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"Best" things doctors have said to you

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by tigger, Jun 25, 2015.

  1. TheBigNewt

    TheBigNewt Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    [QUOTE="NoKindOfSusie, post: 1719131, member: 441787
    What the hell do you want from me.[/QUOTE]
    You either control the disease or let the disease control you. Your choice. A lot of us have done the former. Sounds like you've embraced the latter.
     
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  2. NoKindOfSusie

    NoKindOfSusie Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Er yeah ok the problem is that's complete nonsense isn't it.

    If I could control it the meter would always give me perfect numbers, it doesn't, neither does yours.

    This is part of that tradition of saying things that are obviously not true, thanks for the insult, I am not that stupid, AND NONE OF THIS IS MY FAULT.
     
  3. Grumpy ole thing

    Grumpy ole thing Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @NoKindOfSusie, perhaps you might consider what you want from us? You have said you are newly diagnosed, less than a year so far; it takes longer than that to get to grips with a new job. Many people on here have tried to help you, most have years if not decades of experience but you choose not to believe anyone. No one can fix it, no one can say magic words to make it go away, its a shame but there it is, we're stuck with it. I for one will not sit around waiting to die.
     
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  4. Draco16

    Draco16 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I do have lots of sympathy as T1s a big deal, difficult and definitely a big life negative! Agree we can’t fully control only manage / mitigate.

    But that last sentence!!! Omg!

    If you chose to listen to thousands of endocrinologists rather than one dsn you would realise that 5-7 is not a must range all the time and stop beating yourself up with the bizarre fixation with this range.
    If you could manage your relationship with your diabetes team better you would have access to better insulins that wouldn’t make you feel sick.
    You bizarrely won’t get a libre even though you have the funds as you’re waiting for some weird permission from diabetic team, when it’s being advertised on tv to the masses right now.
    You won’t experiment a tiny bit with diet and insulin to enable you to exercise.
    You think your life is over. While i agree it won’t be as good as it could have been, it won’t be so far off if you decide you want to go for it.

    So errr, I think quite a lot of things are your fault here!

    But all these easily changed. You’ve got a great basis of good control. And yes only a few months in, you’re doing well, but yes somethings are your fault currently; you’re making it so much harder for yourself mentally and physically!
     
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  5. NoKindOfSusie

    NoKindOfSusie Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm not seeing any good reason to keep talking about this and I don't want to be accused of deraiking the thread or whatever so just carry on.
     
  6. dancer

    dancer Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @NoKindOfSusie you're right, it isn't your fault. You are stressed about your diabetes, who wouldn't be?

    It will take time to get used to the Type 1 way of life, and acceptance of it, warts and all.

    Perhaps you've had an unfortunate experience at the clinic. Maybe someone has, in one way or another, said that it's your fault your BGs are out with your target. I know that 5 weeks to the day after diagnosis, a junior doctor walked into the room, looking at my notes, and said, "You've been cheating in your diet." I was stunned and couldn't believe anyone could say that to me.

    That, along with a couple of other episodes at clinic, has given me a great distrust of doctors at the clinic. I really hope you haven't gone through bad situations like that.

    As others have said, you can aim for a target of 5 - 7 but it is only a target. You could be lower or even hypo, due to exercise, or even for no particular reason. You could be higher because you're coming down with something, you've had a different type of exercise, you've eaten something different (or more than intended) or for no apparent reason.

    Try and relax and be kind to yourself. No one can expect perfect BGs all the time.

    There is a lot of trial and error in our diabetic lives, until we find what works for us. That will work for a while but then it won't and the trial and error starts again

    You will get used to it, e.g. you will get used to planning for exercise (lowering bolus and/or basal insulin) BUT IT WILL TAKE TIME.

    Give yourself a break and don't expect perfection. Yes you might get complications, but you might not. I'll have my 40th diabetes birthday later this year and am still going strong. You can only do your best, trying to follow advice. Sometimes it will work, sometimes it won't.

    It took me two years to accept my situation. There was a lot of anger, distrust and crying into my pillow at night, but I got there in the end. You will too!
     
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  7. Deleted Account

    Deleted Account · Guest

    The most bizarre thing I have been told in relation to diabetes was by a not very slim locum consultant at my annual review.
    He told me to watch what I eat because, in the last year since my last review, my BMI had crept up ... from 21.5 to 22.
    Even ignoring whether this was fat or muscle, the increase was small, it was still well within what is considered the healthy range and it felt horrible to be judged by someone who clearly did not follow his own advice.
     
