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Advice

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by Jc3131, Jun 22, 2017.

  1. Jc3131

    Jc3131 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Cheers I've just ordered it. £2.50 bargain.
     
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  2. Jc3131

    Jc3131 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Did any of you feel a bit unwel when your sugar levels started to drop? My levels are around the 6-9 mark and i feel rough. Keep getting headaches and my vision is all over.

    Dr gave me some urine testers for ketones today just as a precaution. Hes happy with my progress and kept my meds the same.

    I just need to shift this sickly and lethargic feeling.

    John
     
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  3. auroralapetite

    auroralapetite Type 1 · Active Member

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    Hi John, I got a few false hypos at 7s and 8s when I was first diagnosed. Apparently it's because your body gets used to the higher glucose levels and needs to readjust to what normal numbers are.
     
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  4. Jc3131

    Jc3131 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I want to let you know ive had an update from the drs. Its came as a shock but for some reason i knew this was coming.

    They did a blood test 3 weeks ago and they have found antibodies in my blood. I have been referred to hospital as a type 1 case. I have got my levels down under 9mmol and sometimes around the 4.4s on type 2 meds but its not the correct meds.

    Im in shock at moment as I cannot even think about injecting myself with insulin. I had a right carry on with the finger tests never mind an injection.

    Cheers John
     
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  5. Jc3131

    Jc3131 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Also ive done a ketone test and that was negative.
     
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  6. BeccyB

    BeccyB Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Well John, the good news is that Type 1's have more freedom when it comes to eating carbs! Many find the low carb diet makes it easier to manage but once you've learnt how to adjust insulin doses you can in theory eat whatever you want!

    Try not to worry about injecting - it sounds really scary but you'll soon do it without thinking. I'd rather inject than prick my finger as the needles are so tiny these days that the majority of the time I don't even feel it, but obviously the finger pricker has to make you bleed :)

    The main advice is the same as for type 2's - don't be afraid to ask questions, learn what you can, test and find out what works for you and most importantly don't beat yourself up - you'll get there x
     
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  7. fletchweb

    fletchweb Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    It may seem somewhat daunting but today's needles are very sharp and fine. When I was 5 I used to inject myself with something that resembled a spear (a bit of an exaggeration but you get the point - oops how's that for a pun LOL)

    Anyway, I use very fine needles and about 95% of the time I don;t even feel it. My favorite places to inject is the stomach just above the belt line and the side of my thighs. Needle technology has really improved since the 1960s. I think you will be surprised.
     
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  8. Jc3131

    Jc3131 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I had just started to get used to being 'classed ' as a type 2 and now this. It's a massive kick in the privates.

    I thought with type 2 meds seemingly working that that's what I was, type 2.

    I was planning going back to work on monday as ive felt better the last few days. But now i can't as I have hospital appointments next week.

    A worrying thing the dr said was if my bg goes above 15mmol and I have ketones in my urine I have to go to A and E. The hospital said they weren't worried as my levels were ok.
     
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  9. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    It's good you got an answer finally. Don't be upset - finding out and getting the right treatment now will benefit you enormously.

    Think of this as something positive. Too many people are misdiagnosed as Type 2 for ages before they're found to be Type 1. You're lucky in a way as you've got very good care and found out in good time :)

    Please join us in Type 1 where there are lots of friendly people who can answer any concerns you might have :)

    Don't be scared of the injections. Theyre not like getting a vaccination or anything. They're easier :)
     
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  10. Jc3131

    Jc3131 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Cheers. Im totally lost off at the moment. Too much searching on the internet has my head done in.
     
  11. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    Keep it simple to start with :)

    You're not alone. They are lots of people with Type 1 who,were diagnosed as adults. Now you have your diagnosis, make sure you get the right meds and see a consultant asap.

    If you want a book, Think Like A Pancreas is a fantastic book for Type 1s and a friendly read.

    Have a browse through the Type 1 section here.

    Important things to remember are that its not your fault in any way and that there is no cure (iso ignore the **** on some dodgy sites online) but there are advances every month :) You can control Type 1 :)

    When you're ready, ask whatever questions you want in the Type 1 section.
     
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  12. pamital

    pamital Type 2 · Active Member

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    Thanks for this! I'm currently doing a vlcd which I'll follow up a lchf lifestyle or 5:2. My eyes are awful at the moment but I have researched it. It's quite scary actually. I can barely see my phone sceen so I've had to enlarge the text!
     
  13. Scott-C

    Scott-C Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Sure, I felt like that to start with before my first one, but I think maybe that a lot of it is down to the fact that most people's prior experience of injecting is having a nurse putting a fairly large needle in a vein in the arm.

    But it's not like that all. It is totally different when you personally are in charge of it, it's a tiny needle, typically 4 or 5 mm, and it's not going into a vein, just into your stomach or thigh.

    I still get a bit freaked out when a nurse is taking a blood sample, but me injecting myself, no problem. Completely understand you being anxious about it, but once you've had a few goes, most people say, ooh, that wasn't as bad as I thought.

    Most people associate injections with pain, because of bad nurse experiences (I remember one newly qualified nurse physically scraping the needle on the outside of the vein - aaargh!) but I've never found them to be painful.

    You'll have a lot to learn about how insulin works, but one main thing which I think should always be borne in mind is that insulin operates over time. It has a shape or pattern: don't know which one you'll be using but Novorapid, for example, takes about 20 mins to start working, peaks after about 1.5 to 2 hrs and lasts for about 4 to 5 hours in total. So, you need to remember that if you're doing something in about 3 or 4 hours time, such as exercise or eating again, you'll still have active insulin working to lower your sugar and that will have a bearing on what you do in terms of eating/injecting. Some of the "surprise" hypos people get late afternoon can be attributed to that last couple of hours of action kicking in.
     
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  14. Jc3131

    Jc3131 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Just want to bump this topic back up as I have just read it all again. It's amazing how much I have learnt since I was diagnosed. Still a very long way to go as I am still honeymooning with my type 1.

    This forum and it's members have been great and the advice on board is always a help. I purchased the think like a pancreas book and have managed to read 90 pages (great for me as I don't have a great attention span) and even though a lot of the book doesn't sink in straight away, it is good to use as a reference to look up any info you need.

    I was horrified reading I was getting readings of 17mmol and now realise that the readings I currently get are not too bad. Normally around the 6mmol mark on a morning and if I do get a spike after a meal it drops quite quickly.

    As for injecting insulin, it's not a great thing to have to do but it's quite painless, bar sometimes I start laughing when I have to count to ten before withdrawing the needle. Nervous laugh I guess.

    Just hope my worrying and the advice I received will help other newly diagnosed diabetics while searching this site.

    My latest issue is that I am allowing diabetes to take over my life, which is understandable as I want to get things as right as I can. Hopefully I can look back on this in the future and wonder what all the worry was.


    Cheers John

    Sent from my SM-G930F using Diabetes.co.uk Forum mobile app
     
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