1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2019 »
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Brand-spanking new

Discussion in 'Greetings and Introductions' started by Silverback-381, May 19, 2019.

  1. Silverback-381

    Silverback-381 · Member

    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    23
    Trophy Points:
    23
    This might be a rather rambling response so take what you will from it.

    I have always tried to eat properly but there were occasions when I might over-indulge. I tended to instinctively fast after such occasions.

    There is some research that indicates a connection between high stress levels and the onset of diabetes. In 2001 my wife presented with cancer with a prognosis of perhaps a year. I sold my company and devoted myself to her care. I also began changing her diet ( and mine) to pure foods. Nothing that was not fresh and certainly nothing with additives. The prognosis wass not realized but the treatment she underwent devastated her body and I became her ongoing caregiver. I would not have traded that time with her.

    Five years ago, she presented again and this round was metastatic. I knew this one was not going to have a good outcome. It was about that time that my weight began to slide from a robust 175 to 140 within a year. I knew there was something going on but it was not possible to be sick or take the time for treatment if it was a severe medical case. So I put it to the back of my mind and dealt with everything else that was going on.

    After my wife died, I must admit that tubs of ice cream and absolute junk food took me over for a few weeks; and that, combined with my ongoing joy of baking sweeties I am convinced sent my blood sugar rocketing. Finally, when I went to the doctor, diabetes was confirmed and all of the symptoms that I had experienced made sense. In fact, the diagnosis was strangely a relief because I think I had constructed a strong case for pancreatic cancer.

    Yesterday was a benchmark day for me. My blood was 8.3 at midday a dramatic decrease from 12.3. So one continues to be hopeful.

    Anyway, I hope this answers your question. This dissertation is not intended to elicit sympathy but rather candidly, to respond to your query

    All the best to you and your father, Cocosilk
     
    • Winner Winner x 2
    • Hug Hug x 1
    #21 Silverback-381, May 22, 2019 at 8:51 AM
    Last edited: May 22, 2019
  2. Cocosilk

    Cocosilk Gestational · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    563
    Likes Received:
    143
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Oh, it is a heartbreaking story though... Sorry to hear what you and your wife went through. I understand stress is a cause for many a health problem, and grief, I imagine, is one of the biggest stressors we experience. I have no such excuse for eating icecream before bedtime other than cravings.. which I am happy to say are not bothering me recently since eating a more low carb diet. Well, you are in the right place to get the best advice.
     
    • Friendly Friendly x 2
  3. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,454
    Likes Received:
    2,127
    Trophy Points:
    178
    I didn't have to deal with a lengthy sickbed. Doug was just gone one day, poof, no warning, end of it all, the world collapsing in on itself. I know what kind of stress I went though, 20 years ago, and how deep into depression I fell. So I can only imagine what it must have been like for you, spending years trying to help, and at a certain point, watching her go. I understand the tubs of icecream and I understand not taking care of yourself. You had other priorities.

    Bottom line, yeah, stress affects bloodsugars. Prolongued stress means your "fight or flight" response is on all the time, and with that, steroids are released, which in turn tell your liver to dump sugar, because you need to be able to act fast because there must be some sort of danger, and the boost of sugar/energy will surely help, right? No? Even with the sabretooth tiger long behind us, our cavemen-based bodies still react as if all stress comes down to running away from one on your heels, or fight it. How times have changed. All in all though, your body's been under a lot of strain. So yes, all this had an impact on your bloodsugars, developing insulin resistance, and coming to the point you're at now.

    I'm sorry about everything you went through, and I'm sorry about your wife, and all she suffered. I hope you'll be able to get your health on track and find some joy in life. It usually starts with little things, -did for me anyway- so who knows... Maybe bake some sweet stuff from recepies over on dietdoctor.com? They won't raise your bloodsugars, and still provide some enjoyment, I hope.

    Take a breath, then take care of yourself. Heal. You deserve it, after all this time.
    Hugs,
    Jo
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Hug Hug x 2
  4. Silverback-381

    Silverback-381 · Member

    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    23
    Trophy Points:
    23
    Jo, I am sorry about your loss. Even after 20 yrs I am sure there are times you still feel that loss.
    As hard as her journey, I would not change the time we had. I will heal but my joy is gone.
    I won't risk baking now because I know that dastardly sugar will grab me by the throat.
    Thank you
    Denis
     
    • Hug Hug x 2
  5. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,454
    Likes Received:
    2,127
    Trophy Points:
    178
    I remember the first time I laughed after Doug's passing. It was little over a year after, and it made the muscles in my face hurt. The sound startled me so much, was so unfamilliar, so alien, that I immediately stopped. It takes a while, but the raw edges become a little smoother with time. We can't skip through grief, we go through it head on and get out on the other side, eventually. Changed, scarred, but grateful for what we did get to have. And yes, even 20-odd years on, sometimes it punches me in the gut: I still think he was better at living than I ever was, a braver and a beter person, and he should still be here. But I make the best of it, and I think he'd approve. Life didn't turn out the way I envisioned, but considering the circumstances, I'm doing alright for myself. I hope the same will be true for you: life not quite being what you'd planned on, but getting better and doing okay. Maybe someday even downright good. I really hope that for you.

    For now, just take care of yourself, a day at a time. (And if you bake, make sure there's no sugar around, just erythritol instead. It costs an arm and a leg, but you can bake with it. And coconut- or almond flour....)
    Hugs,
    Jo
     
    • Hug Hug x 1
  6. Silverback-381

    Silverback-381 · Member

    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    23
    Trophy Points:
    23
    Doug sounds like a good man. I would like to point out that brave is quite relative Jo and in the short time we have conversed I am sure you are equal to his character.
    Hugs to you
     
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
  7. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,454
    Likes Received:
    2,127
    Trophy Points:
    178
    That... Is just about the kindest thing anyone could say to me. Thank you. (Yes, tearing up a little.)

    When we remember someone, it's good to see others remember the ones we loved with us, even if they never knew them. Just to acknowledge that they were important, and remain thus. Your love for your wife is a testiment to her character, and your own.

    The hurt gets a gradually beter over time, given enough of it. I can tell you though, the love doesn't fade. Not one bit. I hope there's comfort in that.
     
    • Hug Hug x 1
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook