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A1C 5.7

Discussion in 'Prediabetes' started by addictive_mate, Jun 16, 2019.

  1. addictive_mate

    addictive_mate · Newbie

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    Guys

    My doctor did a routine comprehensive blood test and in the report I see my A1C levels as 5.7. My Glucose fasting was in range though(5.4 mmol/L)

    My question is, I have been eating really unhealthy food last few months because I was away from home and careless. How worries should I be with these numbers? Can diabetes be prevented if I take some action now? What are your views?

    Thanks!
     
  2. addictive_mate

    addictive_mate · Newbie

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  3. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    Ah - still awake eh? I hope you aren't worrying about your numbers.
    The food you eat doesn't actually cause diabetes, it just allows it free rein to raise blood glucose.
     
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  4. addictive_mate

    addictive_mate · Newbie

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    Thanks does it mean that the high carb and junk food I ate may explain that number?
     
  5. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    Other way round - you are unable to deal with the amount of carbs you have been eating, so reducing the carbs will most likely move you back into normal numbers.
    It should help you lose weight too - as a side effect.
     
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  6. addictive_mate

    addictive_mate · Newbie

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    Sure, I'll do that! Thanks mate!
     
  7. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    No problem.
    I just checked on the standard chart for the conversion of your results to those I'm more familiar with.
    That figure of 5.7 is a high normal - I am just in the prediabetes range at 42, or 6 percent.
    Just take a good look at your carb intake, cut out the heavy stuff, you should be able to stay in the normal range, with any luck.
     
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  8. MeiChanski

    MeiChanski Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello,
    Did the doctor indicated that 5.7 is okay? While 5.7/38mmol could indicate you are okay. But it seems you are not far off from prediabetes range. Which is 6.0-6.4%.
    Over that is diabetes range.
    If you read around on the forums, there is lots you can do to prevent type 2 diabetes, through low carb high fat diet or keto.

    There is a lot of information on about hba1c levels on main page: https://www.diabetes.co.uk/what-is-hba1c.html

    https://www.diabetes.co.uk/downloads/HbA1c-units-conversion-chart.pdf

    https://www.diabetes.co.uk/hba1c-test.html
     
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  9. pavlosn

    pavlosn Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    5.7% is within normal non diabetic range (under 6%)
    That does not mean that you should not improve your diet but I do not see why this particular number should have you worrying too much.
     
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  10. alienskin

    alienskin · Member

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    5.7% is basically the high-end of normal. But what is the key here is whether this is part of an upward trend (which is likely). So if you were 5.3%, 2 or 3 years ago then it will continue this upward trajectory. At this point, you should be checking every 6 months max.

    The better news is that at 5.7%, it's likely the issue is mainly insulin resistance as opposed to progressive beta-cell damage. But the reason that it is rising is that your beta cells are no longer producing the amount of insulin needed to overcome the resistance which suggests some dysfunction. Lower the resistance, and you take stress off these overworked beta cells. If you can keep this resistance lower, then the beta cells are in decent enough shape at this time will serve you well for many years!

    The key is to deal with the issue now while you have reasonable beta-cell function. Lose weight if you're overweight, do exercise, stand up every hour, avoid too much high-GI foods like rice, white bread, pasta and so forth. Of course, doing these things at anytime is good, but the earlier you do the easier it is because you are preventing future beta-cell damage. Set yourself a target of something like 5.2% or so, and try to stay there. This target is very attainable from 5.7% but *much* harder the longer you wait.

    You might consider checking your blood at home. You can buy a cheap machine on Amazon. See what your blood sugar levels are like at 1 hour and 2 hours after eating. These post-prandial spikes are a good wakeup call that you need to do something!
     
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