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Backsliding!

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by CDudley, Apr 30, 2016.

  1. CDudley

    CDudley Type 2 · Active Member

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    Hi all,

    When I was first diagnosed I was so much in shock that I radically changed everything as I thought I was gonna die. Since two months ago I havent been given any follow up and have just been left to take my medication, which I do successfully with no problems, and to visit to test again in June (4 month review). Since my blood sugar has stabilised, I've gone back to eating badly and I need your help to help me get back on track. I've lost motivation coz now I don't feel like I'm dying. What is this bad food doing to my internal organs? Maybe the shock will get me back on track again?
     
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  2. KevinPotts

    KevinPotts Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi CDudley, the last thing I want to do is "shock" you. It is vital to remember however that without a permanent lifestyle change the progressive nature of diabetes T2, may lead to death 10 years prior to the average and numerous accompanying challenges, not least of which include blindness, amputation, stroke, heart attack etc. CDudley it sounds like you have managed to gain positive control of your BG, so just making that personal commitment to a lifestyle change can, lead to what the published evidence suggests is 10 years of extended life beyond the average mortality rate. Cut the carbs, eat protein, lots of good fat, plenty of water - you'll feel satisfied and soon find your enjoying a new found sense of making the right decisions.
     
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    #2 KevinPotts, Apr 30, 2016 at 9:32 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: May 1, 2016
  3. urbanracer

    urbanracer Type 1 · Well-Known Member
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    I find that a rather odd comment @CDudley . I take it then that you enjoyed that feeling and you want to get back there? That's probably where you're heading if you don't get back on the wagon.
     
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  4. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    Hi. The problem with T2 is that it is a silent destroyer of the body; do you want that. So, follow Kevinpott's advice re diet and make it a change for life.
     
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  5. satkins

    satkins Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    This is what I found with my self. I only comment as I've also fell off the wagon a few times.

    I googled symptoms of diabetes and recognized that I've experienced a few of them. Not severe but then my sugars where not really high yet. This just reminds me that I don't want to feel like that any more. Still doesn't help with what to have for supper but there are tonnes of sites with low carb ideas. The biggest thing since starting my low carb diet is that I don't have heart burn any more. I was popping antacids all day (at least 3 to 4 a day) and a Zantac every morning.
     
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  6. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    Have a read up on diabetic burnout. Very very common.
    I've had diabetes for decades. I can honestly say I'm still on a rollercoaster.
    You know, a lot of it is down to your personality too.
    A sadate calm person has an advantage to putting diabetes in remission. Calm controlled dietary changes at first can be all that's needed. Forever.
    Now me! I have a problem with forever. Forever sounds boring and dull and the same. Boy, if you know me those words have never described me.
    My aim is to except forever and rollercoaster but with just some variants. I am variant. That is who I am and trying to change my personality and dna is too big a task so variant in a rollercoaster is fine for me.
    Are you a person who cannot endure same same same forever?
    Give yourself a break and have a customised rollercoaster but a healthy one.
    Allow yourself a treat. Don't let yourself feel deprived or different.
    We are pack animals so we like to eat together. Tweek what you choose to eat because yes you're diabetic but no one is expecting you to be a saint.
    Life is for living. Especially those extra ten yrs you're entitled to. :)
     
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  7. CDudley

    CDudley Type 2 · Active Member

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    How is that an odd comment? I've already written that the motivation for me to change was that I thought I was going to die if I didn't make changes. Because DT2 is a silent killer, I don't feel like I'm dying ie there is no pain or twinge or anything. And no that doesn't mean I want it but because I don't feel anything it's like I can ignore it is even there at all and so not motivated now. I want people to tell me the bad stuff as that will get me back to where I should be, changing. Your comment isn't helpful at all. I wanted advice and your comment wasn't advice.
     
  8. KevinPotts

    KevinPotts Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Last year 7000 people in the UK had leg amputations specifically as a result of T2..... Does that help
     
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  9. Miketyson2007

    Miketyson2007 Type 2 · Member

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    Hi mate last thing you need is a lecture even if unintended I have had type 2 about 8 years and have had times when i have fallen off the wagon know how you feel.
    At the moment im trying to get back to good control watching diet and out running.
    The worst thing can be you dont feel ill.
    I have felt fine and checked my and it has been 18 equally felt rough and checked and its been in the 5's!
    It can be very hard keep your chin up mate
     
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  10. Finsky

    Finsky Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    I don't think there is much we can say about chocking things that you don't already know about...by feeling quilty or knowing you've been 'eating badly' you are fully aware what you already are doing to yourself.
    But as for helping you gather you motivation crumbs back together...we certainly can help you with that...or try to..;)
    So...what are you weaknesses..what foods are your fall?
    Maybe starting with changing one thing from you plate at the time for something 'more suitable' or leaving it out altogether? Could you stretch the gap between your meals little longer...allowing your insulin levels to come down?
    Maybe you could give us idea of typical daily foods you eat? Sometimes you don't really need to do any drastic changes to make things better.
    I knew for yeeeeears that I wasn't doing well and should do better..but now that I've found my 'key' to better control of my health..I'm so encouraged to succeed. The improvement itself is fuelling me to carry on..scare tactics won't...they just make you feel down and depressed.
     
