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Back in the day!!!!!!!!

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by Ushthetaff, Dec 22, 2019.

  1. johen

    johen Type 1 · Active Member

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    Great post @Ushthetaff
    31 years for me! Urine testing was just about coming to an end. I was given the BM sticks but I was told to "cut them down the middle so they last longer" so a tub of 50 strips was actually 100, providing you had access to scissors. Then of course, the colour-matching to the side of tub which was totally impossible at the lower end as unless you were in a really good light, you could not tell the difference. Hail the light-up meters we have now! I had to go to my diabetes nurse at my hospital clinic for a few more bags of the disposable syringes as they were not yet available on prescription, though were relatively soon after that. I used to draw up insulin, from each of 2 bottles and had to make sure I had my lunch and evening snack on time otherwise I would hypo. When I changed to pre-filled pens a few years later, the needles were not available on prescription, so like before, I got a small box of 25 at a time from my hospital and told to use each one for as long as I could. Long was this ingrained in me that I still struggle remembering to put a fresh needle on each time.....
    I would love a libre freestyle. Unfortunately in my area they are severely restricted, limited to pregnant women, children or people who have had hospital admissions. I have fibromyalgia and painful hands (caused by long-standing diabetes) but I still do not qualify. :arghh: I am considering self-funding but it won't be something I can afford to do full time, so it'll be 4 weeks on and 4 weeks off at best. I can only hope they'll relent soon as with the syringes and then the needles... :nailbiting: Ahh onwards and upwards!!
     
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  2. Grant_Vicat

    Grant_Vicat Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    I think this is what you are looking for! Notice the earlier aluminium version on the left (early 70's). This might interest you all;

    1978 I went InterRailing round Europe with Jonty Ward, a great friend from school. We stayed with some of his relatives in North-West Paris for three days and then progressed towards Florence. By the time the train had reached Novara I was not very well and we decided to leave the train and look for somewhere for me to do my injection, in relative privacy and hygiene. We found nothing useful. Later on we looked at the Michelin Guide in which the first entry stated “Novara is a grim town.” We proceeded to Milan Central. As expected, the station was enormous and we had little difficulty spotting the signs for “Gabinetti”(WC). Unfortunately these were all holes in the concrete with squatting slabs. Nothing would make me inject myself in there. We therefore crossed the street and headed towards a brand new Al Italia office. Jonty sat with the back packs against a bus stop, while I ventured inside a very plush office, hoping to spot the magic sign. They were downstairs, which meant passing the reception desk. Once downstairs I was able to wash my hands and find the first proper lavatory in Italy. Wouldn’t the Romans be proud? This meant that I had somewhere I could sit behind a locked door. Having injected myself in the thigh, the fact that somebody in heavy shoes had been constantly pacing backwards and forwards outside my cubicle suddenly took on an alarming significance, so I pretended to be in there for legitimate reasons. He tried the door handle. I sweated. After a few minutes I realised the futility of my acting and decided to brave it. A tall man in a very smart braided uniform allowed me to wash my hands and then walked slowly ahead of me towards the stairs. On the way up, he spun on his heel and curtly demanded “Documenti.” I handed him my brand new passport, which aroused suspicion. He snatched my syringe case, which was of the old type, with a double ended spirit-filled tube inside an aluminium box. He opened this and started to unscrew the tube. In the best English that flooded into my racing head, I advised “I shouldn’t do that if I were you.” Spirit sprang over his wrist and for some reason he took exception to this. He had found what he wanted and pulled me up to the reception, where two other men were seated. Their conversation reminded me of a million starlings. Eventually I uttered the only words of Italian which I knew (probably in a laughable accent) “Sono diabetico.” Blank stares. Help! Should I try French? “Je suis diabetique et en regime d’insuline.” Suddenly the smallest of the three brilliantly deduced “ah, e diabetico” I could have kissed him and happily shot the other two.
     
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  3. Penquin47210

    Penquin47210 Type 1 · Member

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    Some real memory jerkers here having been through King's College Diabetic unit in 1962 aged 11 and still will not eat rabbit 'cos I had sat down to eat and was told "Can't eat that 'till you have done your injection."

    Same meal was sat there stone cold 11/2 hours later after having been shown how to assemble glass syringe, draw up units of 80 strength soluble porcine (didn't know that at the time) and been shown how to use Clinitest kit to test pee..... Vigorous bubbling etc.

