1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2022 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Abbott Libre vs Libre Pro - Ending the confusion

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by faujidoc1, Aug 17, 2017.

  1. faujidoc1

    faujidoc1 Parent · Member

    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    43
    My daughter was diagnosed as Type I recently. After a lot of research on this and other forums, we zeroed in on the Abbott Libre as a 'must have' piece of equipment. However, there are two different versions of this device- the Freestyle Libre and the Libre Pro. Both differ in functionality, something which became evident on our initial internet searches. Yet the difference between the two devices seems to be unclear, even to the Abbott people tasked with selling the devices.
    I ended up procuring both the devices.... only Libre Pro is marketed in my country so I had to purchase the Freestyle from 'elsewhere'! This post is to clear the confusion that others (like me!) might be having in choosing between the two devices.
    The Libre Pro is marketed in US, India, Pakistan etc. This machine is deceptively named! In the final comparison, it is far inferior to the functionality offered by the Freestyle. The Libre Pro sensor can be activated only by the Libre Pro reader. No, Glimp S does not activate the sensor...despite what the Glimp user manual says. I know this because I have tried it! The reader is available only to medical professionals. The sensor stores upto 14 days of data. One can download the data earlier too, if you have access to the reader. However the graph displayed by the reader does not contain the latest Blood sugar level. Rather, the machine is designed to be reviewed by the physician at the end of the 14 day period. At this time the physician is to make 'appropriate' suggestions...like what? "MrX, on the 15th of August your blood sugar suddenly crashed after the midday meal..could you tell me what you ate and at what time? Or what you were doing at that time?."..DUH!
    The Freestyle Libre is far superior to the Pro version. It is targeted at the individual patient and is only available in a few countries -UK, Europe, the middle east, Singapore. The sensors are not interchangeable between the Pro and Freestyle versions! The Freestyle sensors can be activated by Glimp S, and read using the Glimp app. You can also use the Libre app to read the sensors, but activation will require the Freestyle reader. The libre app is geographically locked...even if you download it to your phone, you can't get it working outside the countries where the Freestyle is marketed. So, if you come from a country where the Freestyle is not marketed, you will be able to use only the Freestyle reader - if you want mobile functionality you will have to use the Glimp app.
    The Freestyle sensor stores upto 8 hours of readings at a time. You should wait for 24 hours before activating the sensor... readings tend to be erroneous if activated early after fixing. Be prepared to take a few Blood sugar readings in the first few days..you can use the built in Abbott glucometer. If you are using the Glimp app, the readings can be fed into the app manually, but you must be careful to give the exact date/time at which the reading was taken to help the app to calibrate.
    The Freestyle reader can be connected to your computer where the Abbott software can download and store long term data. The reader itself will display a chart showing last 8 hours Blood sugar graph as well as the most current reading. This reading will be in mMol/L or Mg/dl depending on the country in which you bought the reader and cant be changed. So either buy your contraband reader in a country with the same measurement unit or be prepared to relearn your levels (Mg/dl = mMol/L x 18).
    The reader also displays arrows showing the direction your blood sugar is heading- up,down or sideways. There is a built in insulin dose calculator, which can be accessed by a health care provider and will be available to the patient once pertinent data is fed into it.
    If you are getting the Freestyle from another country, you will need to set up a channel for a regular flow of sensors - sensors have a shelf life of 6 months only. Also keep in mind that you may not be able to exchange the sensors if found defective!
    Still, the Freestyle Libre is a real advancement that will definitely give you far greater control (and confidence) in managing your Type 1 diabetes.

    < Please add your tips and pointers to this thread!>>>
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  2. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Expert
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    8,627
    Likes Received:
    6,874
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Hi there @faujidoc1 Here in the UK we only have access to the Abbott Freestyle Libre Sensor, which is an excellent system for those wishing to monitor and access blood glucose readings over 24 hours, Abbott have a UK site which sells this system so users can order sensors when required, there have been issues with reliability of the sensors as well as adhesive issues, and each time I have had an issue Abbott have been able to replace the sensors, I cannot speak in regards to the Libre Pro as have no knowledge of this system. We have had lots of threads on the Libre sensor as most of our members are UK based so many have spoken of this system, have a look round at previous threads :)
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Informative Informative x 1
  3. TheBigNewt

