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Annoying

Discussion in 'Reactive Hypoglycemia' started by LouisSunny, Jun 22, 2021.

  1. LouisSunny

    LouisSunny Type 2 · Member

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    Hi, I had the most frustrating appointment with my GP today. I had to keep repeating that I have hypo symptoms really bad in the 4’s, falling over and not being able to concentrate or see properly. I have learnt so much in the past 7 years since being diagnosed with this awkward illness. I find it really upsetting that it’s a constant battle with GP’s & Nurses who just don’t get it and make you feel that you are making it up! Unless you are type 1 or type 2, it seems like we have to just manage in life. I have been in hospital three times with kidney stones and they don’t get it there either? Why is it so misunderstood?
     
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  2. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    Hi, you are going through what I went through before a true diagnosis from a specialist endocrinologist who recognised the symptoms and backed it up with the tests necessary.
    The reason mainly is training, through medical school, they don't have the information to learn about rare conditions that they may never come across.
    The assumption in medical texts is the reason it has been renamed, from idiopathic postprandial syndrome. To a group of conditions called Hypoglycaemia. I have Reactive Hypoglycaemia. They don't understand why we produce too much insulin. This has never been researched, the reasoning behind it is because until recently, Hypoglycaemia was diagnosed for other conditions of the pancreas such as insulinoma, pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer, with metabolic conditions, they assume it is a thyroid or hormonal. They don't understand the abnormal dysregulation of blood glucose levels and how the insulin response is never tested, that is one of the problems with T2 as well. Hyperinsulinaemia has never been researched though it is common in many metabolic conditions. Again never tested for.
    Because food is the trigger, especially in RH, it also effects many endocrine conditions. The almost novel perception in medical books and teaching that the brain needs carbohydrates to have good brain function. So the dietary advice is ridiculous, because it can, in my case my brain function improves when in ketosis, no carbs.
    I looked at a study from an American university about where inflammation occurs.
    They established that too much glucose derived from food and drink, the excess of hormones in blood, means that because the population is less active, the high levels of hormonal response has to be somehow got rid of. So the excess is then absorbed into the endocrine system. Inflammation, fatty liver, liver function and so on is the precursor to high insulin levels due to insulin resistance and excess circulating insulin. The result in most is weight issues and if you are susceptible to metabolic conditions, the advice first and foremost is eat the foods that causes the blood glucose to be the dominant hormonal imbalance after food, that is why GPs use the hba1c levels to diagnose..
    Endocrinology is a large specialty, to know about why certain conditions effect different people, some are inherited, a few are trauma, some are environmental, some are geographical and of course, the availability and a balanced diet. Of course the difference in being in poverty or privilege, will make a huge impact on your health.

    Until we get trained medical personnel who have the ability to recognise different conditions, the battle continues. This is the main reason why this forum exists, a different approach that actually achieves good results in people's lives.
    Why the medical establishment and government still insist on the textbook medical care to treat with drugs and eventually insulin.
    Most would really benefit from going lower carb and improving their exercise and management of the symptoms.

    Keep safe and like me follow the logic that you can control your health with being sensible about your dietary intake.

    The doctors don't really understand what happens to us!
     
  3. Seacrow

    Seacrow LADA · Well-Known Member

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    They don't get diabetes in general. I got admitted, after having nothing to eat for 36hrs, told them I was on a pump with basal insulin. They told me to wait another eight hours when breakfast would be available. The head nurse told me I might feel a bit funny, but nothing to worry about. A rare form of insulin malfunction? You've got no chance.
     
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  4. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    It is laughable when a patient is told they have carb intolerance, they still insist on having carbs as part of their daily intake. The food in hospital and especially on the diabetic ward is unbelievable. Everything they ask you to consider is laden with carbs and sugars.
    The NHS guidelines on diabetes is considered as if all types of diabetes are the same.
    And the belief of carbs being necessary.
    I always use the peanut allergy, when trying to explain why supposed healthy carbs are not healthy for me.. it is quite the reverse. Avoidance is better than being ill!
     
  5. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    I was told that my grandmother was left unconscious after not being given food in hospital. She was only saved as my father went to take her wash bag and recognised the smell of ketones on her breath from some distance away - we both had a sensitive sense of smell and taste.
     
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