    "You must eat it all as you have had your injection". Yuk as it had all congealed - sauce, mashed potato and unknown veg plus bony rabbit bits....... Talk about developing a phobia in an 11 year old - that was a major event.

    Now on pump, with cgm and worried if deviates even a tad (which it does after meals - surprise, surprise).

    Old needles (Rocket or Luer fitting) lasted for a MONTH then returned to chemist to be resharpened (like corkscrews and needed screwing into skin), developing lumps etc. in skin. Aluminium guard to put over thin slice of WHITE bread onlyand that was cut down to size = one portion and allowed 6 for breakfast, lunch and supper and 2 for mid-morning, mid-afternoon and bedtime plus one for waking up ! Aluminium screw top container to keep glass syringe in (in surgical spirit). Boil syringe in saucepan once a week to keep it sterile (!), managed to boil a couple dry, then melt the glass...

    Getting a replacement rapidly was not easy as only allowed one at a time.

    British Diabetic Association holiday for one week at school near site of Great Train Robbery and going to Whipsnade School. Many other memories from that time but have now survived 57 + years on insulin..........

    Lots of memories of doing things that "you can't do that as you're Diabetic" - oh yes I can, and did and have the certificates to prove it..... some considerable changes in opinion, supported by some excellent Doctors in various places.
     
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  4. Grant_Vicat

    Grant_Vicat Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    I have been having trouble uploading the following with a prototype Hypoguard case made of aluminium as well as the plastic one:
     

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  5. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Worrying experience I once got challenge by an official on a Greek island ferry. "Papers." He thought I had no ticket. My wife (partner at the time.) had them.

    Getting caught red handed;

    Spent 3 years at a dance college in Surrey.
    I got caught by a lad in the changing room injecting. (plastic syringe by this time.)

    The rumour went round I was a "junkie."

    It actually did me some "favours. "
    One fellow student I had a "thing" with. I plucked up the courage to ask her out.. "I don't know..." She replied, "I've heard stuff about you..?"
    Going for broke. What could I say but "yep, they're all true.."
    Lol, to my surprise she actually said "OK."

    About ten years back we had a reunion back in Epsom.

    "Hey! You look great. So you managed to kick the habit?" No, I didn't... Still diabetic. ;)
     
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  6. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hello little brown needle box. Long time no see! :)
     
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  7. therower

    therower Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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  8. Grant_Vicat

    Grant_Vicat Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Somewhere I've got a converter for using record needles to a Luer fitting! Like the posts Bill
     
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  9. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hi @Penquin47210 ,

    "White bread only?" This rings a bell.. I remember in the early years my mum being quite upset (I would have been 8 or 9?)
    We'd been to an appointment at the clinic & i'd mentioned I liked brown wholemeal bread to the HCP?
    Lol, from what I could gather. They frowned upon this & pretty much gave my mum a hard time. She seemed to be muttering something about "they think they don't know what's good for my child." They weren't to keen on me eating salad neither, as I recal..?
     
  10. Tonto73

    Tonto73 · Member

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    I’ve been type one since 1977. Food was awful and “diabetic food”. Remains awful ( and a con ). I do miss Jackson’s of Devon diabetic sweets though! They were tasty and I’d finish a pack in an afternoon and spend the night by the lavatory!
     
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  11. Grant_Vicat

    Grant_Vicat Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    just over 32,000
     
  12. Grant_Vicat

    Grant_Vicat Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Schweppes Slimline Tonic Water came out in 1965. My parents always got me a glassful whenever they took us to the pub. I still drink it!
     
  13. _dr__rossco_

    _dr__rossco_ Type 1 · Newbie

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    I can remember having to buy disposable syringes pack of 10 cost £1.10 and a box of 100 medi swabs and having to go to toilets if you were in a pub/restaurant to do your injection as you had to use the 2 viles of insulin had also forgot about the blue plastic sleeve with spring inside to keep glass syringe and that needle what can you say it was massive but 40 years later still here and when I meet guys that I went to school with I actually in better condition than they are. As people said in previous comments about checking urine I have to be honest for many years I didn't bother much checking urine but my BS levels when going for check ups were always good and since finger pricking started my levels have always been between 6 & 7. What helped me was playing football and going to gym 2 or 3 times a week. But definitely glad for all the newly diagnosed that things have come a long way since then and they can live a healthy life and do what they want in life being diabetic shouldn't stop you from doing and achieving anything in life
     
