1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2021 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

CGM / Libre funding- who has it?

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by donnellysdogs, Jul 23, 2016.

  1. phoenix

    phoenix Type 1 · Expert

    Messages:
    5,672
    Likes Received:
    3,675
    Trophy Points:
    178
    As some members know, I live in France. This week I got home from 3 months in the UK ( we are preparing to move back and now have an apartment there) to find my diabetologist had phoned and asked me to collect a new prescription.
    Its for a Libre and 2 capteurs. She knows I have one but found it too expensive to use all the time.
    I haven't seen her yet but have found about it on the internet, since last month they can be prescribed and paid for by the health care authority at 100%
    https://www.federationdesdiabetique...ibre-sera-rembourse-a-partir-du-1er-juin-2017

    They are available for T1 or T2, for adults or children aged more than 4 months who use 3+ injections a day or a pump and test 3+ times a day.
    They reimburse the cost of a reader and 26 capteurs a year.The manufacturer (Abbott) guarantees replacement for faulty readers or capteurs within three days.
    The first prescription must be by a specialist (diabetologist or paediatrician specialising in diabetes) The Regional health authority has to provide education in it's use
    There is a trial of 1-3months to make sure the person can use it and doesn't have reactions to it.
    The device replaces prescriptions for testing strips but 100 a year will still be allowed.
    .

    So will put in my prescription and see how things go (but I'm already worried about keeping my pump when we eventually return to the UK, let alone a libre!)
     
    #61 phoenix, Jul 6, 2017 at 8:56 PM
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2017
  2. catapillar

    catapillar Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,390
    Likes Received:
    2,892
    Trophy Points:
    198
    It's not your GP that makes the request to the CCG. It's your diabetic consultant. Although the diabetic team says CCG funding is unlikely has a request for funding actually been made? It's only when a request is made that you actually get your answer from the CCG, and an opportunity to push back if it's not granted. If your consultant is reluctant to make a funding request it's worth contacting input diabetes as they are willing to assist with making funding requests - http://www.inputdiabetes.org.uk

    I went to a talk by the charity that provides medical detection dogs a couple of months ago, I think they said it could be 3 + years from getting on their list to actually getting a dog - https://www.medicaldetectiondogs.org.uk
     
  3. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

    Messages:
    13,231
    Likes Received:
    12,475
    Trophy Points:
    298
    The criteria for each ccg is normally listed as the "position statement". Yes, every CCG that limits CGM will have set up their own "position statement" - but generally the same.

    The consultants are actually limited in how many people they can put forward for exceptional/individual funding.

    I think undee NICE guidelines it stares GPs can put in for it but I havent heard of a GP doing this for sensors. Most GPs dont even know what sensors are!

    I've seen a copy of the reports that have to be completed by medics on our behalf by my CCG. They really do have to state the ins and outs of a ducks ****. Goodness knows how long it takes to complete these forms. I'm sure my medics do not have enough knowledge of my day to day struggles.
     
  4. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

    Messages:
    13,231
    Likes Received:
    12,475
    Trophy Points:
    298
    I think you would be wise to ask and find out for yourself whether your CCG have a position statement for the funding of CGM's.

    As said, some CCGs publish on internet and can be googled. Some you have to either go online to hospital and there is a link to their freedom of information officer on all hospital websites... so you can get this or phone them up.

    I suspect a hypo alert dog being "funded" by you effectively could be an easier option for them.

    I am just up for continuation funding and keep getting told it will be refused. However, I think a lot depends upon the way consuktants and diabetes educators write the information out and how much they really understand peoples struggles.
     
  5. TheBigNewt

    TheBigNewt Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,167
    Likes Received:
    374
    Trophy Points:
    123
    Training a diabetic assistance dog costs at least 1,000 times CGM for a year or 2. And they don't pay what you pay for the sensors either. Whoever is making the decisions over there it would take 3 of to make a halfwit. When it comes to NHS Newt is not impressed!
     
    #65 TheBigNewt, Jul 6, 2017 at 11:34 PM
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2017
  6. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,366
    Likes Received:
    1,219
    Trophy Points:
    158
    I expect the NHS does not pay any of the costs of diabetic assistance dogs.......
     
  7. Trish_D

    Trish_D · Newbie

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    My son has T1 and is on the autistic spectrum. We currently pay for his libre testing as even with the clinical psychologist saying that he needs to have the meter to help him with monitoring and coping with his diabetes, our NHS Trust will not fund it. The difference in his ability to manage his highs and lows (he doesn't notice these himself, we do as his autistic traits become more pronounced) is amazing. Also by having his diabetes more under control means he is more able to cope with his autism and life in general.
    Also currently fighting to get a pump as he is all over the place complete with hypos during the night, then being very high in the morning.. But that has taken 6months of discussion already and they are still not convinced it will benefit him.
     
    #67 Trish_D, Jul 7, 2017 at 4:39 PM
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2017
  8. Al_P

    Al_P Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Hi
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook