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Burnout

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by claremiggle, Jan 14, 2018.

  1. claremiggle

    claremiggle Type 1 · Newbie

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    Hi everyone,

    I've had type one diabetes for six years now (diagnosed aged 26 in 2011) and I'm still struggling to get to grips with it. I've often described myself as a 'functioning diabetic' - getting by, but only just getting by - but over the last few months I've really been struggling with my control. I'm just getting a bit sick of it all, which I know is stupid because it's not like my diabetes is going anywhere! Does anyone have any tips/advice for dealing with this burnt out feeling and getting back on track?

    Any advice much appreciated!
     
    • Hug Hug x 7
  2. Red_river_

    Red_river_ Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I know how you feel, as for me , I was diabetic for only 3 months but the word has never left my mind. I live it, sleep it and of course eat it. When never I have time I search and read stuff about diabetes instead of other things I used to. I feel up and I feel down, of course more down than up and get very upset sometimes. Very recently I learned someone I know is loosing her husband, he has got pancreatic cancer stage 3, chemotherapy did not work. He has got just a few more months to live. Then I realised having diabetes is nothing compares to having cancer, or other more serious illnesses.... I am not sure if it is appropriate, but when I feel low, I think of others who having to deal with a lot more pain and stresses and worries everyday.., and say to me self I have no reason being missable, I still get up everyday, carry on with life as usual, just need to watch what I eat... That helps me, I hope it will help you too. Hugs.
     
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  3. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hi @claremiggle Yes it is pretty common among amongst Type 1’s to feel burnt out - the constant bg testing, insulin calculations, treating hypos etc etc, without dealing with life’s other stresses managing a health condition which requires constant monitoring is a lot to deal with. It’s obvious we know what to do and how it should be managed and why it should be managed but it’s fitting it in around everything else. My best advice is simply take each day at a time, try talking to your DSN about it and see if they can help in any way and also just talk to those around you and tell them your struggling with it. January is a long month so hopefully just get through this and the days will start to get longer and warmer again and you will find this feeling passes.
     
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  4. Chowie

    Chowie Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi,
    Yep I think most T1's go through it, I have been and yes it sneaks up on you. The first year you angry, denying it, etc. You get over that and number of years later for me at least, bang I was really over it, I didn't have an issue of being Diabetic, I was just over the grind. I suspect you are very diligent. I took a week off from being diligent and was a rebel, I cut down on those strip tests for a few weeks, I even skipped a number of meal bolus's. I found after a couple of weeks I was back on track again.

    Find a very very good friend have a big whinge then go out with them and have an awesome meal, remember your not diabetic for the evening, sweets have a double helping, please bolus for that.

    As Juicyj said, hang in there. If you are feeling really low a phycologist or physiatrist may help. Please I'm not inferring you are nuts, far from it, it's very normal, well as normal as the rest of us here. Don't go near a Libre or other CGM device whilst you are feeling this way as I find it kicks my butt into good behaviour and that is the last thing you need right now. No one can tell you how long it will last, but it will pass. The daily grind will become just a daily routine.

    I was told a number of medical professionals were turned into diabetics for a month 4 finger tests a day, 4 saline injections a day. None lasted 2 weeks and they expect us to do it for a lifetime, so whatever you do, don't beat yourself up.
     
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  5. claremiggle

    claremiggle Type 1 · Newbie

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    Thanks everyone for your advice - I really appreciate you all taking the time to reply. I know this is probably just a phase that I need to battle through, but it is helpful to know I'm not alone in feeling like this from time to time. I know I'm fortunate to have a condition that is ultimately manageable and doesn't interfere with life too much, but I guess I'm just a bit exhausted by it all right now. I wish there was some way we could all take a diabetes holiday every now and again...

    I'm feeling a bit more positive this evening though - forced myself out for a run earlier and that's perked me up a bit. @Juicyj I think you're right, the post-Christmas/January blues probably have something to do with this. Just need to troop on.
     