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  14. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Wasn't for me when I was a nipper. I seem to remember my dad letting me try it.
    However, I've aquired a taste for it with gin... :)
     
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  15. Grant_Vicat

    Grant_Vicat Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    This occured in the late 90's and exactly echoes your thoughts:
    A short while before, I had had a totally different reaction from a junior doctor at King's.
    “Why are you on such an old fashioned system?”
    “Because it works.”
    “Don't you realise that we do things differently nowadays? Our patients inject four times a day allowing them to eat what they like when they like.”
    “That is what DAFNE (Dose Adjustment for Normal Eating, devised by Professor Stephanie Amiel at King's College Hospital) is about, and in 1998 Stephanie Amiel wrote me a very sympathetic letter, understanding my reasons for not wishing to start DAFNE.”
    “What were they?”
    “Chiefly that at the age of 41, I am trying not to put on weight, and being on the Lawrence Line Weight diet has kept me in trim up to the present day.”
    “But that is not how we do things now.”
    “Listen, so far you have not given me any concrete reason for switching, other than fashion.”
    The way he addressed me irritated me so much that when I got home I wrote a long complaint to Peter Watkins. He sent a charming letter back, assuring me that he had spoken to the junior doctor. On the next visit I was seen by Peter who told me that the young man was suitably contrite. Suddenly I felt pity for him. Peter said “When our patients are upset by the way they are received, we have to deal with it appropriately.” As I left the clinic via W.H. Smith, who should be coming the other direction? He just said “Hi.” I hope he has progressed into a first class diabetologist now.
    Have a healthy 2020!
    Grant
     
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  16. porl69

    porl69 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    The guillotine....OUCH
     
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  17. Tonto73

    Tonto73 · Member

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    Great memories ( or not so great ). Been type one since 1977, a test pilot for u100, a computerised dose calculator and yes that was DOS with a huge desktop PC from the university, first insulin pump in 1986 ( Nordisk Infuser ); you could change the dose with a screwdriver and the butterfly cannula “stabbed” every time you bent over. I remember Rand Rocket glass syringes, alcohol sterilisation, the evil Autolet and urine chemistry sets that fizzed and got hot. ( kind of exciting when you are 4 years old).

    Fresca and Diet Pepsi or water were the only options ( TAB was awful IMHO ) Jackson’s of Devon sweets and Orbit were the only “allowed” sweets. And everything was measured in Bread units or egg sized potatoes.

    Thankfully my parents didn’t let Diabetes slow me down and the British Diabetic Association and my Consultant ( Dr Peter Swift at LGH ) made sure Summer Camps were a real adventure with education, adventure and safety.

    These days I have a smart pump, CGM, ultra fast insulin, 4 kids, all my extremities, good vision, a motorbike for my adventuring and a job that takes me round the globe. I spend my work days designing smart drug delivery systems and patient engagement solutions.

    I know I’m lucky and my condition is stable and for some people it’s a tough journey; but it is so much easier to live with today than 40+ years ago. Bruises all over arms and legs from horse (elephant) needles, scabby fingertips and endless hospital visits ( not all scheduled ) are a distant memory.

    Many thanks to the discovery of insulin and the first human injection in 1922. Also all the ongoing work in Pharma and MedTech to make life easier for all of us living with ( owning ) diabetes. A big thanks to what was the British Diabetic Association, now Diabetes UK for all the good you have done and continue to do.

    Hopefully there will be a vaccine one day - in the mean time, cautiously, PARTY ON! Or for the less gregarious “Keep on Keeping On” ;-).
     
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  18. Grant_Vicat

    Grant_Vicat Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Here it is:
    Sorry, can't upload for some reason.
     
  19. porl69

    porl69 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Just the 86k for me lol Screenshot_20191107-105638_Outlook.jpeg
     
  20. Tonto73

    Tonto73 · Member

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    Had one of those ;-). Worked quite well. I believe they were made by Owen Mumford who also made the AutoLet in a 3 fold case with no where for the “BM” ( Boehringer Mannheim ) strips. LOL.
     
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