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Back in the day!!!!!!!!

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by Ushthetaff, Dec 22, 2019.

  1. rochari

    rochari Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for all the pics, porl69 and the memories that come with them. I started on insulin 55 years ago and I was the third in our house. My mother and grandmother were also type 1's. Every night the pot went onto the gas ring and three sets of syringes and needles were boiled up for 5 mins. My mum and I used the Clinitest tablets for testing urine but my gran wouldn't move to them and preferred Benedict's solution. She'd been using that for many years.

    Another odd thing was the needle fittings in those days. Mines was always the 'luer' size but both my grandmother and mother had syringes that were much more 'pointy' and thinner at the end and their needles were, I think, the 'record' gauge. No matter what size the fittings were the needles were truly enormous in length as your pictures show.

    Each of us had a small flat sweet tin with a lid. This is where we put each of our syringes and needles into after boiling, all resting on a bed of cotton wool. I vividly remember mine's have a red lid and I think it had Newberry Fruits stamped on it!

    Bill
     
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  2. JMK1954

    JMK1954 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm at the 55 year point too. Ooh, no pun intended. I can remember the Hypoguard container to store syringes and the brand Rocket syringes. I kept one for years in case the government suddenly went back on allowing disposable syringes to be prescribed for diabetics.

    I also remember bring told at a diabetic clinic in Liverpool in the 1980s that I no longer had to count carbohydrates. Yes, it really happened ! I argued rationally that that would mean either a risk of ending up hypo, or my BS levels rising unreasonably high, but the same nonsense was blithely repeated and my comments were ignored. By this point I was in my 20s with around 15 years' experience of type 1 behind me. I went home and ignored the nonsense. At succeeding clinic appointments, I was regularly asked if I still counted carbohydrates. I could tell from the way the question was put that they wanted the answer 'No', so I obliged to avoid a confrontation. Then they lost interest, just complimented me on excellent test results.

    It was the 1990s before I was asked the question again. I told them I had never stopped counting carbohydrate from the day I was diagnosed. Evidently carb counting was now back in fashion ! The whole thing was crazy, but must have done a lot of damage.Anyone else had any similar experience ? I wonder if it was connected with stopping the supply of diet scales which must have occurred around the same time ? Was the assumption, we can't provide scales so they need to guess all carbs in future ?
     
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  3. rochari

    rochari Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm with you 100% JMK1954. I was also told I no longer needed to count carbs I am sure around the same time but I never stopped and still do to this day. It was the same when the the multiple injections started and they tried their best to move me over saying 'you can eat anything you like - there are no limits because you compensate by increasing the fast acting'. That scared the heck out of me and said I'd prefer to stay on twice a day injections, keeping to my usual food pattern. They didn't like that at all and it was a real struggle to keep on a routine I'd been used to for years.

    All that said, there is no criticism from me about the basal/bolus regime. It works well for so many people and I think that's great.

    Bill
     
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  4. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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  5. Ushthetaff

    Ushthetaff Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Jaycee
    My god did that pic no bring back memories, with over 50 years in some cases of memories pictures etc it makes me wonder what the next 50 years will bring and what pictures will be like in say 20 years time, ( remember that Libre ...my god how did we manage lol)
     
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  6. Ushthetaff

    Ushthetaff Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    One thing this post does prove despite all the hardships and “ lack of tech” there are many of us “ long termers” still alive and kicking , so newbies take note it is possible to live a while longer than you may think ,
     
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  7. JMK1954

    JMK1954 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Glad that somebody else was told they didn't need to count carbs ! It was just insane. Over the years I have had a few theories about why. Perhaps they wanted us to eat more carbs to make up for the fact we were being told we needed to avoid all fat ? I reckon some consultant somewhere may have been carrying out an experiment and recruited a group of junior doctors to help. I'm afraid I lost confidence in the diabetes clinic staff as a whole as a result of the crazies I encountered.

    I never wanted MDI either, but I was given no choice. I was furiously angry at the way my wishes were over-ridden. My waking BS actually rose on MDI. The rest was the same as before. The doctor who had forced me onto MDI was really disappointed and kept saying my waking BS should have fallen. I immediately asked to switch back, but this was refused. In more recent years I have repeatedly had to fight for what I wanted, but now I know I can.
     
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    #47 JMK1954, Jan 1, 2020 at 1:35 PM
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2020
  8. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hi,

    From my experince the food at the time was all about "exchanges."
    I felt the fixed dosage of insulin I was on at the time was never adjusted. It was always the amount of carbs in the diet that was to compensate? "Oh, you're hypoing at this point in the day?" "Have another snack."
    I was on 3 square meals a day + a mid morning a mid afternoon & a before bed snack.. Lol. There is only so much bread & biscuit I could throw down my neck..
    Two ideas about the fat content at that time.. "Fat (they presumed?) made fat." They probably had a therory it also slowed down digestion & thought keeping metabolism to a regular as possible timing was the best way to deal with the exo insulin?

    Who knows? They weren't following me about, they just saw logged notes in a pee stained diary..
     
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  9. ronialive

    ronialive Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I loved TAB and Fresco but hated onecal
     
  10. ronialive

    ronialive Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Fresco was pineapple and grapefruit and tab was made by the coke company but not intended to taste the same. can still get it in America and I still love it.
     
