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"Best" things doctors have said to you

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by tigger, Jun 25, 2015.

  1. MoonSpirit

    MoonSpirit Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    If you get the opportunity, move to somewhare like Spain.
    Like you diabetic and Asthma and regular chest infections
    It's the UK (and for me even worse Jersey) climate.
    I'm now 90% of the time in Spain, warm dry air, the Asthma 90% disappears with a week of arriving, never use either of my inhalers at all while in Spain or south France, everytime I return back home I'm back on inhalers with 24 hours.
     
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  2. tigger

    tigger Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Nurse at the retinopathy clinic after I'd just received the first letter ever saying I had background retinopathy in one eye looking through machine at my eyes.

    Nurse: I can see your diabetes has been very bad
    Me: My control is good (hba1c turned out to be 6.2 but I didn't know this at the time). Are you going to give me more details about the letter I've received about background retinopathy?
    Nurse: You will receive another letter.

    (I go to sob in the toilets)

    Finally see consultant 6 months later.

    Consultant looks at eyes then looks at me and notices I'm wearing glasses.
    Consultant: What's your prescription
    Me: -8 and -6
    Him: and do you have astigmatism?
    Me: Yes
    Him: That's what came up on the scan you don't have any retinopathy.

    I assume she was that rude because I am about 40 years younger than most who attend that clinic because I have type 1 and have had diabetes for considerably longer than most of them too.

    Next misdiagnosis. Thoroughly cheerful scanner "yes you've definitely got retinopathy, I'll send these off and if they disagree they'll have an aribtration (I'm a lawyer and my mind starts going through the usual arbitration routes I use and thinking they don't apply) but I'll be right. Then hands me a booklet from RNIB which I interpret to mean I'll be blind by the time I'm 35 (30 at the time) will lose the right to drive (having only passed a year before and started to really enjoy driving). Get very depressed.

    Get seen by a doctor in eye hospital about 6 months later. She looks at my eyes and says:

    It's just a strong retinal reflex. Sometimes they come up funny on the pictures. There's no retinopathy.

    Since those 2 experience I now don't believe a word any scanner or nurse says about my eyes.

    My parents were told the 10 year cure thing when I was diagnosed in 1983..... When my friend's brother was diagnosed in 1997 she said to me "it's ok they've said there'll be a cure in 10 years". I didn't have the heart to point out they were already 4 years over on that estimate with me. Whenever I see chuggers at stations trying to raise money for cures for diabetes usually with claims of 10 years I get very very angry and have to give them a wide berth to prevent launching into a diatribe that this is a big lie. IMHO I'm not sure there ever will be a cure because diabetes medication has become such big business it's not in the drug companies' interest to have one. That's my cynical view after 32 years of type 1.
     
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  3. tigger

    tigger Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    And on print outs of blood tests......

    When I joined a new GP surgery the GP chased me for ages to get my hba1c results because the hospital and GP despite being in the same trust can't communicate. I told him and he was very happy as it was below 7 so they get more funding for my hard work. He then suggested that I have the hba1c done at the surgery as it would be easier for me. I thought I'd give it a go as a fasting test (even though I had a consultant for years who said just eat breakfast and lie) is better done closer to home than going to the hospital which is further and at that time had a long queue. So I gave it a go. The test itself was ok but when it came to getting the result as I didn't trust the GP to send to the hospital I called up to find what it was. First I was told it was normal (ie below 7)and they wouldn't tell me what it was as the GP had to tell me. He did. Then I asked for a print out. The nurse had told me that when I did this to make sure to emphasise to the receptionist that it was for an nhs appointment.

    Me: I need a print out of the blood results for an nhs appointment at xxxx
    Receptionist: That will be £5
    Me: The nurse told me that if it was for an NHS appointment there's no charge.
    Receptionist: That will be £5
    Me: OK

    Mental process: OK if they're not giving in on this I'll pay £5 do all my tests at the hospital and the next time the GP calls asking for my results my response will be "That will be £5 please". I should make back the cost quite quickly :)

    Nurse calls me back and apologises and assures me it won't cost anything and it didn't so I didn't need to go to those lengths.

    New surgery, same discussion about getting results and suggestion that I do the blood test there.

    I turn up at reception after work on way home and ask for a print out. The receptionist starts the print out and then says:

    Receptionist: That will be 72p a sheet.
    Me: It's for an NHS appointment
    Receptionist: There's still a charge.
    Me: I only had the blood test done here because dr x specifically requested it. I can get it done at x instead. Please let her know that if I have to pay for it I won't do anymore here and I won't communicate the results to you which I understand has a funding impact.
    Receptionist: That's nothing to do with me. It's 72p a sheet.
    Me: Ok. I don't want it. I'm going to the hospital and I'll get another one done there.
    Receptionist: But I've already printed out the sheets.
    Me: You didn't tell me you would charge me for something I shouldn't be charged for before doing so and I'm not payng for it.
    Receptionist: I'll have to check with my manager.
    Me: Please do.

    She goes off, checks and I get the print out for free.

    Last time I did a blood test at that surgery.