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    #10 Finsky, May 1, 2016 at 4:32 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: May 1, 2016
  11. MargJ

    MargJ Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I too have fallen off the wagon this week. After a year of being very good, I am in the house alone while my husband is in hospital. It's too easy to have a take away or a ready meal. Like you, I know I am damaging myself but feel past caring. I tell myself I will start again once John comes home. We know we have to do it, but sometimes stress or other factors might cause these slips. We're human!
     
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  12. hankjam

    hankjam Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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  13. AndBreathe

    AndBreathe I reversed my Type 2 · Expert
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    How about this for a slightly different way of looking at it: in my experience, both personally and professionally, folks don't tend to make sustained changes to prevent something, because you have no way of measuring success, only failure.

    How about setting yourself shor terms goals you can readily assess you have achieved or not. Math at could be to get your average daily score, from testing down from X to y? If that's what you decide is a goal, make the goal achievable in the time you set. So, perhaps average down from 8 to 6 perhaps, rather than 18 to 4 within 7 days.

    Once the short term has expired, review and adjust the target or your behaviour, and keep doing that until you get where you want to be. Thereafter, you can set targets for the slightly longer term, like average 30 day blood score, or weight loss or time spent walking, or whatever.

    Anything in there of use?
     
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  14. CDudley

    CDudley Type 2 · Active Member

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    I'm different to everyone else I'm afraid. I need scare tactics to keep me on track. The most helpful advice on here are the ones scaring me - we're all different. I eat well and healthily for my three meals of the day but I love sweets and crisps, thats my downfall and as I can get them pretty much everywhere I like, I find that tough to avoid. I dont understand 'just have a little bit' either, that doesnt work with me. I dont eat cakes or chocolate or biscuits, so thats not a problem or chips.
     
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  15. CDudley

    CDudley Type 2 · Active Member

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    Hi thanks for your advice but I simply am only motivated by the negatives - we are all different. I do run. I do the 0-5K on Tuesdays and Sundays. On Saturdays I do Park run and am on my 10th run so can get a Tshirt! I walk 15mins to work and from work so 30mins a day. This is not motivating me, i just do it coz I have to. health and long term goals are not any motivation to stop eating sweets and crisps I'm afraid, I just do it coz I have to. Running a marathon does not motivate me in the slightest - but well done you for trying it.
     
  16. CDudley

    CDudley Type 2 · Active Member

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    How about setting yourself short terms goals you can readily assess you have achieved or not.
    I do but then after two weeks I have a blow out and eat all I want for a week.


    Once the short term has expired, review and adjust the target or your behaviour, and keep doing that until you get where you want to be.
    Sounds wonderful but I have no emotion regulation and not alot of self control

    Thereafter, you can set targets for the slightly longer term, like average 30 day blood score, or weight loss or time spent walking, or whatever.
    I do think ahead but what do I do when Im driving passed a shop and have a craving?
     
  17. AndBreathe

    AndBreathe I reversed my Type 2 · Expert
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    Could the blow out be on low carb foods? Do you have anything you really, really enjoy when you're "being good"?

    What do you to when you're driving past a shop and having a craving? You do one of two things; keep driving to your destination and/or (depending on whether the craving abates) then have your " 'mergency rations". In my early days, and to an extent still, my 'mergency rations was a smallish pack of roasted, salted peanuts. They taste nice (to me anyway), are in a portion sized pack and I can keep them in various places - glove box, handbag, cupboard, desk drawer for examples, and never be without.

    There's no real magic to this, unfortunately. If there was we'd weave the spell for you.
     
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  18. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    @CDudley what would you find the worst thing to happen to you? Blindness, inability to walk or depression. Maybe all 3?
    Just think outside the box.
    The people who can no longer function properly won't be jumping on here to tell you all about it. They carn't.
    A life without being able to interact on-line due to severe depression or no sight or no energy would affect me. You?
     
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  19. catapillar

    catapillar Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    You sound like you are pretty self aware. & as you are asking for scare stories I am sure you are well aware of the possible consequences of poor diabetic management.

    If you feel like you don't have tools to control behaviours which you know to be unhealthy & that you would rather not do, perhaps you could consider seeing a health psychologist for some therapy & advice on tools that will work to motivate your particular personality type.
     
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  20. CDudley

    CDudley Type 2 · Active Member

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    Yes, I'd love to see a psychologist but unfortunately they cost way too much and I can't afford one. they won't give me one on the NHS.
     
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