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  11. rochari

    rochari Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    That's the one Jaylee. I didn't know Hypoguard sold the unit separately as the one I had came inside the blue plastic carrying box they made for insulin bottles, needles etc. Bill
     
  12. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hi,

    (Looking at your profile.) it's great to see another West country D. :)

    Yep, been a long time since I've sampled these drinks. Most of the sugar free stuff squash/cordial was obtained from my local chemist during the formative years on a diabetic shelving rack..

    We can probably thank the Jane Fonda explosion back in the day for the likes of Tab? ;):D
     
  13. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    All I had was the syringe case. (Sold separately.) lol. ;)

    I sort of winged it with the rest of the stuff.. A lot of "Tupperware" involved.
    There was a box for the needles that remind me a little of a drill bit case from a local B&Q?
     
  14. ronialive

    ronialive Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Jaylee,
    I feel very privileged as these drinks were expensive. I had a school friend whose Mother was wonderful. She always kept a tab and a fresco in the fridge for if I visited and also do you remember those packets of diabetic sweets- round that popped out like a tablet from packet. They were round and started rock hard but were supposed to be chewy and always stuck your teeth together.. Lime, orange blackcurrant flavours. I love the black currant- she always kept these also and when we had student teachers who always brought in chocolate for everyone when they left she always ensured I had diabetic chocolate as her husband was a teacher at the school. Such kind people to help me in my life. I was completely unaware as a small child and was always just pleased that the student thought of me. My mother used to buy things off us when we came home- had sweets she didn't want lol.
    Also do you remember vivil sweets- I liked orange but everywhere sold lemon .
     
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  15. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Couldn't find much on Clinitest kits with wee.. Note (someone corect me if my memory is wrong? Been a long time.)

    It was 5 drops of urine to 10 of water in a test tube. These tabs fizzed like the fire of Hades.. (Lol, maybe a little over the top.)
    But this is what the kids were doing before the wine industry seem to have jumped on? ;)

     
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  16. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Vivil? Got a vague recollection of the lemon flavour.. (Oddly, always lemon.) Usually gifted for birthdays & "stocking filler."
    Did they come in a tin?
     
  17. rochari

    rochari Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    JMK1954 in some ways I was lucky about MDI. I'd no idea what I was heading into that day at the clinic and I sat with the consultant who spent a lonnnng time praising me for everything, average sugar levels, no complications etc despite being on insulin so long. Then, he said he was changing my insulins and and injection regime and I asked him why especially after he'd just praised my control to high heaven on the existing regime. His reply was something like 'although your existing insulin is still being produced this is the the way ahead and everyone at this clinic is being moved onto it'. This was much the same reply I got when I questioned his decision to put me on statins. I refused those and I refused this proposed change. The choice should be mine unless there was a possibility my control would improve and it wasn't going to. It went even more quickly downhill when I asked if there would be financial gain for the hospital/his department by introducing this to ALL patients without discussion or agreement (as there had been with other changes to diabetic patients en masse over the years). The end result was, I remained on the twice-a-day regime (fortunately with the full support of my GP) and never saw that consultant again. I was told later I'd been removed from his list.

    Over the years I have met very many wonderful doctors and consultants at the diabetic clinic and some who have, what I call, the God Syndrome. I bet you've met them too because they are averse to discussing or agreeing things with the patient and it's a case of 'just do what you are told'. Always a challenge and always one I am up for.

    Bill
     
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  18. rochari

    rochari Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Jaylee, I think I mentioned before on here that I still have the original diet sheet given to my dad which was to be used for me as soon as I got home from hospital. I know I was only young but it it was pretty sparse! Butter shows as 1.5 ounce a day and I remember my mother having a hard time trying to make sure there was enough for the bread, biscuits etc included on the sheet.

    I'm sitting here right now looking at my mid-morning snack which was to be 2 digestive biscuits (or I could exchange it for 3 tea biscuits or NINE cream crackers). I still smile thinking about my mother saying I could forget the cream crackers because I'd need to eat them dry or just with a tiny, tiny amount of diabetic jam on each! Fruit is on it too but only at lunch or dinner-time. Oh, and the potatoes could be no larger than a hen's egg. Bill
     
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  19. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hi Bill,

    This is all starting to sound so familiar.. I was a bit naughty. Lol, had a little Cheddar cheese with my digestive.
     
  20. JMK1954

    JMK1954 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I was never told to eat potatoes of a particular size because we had been given a diet scale. 2ozs of boiled potato was 1 black line, ie. 10 g of carbohydrate. 2 thirds of an ounce of bread was 10g, or 8 ozs of carrot, or 2 ozs of peas. My parents and I could judge amounts accurately by eye after a few months, but I still weighed occasionally to check my estimates were remaining accurate, even as an adult. Anyone else remember Laurence's 'Line Ration Scheme' ? I was suddenly mocked by a doctor at my clinic after some years, for answering in terms of black lines when asked what I was eating. To be honest, I still think of carbs in 10 unit chunks. I find it easier. It doesn't mean I don't take the extra odd grams I need into account !
    I had not thought about some of this stuff for years, but basically it did work. If I show my face at a hospital clinic now, because I have grey hair I am routinely treated as if I'm an idiot. I have been told by nurses at the clinic that I'm type 2. I laughed out loud at that. It's either that or cry. In the old-fashioned days, nurses were trained in how to deal with type 1 as a matter of routine. Things started to go wrong in the 1980s. It's back to the 1970s for me !
     
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