    My now retired consultant used to have little cards you'd keep which he'd fill in with your hba1c, any other bloods, weight, blood pressure etc. This was mainly because the hospital lost notes on a regular basis so he could never guarantee they'd be there at any appointment. Patients were more reliable. My current one has offered me a print out for free.
     
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  4. lizdeluz

    lizdeluz Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    At recent clinic appointment, my consultant told me my hbA1c was 61. I asked for a printout of all the usual results, but the consultant showed me that her computer wouldn't allow a printout. So I scribbled down the results she read off to me.

    I went to my GP about 3 weeks later to tell him I had decided to stop taking statins. As an aside, I asked him for a printout of my last hbA1c blood test. He printed it off there and then, and congratulated me on my hbA1c of 51.

    So it's always worth looking at the printout yourself. :):banghead:
     
  5. prancer53

    prancer53 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    My husband thinks I must be hypo or something as I did laugh out loud when I read this----so, so funny!!!!!
     
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  6. prancer53

    prancer53 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    But so funny--this would make an ideal scenario for a comedy......!!!!
     
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  7. prancer53

    prancer53 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I had similar at aged 8--mum took me backwards and forwards to GP. His diagnosis: that my mother should feed me!! I was only 2 stone and was hungry and ate all the time. No wee test was offered & my mum had no idea what was wrong--which is why we kept on visiting the GP. Eventually school got school doctor to give me a medical as they were very worried about me. I was admitted to hospital within 24 hours after seeing her. GP got into trouble and it turned out that he didn't believe that children got ill. Apparently I would have been dead in another 2 weeks were it not for the school doctor. (type 1 now for 54 years and thriving)!!!
     
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  8. maisiepug

    maisiepug Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    The nurses at my GP's surgery need to either go back to basics for learning to read or get some new glasses, one told me my BMI was 76 instead of 46 (still too high I know but working on it) and another one told me a couple of weeks ago that my weight was 18st instead of 15st.
     
  9. prancer53

    prancer53 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Last time I had retinopathy check was odd. Dr told me he could see retinopathy in my eyes but not to worry because it had healed. I have had these checks for very many years now (I took part in the research for the cameras now used, way back in the eighties too) and not once has retinopathy been diagnosed. Obviously I have never had laser treatment either so no "healing" has ever taken place or could my body have healed retinopathy and then no doc ever picked it up? I said nothing--I have had 54 years of stupid remarks--BUT then it got worse. Doc said I had thinning of the optic nerve in my left eye and that I must have noticed considerable worsening of my eye sight. I assured him that my eyesight had not changed at all and that the nurse, prior to consultation, had remarked on how well I did on eye test. He told me he wanted to see me soon for further tests with regard to optic nerve and then remarked that my eyesight must make it very difficult to carry out my job !!!! When I saw DSN she told me retinopathy check report stated "no retinopathy" and there was no mention re optic nerve either--could this have been a Kevin/ Bernard scenario, I wonder?
     
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  10. prancer53

    prancer53 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Silly things said by docs, nurses, dietician:

    GP: You became hypo after eating a slice of cake because your body produced extra insulin as a result (type 1 for 54 years & obviously on insulin for 54 years--maybe if I ate high cho, sugary foods etc all the time I would be cured because it would stimulate my pancreas into producing insulin) !!!!!????--job done--it would save the NHS a fortune).
    DSN: What would you prefer next time HBA1C or glucose tolerance test (I bet the latter is cheaper--never mind its lack of appropriateness)!!!!!!!!!
    DIETICIAN: Do you know how much cho is in a slice of bread? ME: 2/3 oz = 10g cho DIETICIAN: 10g = what? (turned out she thought I was talking about 10g weight in spite of specifity of my answer--obviously not listening, was she)? There followed a long protracted conversation in an effort to establish facts. DIETICIAN: How many grams (weight) is in 2/3 oz of bread? ME: Look it up (had had enough by that time)!! DIETICIAN: Do you do any exercise? ME: I teach GCSE & A Level dance in a school so every day I do warm ups and practical dance exercises with each of 6 classes, that is at least 30 hours a week of exercise. END OF INTERVIEW !!!!
    NURSE:
    (Who was a chunky monkey) you have put on weight (1/2 kilo in 3 months which made me 58 1/2 kilos)---there then followed a lecture on what I should do to lose the excessive weight!!!!!!!
    CONSULTANT: I know about clinical aspects of diabetes--you only know how to manage it (thought that was my responsibility--he shouted that out too--I obviously irritated him....)!!!!
    CONSULTANT: Oh dear what are you eating? Lets have a look at your HBA1C shall we? (his face fell as it was within the normal range--we moved on to another aspect of diabetes!!) I take animal insulin so eat 20g cho mid morning and afternoon otherwise hypos occur)
    GP: No point bringing in a wee sample as it will be full of sugar--as I handed him a bottle--he tested it anyway--it was NAD- (
    EVERY DOC/ NURSE etc: you will of course pick up infections far more easily because of high blood sugars. ME: No MEDIC: When were you last off work because of illness? ME: 10 years ago MEDIC: in hospital because of diabetes? ME: Never
    GP: You have metabolic syndrome ME: I always understood that I had an auto immune disorder

    Most of these remarks are annoying because a) the medic hasn't listened to my answer to his/ her question b) their statements are presumptive with regard to my behaviour/ compliance (or lack of) without having read my notes or checked the validity of their own statements and c) I swear that they make up what they say to make it seem as though they know what they are talking about (see point b).