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  8. Bic

    Bic Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I have been living with T1 for nearly 40 years and heard all sorts of rubbish.
    1. Doctor: Rice is a high GI food, you shouldn't have it often.
    Me: I don't, but for the opposite reason: it makes me go hypo. [because it takes a lot to get assimilated with me, and I gather this is not entirely unheard of…] See, it is all noted down in my diary. (I show her the data. At the time I was using a diary as there were no meters with downloadable data)
    Doctor: No, it's impossible. Can't be like that, you should have been forgeing your data.
    Me: I can think of several better ways of wasting my time…

    2. A never-seen-before doctor (without looking at me): Well… You should definitely quit smoking.
    Me: Only… [was starting to say: Only, I never smoked in my life!]
    N-s-b doctor: Please do not interrupt me! And I see you travel a lot for business, so you will find it difficult to eat healthily…
    Me: Actually, I… [I work as an editor from my home, cook all my meals myself and am a nearly-vegetarian]
    N-s-b doctor: Stop interrupting me! Oh, and this: prostatitis. That won't make things easier, especially as you're in the habit of drinking a little too much, I see…
    Me: What the… [I have been a teetotaller for ages]
    N-s-b doctor: Will you let me speak, once and for all? – Finally raising his head and seeing… me. A woman, of an entirely different age from that written on the record, and looking rather amused.
    Me: I'll forget all the embarassing details about whoever it was, provided you find out my own record and discuss my case, ok?

    3. Usually, when I go to the diabetes clinic my doctor downloads the data from my meter, it takes a couple of seconds and then we proceed to talk about everything, adjust therapy and so on. Once, though, she was ill and I had to meet another doc. Same age of the former, by the way.
    Doc: Why didn't you bring your diary? Forgot?
    Me (putting my meter on the table): I don't use a diary, I just bring my meter and Dr. ** downloads the data.
    Doc (fiddling with my meter as it was some puzzling thing from outer space): Why didn't you bring a print, then?
    Me: The meter is far too old to fit my own computer. It will only work with those you have here at the clinic, I'm afraid…
    Doc: Why don't you use a newer one, then? It would help if you could see the charts on your own PC, you know? And print them.
    Me: It surely would, but if I bought a newer meter, then the NHS would not pay for its newer stripes, and I cannot afford them. [we have a strict policy on what kind of stripes are to be paid by the NHS, in Italy]
    Doc: Well, I can't lose time with all this downloading… You come back some other time and you will bring all your data written on your diary: hour, BG records, time of day, every single thing you eat, every single thing you do, medicines, colds, flus, weather conditions, every single time you get angry or depressed, every…
    He's probably still going on and on and on; as for me, I got up and left. Diabetes doctor, or CIA spook? (But: one who can't even manage a meter from the 1990s?)
     
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  9. RAPS_od

    RAPS_od Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I was diagnosed T1 in 1969 and was told a cure was "just around the corner." When 20 years had passed, I gave up hope. I can live with diabetes, but hope just messes me up. I'd rather face the fact that I'm a T1.
    I was also told I'd have a shortened lifespan (wouldn't see 30 - I was 12), I'd probably have an amputation or two, I'd most likely be on dialysis (did I want to see the machine?), and that I shouldn't EVER be pregnant.
    I'm 62 now and I've had brittle T1 for 50 years. They always write "uncontrolled" on my charts, as if I don't take care of myself without realizing how volatile my sugars are. I hate that whatever shape my diabetes is in, it's always my fault - because I have diabetes.
     
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  10. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    I don't think I have mentioned this before as I thought no one would believe it, but after having read this thread -

    My doctor phoned up the week after my blood test was done and asked me to come to see him a couple of weeks in the future.
    Nothing to worry about, he said, just a routine follow up.
    The appointment was to tell me I was 'a very bad diabetic'.
    He gave me a prescription for medication, no other advice or information.
    Good thing it was nothing important.
     
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  11. Seacrow

    Seacrow LADA · Well-Known Member

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    Oooh, I got one. When I was a student at university, the GP told me that period pain was entirely due to feminine hysteria, and if I could think clearly and logically I would see there was no reason to be in pain.
     
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  12. endocrinegremlin

    endocrinegremlin Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    When I was diagnosed and for maybe five years after (? i think) dietitians and consultants were adamant that I could not have strawberry yogurt. Any other flavour you like but not strawberry. It was too sweet. Despite the label saying it had the same carb value as all the other flavours? Luckily, while other kids were banned by worried parents, my t1 mum was like lolwtf yogurt is good and if you are wiling to have one, have at it.
     
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  13. endocrinegremlin

    endocrinegremlin Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Sadly, agree.

