking how the young lifeguards must look at my fat body with disgust getting in and out of our local swimming pool until I heard through the grapevine I was admired by 2 for doing something about my weight and even swimming whilst pregnant.
    Not all people are thinking bad thoughts!
     
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  7. Alison Campbell

    Alison Campbell Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    This was my first annual review that I wasn't offered a free trial for slimming world and left the nurse laughing rather than seething or one year sitting in my car crying.

    I went on my first NHS diet aged 6 and avoid HCP's like the plague most of my life because the only response I have got for everything thing wrong with me is "well you could loose some weight" arghhh...!!!
     
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  8. Alison Campbell

    Alison Campbell Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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  9. AdamJames

    AdamJames Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    That seems to be a problem for my sister. She's older than me and quite a bit heavier but not T2, but is trying to lose weight. She loves swimming, and if she had a private pool she'd be in there all day, but when I ask her why she doesn't go swimming on her days off work she says it's because she hates the thought of being 'looked at' judgmentally as she enters the gym / pool.

    How ironic that the main obstacle to doing something to lose weight is the fact that she is overweight. If you removed judgemental people from the equation there wouldn't be that obstacle.

    I like to think that @ickihun is right however, and people who work at a gym, or go to a gym, should surely be the least judgemental, and most encouraging of anyone going there to try to improve their health. I really think they probably are, but I doubt I could convince my sister that because we do live in such a fat-shaming society.
     
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  10. NicoleC1971

    NicoleC1971 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I do work in a gym plus am not a natural skiinny and have met terrified newbies who have been sent by their GP to lose weight. They do feel really self conscious and some gyms have kit that is tricky for them to use e.g. treadmill 150kg man who could not use the incline feature, leg press is hard to get into if you have a gut not to mention that the place is full of skinny people who look like they know what they are doing and mirrors...I have to remind people that the diet thing is about 90% of the weight loss solution though in spote of all the inaccurate calorie counters on the machines etc. Exercise is great for lots of things including self confidence, endorphins, improving cv risk and making you more insulin sensitive but in study after study has been shown not to help people lose weight by itself. Consequently I think people should do movement that they love and although I work in one, I often encourage people to get outside and get some vitamin D on board!
     
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