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Any (non Insulin using) Type 2s not home testing?

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by Andrew S, Jan 24, 2014.

  1. Andrew S

    Andrew S Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I have still not bought a meter and have had over a year since diagnosis without testing. I am wondering if this is unusual.

    For me, the factors against testing are:

    Busy lifestyle
    Financial
    Already have been told I have excellent control
    The possibility that the odd high result may depress me

    For testing:

    It is advised by the DCUK site and most members of this forum
    I could be a little more scientific about what foods are working for me
    I could try to use my results to improve control even more.
    I could test when sick with a bad cold (such as I have at the moment!)
     
  2. nuttybeaver

    nuttybeaver Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi. I'm T2 (diagnosed July) and not testing.

    I'm investing in a meter soon as finding 3 months between tests too long. Also starting to exercise more & want to keep an eye on my levels.

    :)

    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
  3. carraway

    carraway Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    I test using Sd Code Free which is cheap(ish) to run. I'd rather have control myself. I don't test when I am eating something I have regularly but I check out other food combinations to see how they affect me.

    I don't want a GP to be in charge of my health. I want to look after myself as much as I can.

    And surprises scare me. I'd rather know.
     
    • Like Like x 4
  4. catherinecherub

    catherinecherub · Guest


    Hi Andrew,
    Looking at your reasons for not testing

    **Busy lifestyle.
    Takes less than a minute to test your blood sugar.

    **Financial.
    How much is good health worth?

    **Already been told I have excellent control.
    What is your HC Team's interpretation of good control?

    **The possibility that a high result might depress me.
    Not knowing when you are getting spikes and how high might put you on the road to complications if you continue with the same foods that are causing the spikes.
    If you and your HC Team are relying on Hba1c it is an average so how do you know how often you are spiking and how high these spikes are?
     
  5. Andrew S

    Andrew S Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    You win on "Busy" and "Financial" catherinecherub, as we can all make excuses not to do something, but will find the time/money if we really want to do something badly enough.

    It really boils down to whether the NHS is correct that "there is no need to test" which is what my GP told me a little over a year ago. It could be that by keeping my weight down, having an HbA1c of 37 and keeping active I will go OK. The thing is, do we know for certain that "spiking" is harmful or is it the longer term picture that is sufficient to tell whether harm is likely?

    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
    #5 Andrew S, Jan 24, 2014 at 1:17 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 24, 2014
  6. Beshlie

    Beshlie Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I find testing gives me peace of mind as I learn what I can eat that doesn't spike me, and I've had a few surprises! I think much the same as carraway and use the same meter which is not expensive to run.
     
  7. Beshlie

    Beshlie Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I don't think a spike is harmful so long as bs returns to what is normal for you quickly. But how would you know if you didn't test? I tried something different for breakfast today and spiked up to over 9, which is too high for me, so I will test each hour until I return to normal - and never touch that food again!! Live and learn :oops:.
     
  8. johnco

    johnco · Member

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    A non diabetic does not go above 7.8 under `normal` circumstances - are you happy to believe an organisation( working to a budget) that going above this figure won`t harm you?
     
  9. Yorksman

    Yorksman Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    You'd really need to get your doctor to quantify what he means by excellent control. Some think fasting levels around 7.0 or a hba1c around 48 are good control yet that will still allow for a deterioration in condition in time. Then they just say, 'well, it is progressive'. It becomes a self fullfilling prophecy. A meter would free you from subjective statements and allow you to be more objective.

    Yes people can scare themselves, and do to begin with, but you get used to how it all works within a couple of months. Another thing they are quite rightly nervous about is people convincing themselves that they have everything under control and therefore, a packet of biscuits isn't going to hurt, well, it didn't last time so it won't this time, or next time either.

    I found testing to see which foods work and which foods do not work for me invaluable. I learned to cook using stuff which suited me and generally do not have a problem with choice. What meters don't do of course is stop you being tempted.
     
  10. Joe Sweatthang

    Joe Sweatthang Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Andrew, I was told exactly the same thing. That my lifestyle was keeping it under control. I was also told I should eat starchy food such as potatoes and pasta. So I got myself a meter as I thought the eating advice I got was BS. The meter confirmed that. Then I called the nurse to find what my HBA1c level was and I was told it was 54.1. That HBA1c value tells me I haven't got my diabetes under the control I want.
     
  11. Erling

    Erling Type 2 · Newbie

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    I have a meter but don't use it much. Used it more the first year and I could see great improvements both in my readings and in HBA1c. After that I could think; this time it will be a little better, and the HBA1c wasn’t the next time it was the other way around.
    If your HBA1c is 37 I can’t see any reason to test yourself. You are obviously doing the right thing.
     
  12. Andrew S

    Andrew S Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the feedback from all who replied. Food for thought! I am curious more than anything else to see how badly I "spike" to the wrong foods and how quickly I can recover. Nevertheless I agree with Erling (and my GP) that there is no need to test in my case. I have mainly stuck to the dietary changes they advised. I have quite an active lifestyle and I think that must help enormously.