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  6. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hi @claremiggle Going for a run will help hugely:)

    Just remember these feelings do pass, I know at times it does feel overwhelming but if you know it will pass then it helps, I had a spell before Xmas where everything felt incredibly over whelming but I just focused on the day to day and kept up my t1 maintenance did some runs and things got better, the good thing is your talking to us about it so that helps let off some steam, hopefully each day it will get better :)
     
  7. rrenee

    rrenee LADA · Member

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    Hello there, I’m 76 years old and I just got laid four years ago which is Layton auto immune diabetes adult which turns out to be 1.5 but mostly like type one. It took me two years to except the fact but now I have a GMS with Dexcom five Monitor. To begin with this has saved me I would walk across hot coals for my GMS!!
    Now I am going to have Omnipod which is a pump that you can put on either arms ,legs, stomach , or hips. It has no Tubing Is just great, waterproof, easy to apply, and is changed every three days! So it sounds to me like you need these two devices and thank the stars ⭐️ in 2018 We have the ability to have this fabulous equipment to help us through our days and nights.

    I can’t imagine how people with type one or 1.5 diabetes was able to actually have a life and live in the 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s until pumps were discovered in the late 70s Talk to your physician get an Omni pod and a GMS and you will think you died and went to heaven have a beautiful day blessings and love

     
    #7 rrenee, Sep 6, 2018 at 6:14 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 6, 2018
  8. BrixtonType1

    BrixtonType1 Type 1 · Active Member

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    Hi Claremiggle sorry to read your feeling like that I’ve been diagnosed with type 1 for the last 3 month and to be honest the first month I was in complete panic did not what the hell was going on yes wishing this was not me then I decide this really is not going to break me I start back in the gym and now I find I need far less insulin I’m never in a panic about hypo I understand when I’m low so I address it and to be honest I’m living far more healthy now then I was planning to live before I was diagnosed and I’m 44
     
  9. ronialive

    ronialive Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    hi. I am 49 amd have been diabetic since I was 3. I was told that it is common for burn out and depression for people with diabetes in their 30. My clinic routinely refer people to psychology.
    I was sceptical but it really dd help to look at why I did or didn't do things and felt like that etc. If you are in UK and only see a gp ask to be referred to consultant and psychology. It will help.
    a pump is a lot of work so maybe now isn't the right time.
    we have to want to I'mprove.
    I self fund a libre and it has really helped.
    good luck and keep talking
     
  10. gb350

    gb350 Type 1 · Member

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    Hi Rrenee.
    If I’m still getting laid when I’m 72 I’ll be more than happy. 4 years is a fair gap between though.
    Hi Claremiggle.
    I’ve struggled day in day out with type 1 for nearly 40 years now.
    Routine makes my life somewhat easier but even then for no apparent reason it can still go off script and lay you low.
    New tech is improving things slightly with phone apps for blood test results and things like libre monitoring.
    I just try to do the best I can even if I still wake up every day wishing I didn’t have the stupid bloody condition. You can only play with the cards you are dealt.
    Good luck for the future.
     
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  11. KBev

    KBev Type 1 · Member

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    Firstly, big hugs!
    I am 26 years a T1, and still frequently suffer burnout. As @ronialive does, I also self fund a libre CGM which I find helps with the daily monotony, and it can be fun to compete with yourself and watch improvements happening. But that doesn't solve it for me. I just have to forgive myself from time to time. I have to accept that some days I just don't want to play anymore. I sometimes spend the day under the covers, not eating or doing any bolus insulin. I never miss my basal now, although as a teenager... jeez!

    I don't think there are many diabetics who run perfect scores every day, forever, without suffering from some burnout. So don't try to be perfect all the time, just do your best. Try new recipes, see what they do to your bloods. Try a new sport. See if you can start up an informal local group of people to meet with you to vent. I sometimes do this in the pub over a pint! *Not the doctors orders!*

    I would also recommend getting a referral into psychology at some point - like @Chowie mentions. I have had a couple of rounds of CBT which helped with health anxiety and helped me not feel so bloody guilty all the time. It's not easy, what we have to do every single day, so please don't beat yourself up. Well done for asking for help! And recognise the good days. :)
     
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  12. Chris Bowsher

    Chris Bowsher Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    It's a heavy cross to bear. The trick is finding the most efficient way to carry it up the hill.

    This condition has undeniably left it's mark on me that's for sure.
     
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