    First GP dismissed my pain as period pain. Rotation around the surgery and a lot of pain later....no. Endometriosis.
     
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  14. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    He was joking.... right?
    (I know you're not but what a muppet, that GP.)
     
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  15. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Moderator
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    The 'feminine hysteria' idea was prevalent around 150 years ago (Victorian doctors). Very widespread.
    Absolutely horrible to discover that a doc was still spouting such drivel as recently as @Seacrow was told it
    - sorry Seacrow, no idea how old you are, or when you heard this, but the fact that it happened is bad enough.
     
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  16. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    I got told recently to not cradle my extremely painful upper arm due to the trapped nerve in my neck.
    OK after Amitripyline through the night and ibuprofen rub all over neck and arm I could move it with hugely less pain but 2 months of exercising and heavy usage due to being my right arm/hand it still makes me cry without sporadic Amitripyline and my normal dihydrocodeine plus paracetamol.
    GP was right but at the time you question whether he's correct. I just wanted to cuddle my arm in cotton wool and hope for the best. Crying as I went.
    It was more painful than childbirth.
    I felt so vunerable and desperate. I would have tried anything to relieve it.
    I think my GP approached it correctly. I can move it now but still not over my head on bad days.

    I wonder why bad days occur. I did everything text book quality.

    Ive found my nerves are very vunerable in the heat or cold. No arthritis just diabetes.
    Problems even in good numbers for my glucose.
    Luckily I can see a light as t the end of my tunnel. Bariatric surgery due to severe obesity.
     
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  17. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    Yep, medieval.
     
  18. gemma_T1

    gemma_T1 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I think we must have met the same doctor!!!! Did you go to uni in Manchester by any chance? I was told something similar ... that I was basically pathetic ( he said much worse) for complaining about period pain ... I put up with years of unbearable pain and then 8 years after seeing the doctor in Manchester I collapsed in the street whilst on my lunch break from work, a passerby called an ambulance and I was taken to casualty. I had a laparoscopy the next day and was diagnosed with endometriosis.
    I have had so many bad experiences with doctors, gynecologists etc. I could write a book.
    My first ever dietitian, (after years of diabetes) who must have recently been qualified, perhaps younger than me at the time, met me for the first time and decided to shout and swear at me and then declare that I was impossible to deal with, probably because she was telling me to eat many more carbs than I thought was good for me. I had always dealt well with diabetes in my own way with not many carbs at meals etc. My grandmother had had diabetes and my mum was a good cook and didn’t believe in lots of carbs unless it was potatoes ( she was Irish) I also didn’t want to inject loads of insulin as I didn’t want to put on weight, so for me small meals and 1 or 2 units max was fine. I was very polite about it, but she was totally out of control. I wish I had reported her. At the time I was a masters student and after having been asked what I ate for lunch, I said that I usually missed it as I had lectures during lunchtime, so I usually had a couple of midget gems or a Lollipop to keep me up as by lunchtime I was usually 4 and would be hypo by the end of the lectures without them. Her reaction was completely over the top, and I mean totally crazy ( she should have been sacked) she even said, you really want to swear at me now, don’t you? To which I replied she was doing enough swearing for both of usand I wasn’t one to swear anyway... I think the calmer I was, the worse she got...
    I was 24 years old, type one, slim, sporty and busy during the day, so I did what I could in order to not disturb lectures and be able to take notes, keep my sugar levels up and not go hypo. These were the days when there were no pumps to make life easier with reduced basal, just fixed night insulin and then multiple injections and a couple of midget gems kept me from hypo-ing.
    My Hba1c wasn’t perfect but was always around 6.5, which they’d always been happy with.
    Crazy lady!!! I’ve never forgotten her.
     
  19. bootyful0

    bootyful0 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    The best thing a doctor ever said to me was
    " YOU BETTER NOT DIE, BECAUSE IT'S GONNA LOOK BAD ON MY CV"

    In her defence it was funny and I literally laughed until I felt better :wacky:
     
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  20. Robbity

    Robbity Type 2 · Expert

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    Just after Christmas I had to see a (temporary) GP as I needed some painkillers for a bad case of weeping oedema. She went trotting off to ask for advice, and came back with a prescription for me - fine...
    But then she told me I also needed to have a blood test to check my HbA1c because I was at risk of diabetes!
    Me: " o_O Errrm - but I've actually had T2 diabetes for over five years."

    I suppose I should have been happy that I've been able to keep things reasonably well enough under control over that time for my HbA1c results to give her that impression... And after I got over the :***: shock, it did give me a much needed laugh and cheer me up no end!

    Robbity
     
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