    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
  13. Andrew S

    Andrew S Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    This may be available online also, but here are the NHS Hounslow Blood Glucose Monitoring guidelines obtained from the X-PERT course last night:

    Testing schedule

    This applies to patients who are NOT on insulin therapy

    . Routine testing is not recommended for patients on diet and exercise only

    .Routine testing is not recommended for patients on oral tablets or other non-profitIndian treatments unless you have discussed and agreed a testing plan with your GP or Diabetes Team

    .Your GP or Diabetes Team will expect to see a record of your blood glucose results.

    . How much, and the need for testing will be reviewed by your GP or Diabetes Team

    . Where you have agreed a testing plan, testing up to 2-3 times a week is usually sufficient

    .Vary the time of day BUT testing should always be immediately before breakfast and two hours after main meal

    . Record results in a diary - you should write the reason (if you know, for example: ate more or less food) for any results which are higher or lower than normal

    . Dispose of used planets in a sharps box which can be obtained on prescription from your GP practice. Full boxes to ve returned to GP surgery.

    . Normally, glucose levels should be between 4mmols and 7mmols before meals and between 7mmols and 8.5mmols two hours after a meal

    Higher or lower than normal results

    . If results are persistently above 8.5mmols or less than 4mmols over a 4 week period, you should contact your GP practice for advice and possible review if the treatment

    .Treatment is not usually adjusted based on a single result - a number of results are needed to ensure treatment is adjusted appropriately

    During periods of illness

    . Blood Glucose levels may be higher than normal

    . Because of this, you should make a note in your results diary of the dates when you were ill.

    Leaflet issued July 2011

    The trainer at the course last night did mention that it wasn't considered useful for patients not on insulin to test as they night get results which might just worry them and not make any changes to bring their results into line. I bit my tongue as it were, but surely people are using their results to try to improve their control?!



    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
  14. Squire Fulwood

    Squire Fulwood Type 2 · Expert

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    I feel I might have missed something here. How can you take abnormal readings back for a possible review if you have no clue as to the level of sugar in your blood. If things do not require a review I think I would like to see positive proof of that. I have never liked negative indicators.
     
  15. AndyH1

    AndyH1 Type 2 · Active Member

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    Hi Andrew,

    I,m, no expert on this but this is my experience.

    I am currently T2. I was on meds and tested fairly regularly. When I started doing regular exercise my control improved to the point where I came off meds (at my request). Then for a couple of years I rarely tested. Just went on the results of my HbA1c, which were fine.

    I ate sensibly and exercised a lot and never tested. I thought that the exercise was a panacea. Then I tested one day last spring, and I got a shock. Levels were up. Seems that the amount of exercise I was doing gave me such good day time reading that it brought my HbA1c down to normal. It was masking the big increase in fasting levels that testing would have picked up.

    Since then, I have been through improved diet, metformin and metformin sr, glicazide and now on Glic with Linagliptin. Which isn't working. I now have an appointment tomorrow with my GP, and I suspect that I will be referred to hospital.

    If I had tested more regularly, I might not have changed the outcome, but it might have delayed it.

    So my advice would be to test, and test regularly. I'm lucky my GP has always let me have test strips, although I suspect he wouldn't let me have more than 50pm. I believe NICE guidelines suggest testing for T2 is appropriate. Even so it would be worth the £7 pm for test strips.

    As others have said if you test regularly, it gives you knowledge and greater control over your condition.

    Andy
     
  16. Hawkeye

    Hawkeye · Member

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    Hi Andrew,
    I tested extensively over the first year to really understand my diet and how it affected my BS. Sunsequently, I only test when I am having food that I am unused to such as when I am on holiday. Nevertheless, I occasionally have a short period of checking, just to make sure that my regime/ diet is still being managed sensibly.
    Each to his own though.
    Best
    Hawkeye
     
  17. Incontrol?

    Incontrol? Type 2 · Active Member

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    I was given a monitor about 5 weeks ago,since that time I have tested regularly, seeing what food caused my levels to be high I have now got my sugar reading down from 14.4 to 6.1 (more often than not but never above 7.9 Testing as helped me to control my diabetes by way of changing my diet to low carb and I have lost over a stone in weight over a period of 5 weeks. I feel extremely fit and have not felt as tired as I used to before my change of diet. You said you have a busy life style, nevertheless, try to make time for YOU in that, testing only takes a minute of your time and if you do get a high reading then you will know it besg to change your diet - in my experience - ignorance is not bliss when it comes to thinking your levels are o.k. mine were definitely not. x
     
  18. Enclave

    Enclave Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member
    Retired Moderator

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    If you can honestly say you trust your medical practice then go with what they advise ... I could never trust my medical staff including the doc .. So have my own BS meter
    At the end of the day it's your life .. Not the people in medical centre


    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
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  19. Mud Island Dweller

    Mud Island Dweller Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Andrew a very confusing set of comments not sure but l dont think you believe in testing?
     
  20. spaglemon

    spaglemon · Active Member

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    This is exactly what I do using the same meter and I feel exactly the same as you on this, have had many surprises that I would have otherwise been unaware of, for example I now know that hovis wholemeal doesn't spike me in small amounts but kingsmill wholemeal does ? go figure
     
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