    I get extremely annoyed now because (of my age supposedly) conversations about diabetes, with medics, are referred to as though I have type 2. So forthcoming statements and advice are irrelevant.

    Why does no one ever ask how much insulin you take or how much cho you eat? Those used to be the opening questions every time you saw a doctor & can explain why sugar is lower or higher etc etc etc.
     
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  11. prancer53

    prancer53 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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  12. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Expert
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    Because they now expect everyone to be using a basal bolus regime where this is considered to be much less of an issue. As a result, there is little point in answering, as someone might be eating 500g of sugar a day, taking 100u of insulin to cover it and have a normal Hba1C. In spite of this not being terribly clever.

    On twice daily, or some of the animal insulins, it is a much more important conversation.
     
  13. pinewood

    pinewood Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm seen by the diabetes clinic at the hospital but also get my HBA1c done at my GP practice and I also have the same thing about paying for print outs that other people have reported. I don't mind paying, it's just the red tape if it all that annoys me.

    This is how it goes for me: have my blood test, get a call a week later telling me the result is "normal". I ask for the exact number and get told only the doctor can tell me my number and usually get a lecture asking why I want to know because "if it's normal it's normal". I have to insist and then wait for a GP to call me (wasting both their time and my time) to tell me my number. Then when I go in for my next appointment and ask for a print out of my hba1c and my cholesterol results and I'm told it's £3.50. I say okay, don't worry then, I'll just write the results down (didn't have cash on me and they didn't take cards). She said no, you aren't allowed to write them down in case you don't understand them! So utterly nonsensical and ridiculous.
     
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  14. dawnmc

    dawnmc Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I think these should be printed off, made into a book and given to all Gp's and nurses. Its just no joke really the treatment doled out - even if they are a funny read.
     
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  15. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    I'd lost a lot of weight despite increasing my food intake a lot and I was worried. I saw the nurse and she confidently told me that I wasn't eating enough! I'd actually been incredibly hungry and had even eaten fish and chips as an afternoon snack. I tried to tell her how much I was eating but she cut me off and said "Well, you must be getting that wrong. It's obvious you're not eating enough because you've lost weight - that proves it".

    A couple of weeks later I was taken to hospital by ambulance and diagnosed with Type 1. :rolleyes:
     
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  16. CarbsRok

    CarbsRok Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    My mum took me to the GP after seeing me stand on tip toe at the age of 4 to drain the taps as so thirsty. She knew there was a family history of diabetes so took a urine sample along as well.
    GP told her she was an over anxious mother to be (6 months pregnant with little brother) and to stop fussing and wasting his time as I was far to young to have diabetes but if she insisted to drop in a urine sample when next passing. Mum handed over the urine sample the GP couldn't stop apologising as he closed the surgery and drove mum and I to the hospital with a slight detour to the fire station to tell my Dad who was on duty at the time. That was 50 years ago.
     
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  17. andi140373

    andi140373 Type 1 · Active Member

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    My most memorable (to me aged 15 and my Mum) when I was diagnosed at the GP surgery - 'I don't know how you got here today but you should be dead young lady'
    I was immediately hospitalised and two days later moved to a hospital with specialist diabetes care but they didn't tell my Mum so she turned up to visit and managed to arrive just as they were trying to resuscitate an elderly woman (Mum assumed it was me) who had taken my bed

    During my second pregnancy at the diabetic antenatal clinic, I explained to the endocrinologist that I was using the TBR on my insulin pump to try and lower my morning levels, the percentage increases I was needing and the ratio changes, corrections etc etc. After explaining everything his reply was 'You sound like you know what you are doing but I didn't understand a word you just said, let me find someone who deals with pump users'. In big red capital letters on the front of my file it said 'pump trained consultants only'.

    Diabetic review
    Nurse practitioner: What insulin are you on?
    Me: Novorapid
    N: What else?
    Me: Just novorapid - I'm on a pump so don't use long acting
    N: I don't know who told you that. Your morning levels must be very high.
    Me: No, the pump drips novorapid into me continuously and the rate varies to keep my sugars stable
    N: But I need to give you long acting insulin. Just wait for me to get a prescription signed
    Me: I don't need it.
    N: I think we need to get you some training as you clearly don't understand how to treat your diabetes. Wait there
    She then left to speak to a doctor who then came in. She didn't come back
     
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  18. dawnmc

    dawnmc Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    This is all so shocking.
     
  19. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Expert
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    Similar to the conversation that was had when I went in to hospital as a thirteen year old. On arrival, they took my bloods and the consultant said "How are you still conscious?"
     
  20. lizdeluz

    lizdeluz Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Just wondering how they can stop you writing stuff down? I'd like to see them try anyway. :D
     
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