    TheBigNewt Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,167
    Likes Received:
    374
    Trophy Points:
    123
    I take it you didn't try the Dexcom CGM. My friend's 11 year old son started using it from the get go. What he likes is that it works with his (and the kid's) phones constantly, there no "reader". And if his BG drops below 75 (about 4.1)it sounds an alarm that will wake him/them up. To me those 2 things make it a lot better than the Libre. I guess it's more expensive in the UK though. The Libre they use in the UK isn't even available in the US.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  4. himtoo

    himtoo Type 1 · Well-Known Member
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    4,764
    Likes Received:
    5,473
    Trophy Points:
    198
    my cynical side thinks this is a way for the US medical giants to procure more money from the diabetic population.
    reader can only be read by the professional = an appointment billed to insurance along with a user having a co-pay charge
    =more money for all the medical community yet less day to day help for patients.
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
    • Like Like x 2
  5. Shannon27

    Shannon27 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    288
    Likes Received:
    135
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Personally my experience with the Libre has not been good. I had the sensor fitted free from my local hospital, with another for 2 weeks down the line. They would have been fantastic if they'd worked right! The day after it was fitted I arrived home from work and tested using the Libre. It said I was 2.9! I instinctively knew this wasn't right as I wasn't getting any of the regular hypo symptoms, dizziness, hot flushes etc. I tested using my old monitor, the Contour Next USB model, which said I was 8.2! If I'd corrected believing i was 2.9 I could have gone very very high, potentially DKA. I might pick the Libre up again when it has been free on the NHS for a while, but until then, I'll deal with the rough fingertips.
     
  6. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,366
    Likes Received:
    1,220
    Trophy Points:
    158
    I expect that the USA legal and regulation systems makes it too costly and riskly to get the Libre aproved for none medical use in the USA. Just think if it gave a wrong reading and the resulting court case. In the UK it is a lot easyer to tell people they must still use a normal BG meter etc when the drive. (If somone in the USA kills another person while driving with the Libre, then Abbott could have a very large legal bill regardless of the outcome of the court case.)

    Remember in the USA people win court cases becouse they werer not told that black coffee may be hot!
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  7. faujidoc1

    faujidoc1 Parent · Member

    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Yes, this issue is common when you are first fitted with the libre. Abbott has a proprietary software built into the reader which will correct the raw data of the sensor over the first few days. However, the initial few readings tend to be inaccurate- the process of calibration can be accelerated by taking a few blood sugar readings using the built in glucometer. If you stick with it, the accuracy of the system improves considerably over the days as it collects more user data.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  8. Robbity

    Robbity Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    6,312
    Likes Received:
    16,112
    Trophy Points:
    198
    I've found that my Libre sensors need to sit and acclimatizie for a good 48 hours between insertion and activation otherwise I definitely get very low readings especially overnight and when I lie on my sensor arm. After this 48 hour initial settling in period it tends to be quite stable from start up.

    Robbity
     
  9. 4ratbags

    4ratbags Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,334
    Likes Received:
    9,555
    Trophy Points:
    178
    The freestyle libre has just become available here in New Zealand. I will definitely be buying one to test out.

    Sent from my SM-G955F using Diabetes.co.uk Forum mobile app
     
  10. GrantGam

    GrantGam Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,604
    Likes Received:
    1,579
    Trophy Points:
    178
    I doubt you would have been at risk of DKA by treating a 2.9mmol/l hypo @Shannon27... I'd treat a hypo of that level with 10g of carbohydrates (bringing me to circa 5.4mmol/l) on the assumption that I had no bolus on-board and my BG wasn't lowering further. How many carbs would you have intended on using to warrant DKA as a potential threat?

    I also had a fairly poor first experience with the Libre, so I understand your stance on the system. I did give it the benefit of the doubt however and subsequently ended up using the system practically full time for a year. My experiences during that time were almost entirely positive. Abbott are extremely helpful also and will do all they can to ensure that you have a positive experience, and that includes replacing sensors free of charge:)
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  11. Scott-C

    Scott-C Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,475
    Likes Received:
    2,730
    Trophy Points:
    158
    You can set it up yourself easily enough - the access code is CAA1C.

    The bolus calculator only works if you use the reader's inbuilt bg meter, and I can't be bothered messing about with the individually wrapped strips, but once it's set up, if you then add a bolus note when scanning it gives you an active insulin symbol which is kinda handy to get a sense of insulin on board, especially in stacking situations.
     
  12. kristineh

    kristineh Prediabetes · Newbie

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    23
    I am using Ambrosia's NightRider and LinkBluCon app with Freestyle Libre Pro it's working flawless. I can see glucose readings every 5 minutes on my Nexus phone and my wife can use FollowBluCon app on her iPhone to see my readings all the time. I also noticed Notes I enter are also immediately visible to my wife. Seems FSL Pro is available only in very few countries.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  13. vMorkova

    vMorkova · Newbie

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    How do you activate FSL Pro sensor?
     
  14. kristineh

    kristineh Prediabetes · Newbie

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    23
    I got a FreeStyle Libre Pro Reader.
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook