1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2018 »
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Confused

Discussion in 'Low-carb Diet Forum' started by Ruby2shoes, Apr 21, 2018.

  1. Ruby2shoes

    Ruby2shoes Family member · Active Member

    Messages:
    31
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    28
    hi husband recently diagnosed with type 2 and needs to lose a lot of weight so I'm here trying to find ways to help. All indicators point to a low carb high fat diet. However I've recently acquired a book called quick cooking diabetes by Louise Blair and Norma mcgough which has been produced in association with diabetes uk. However the advice in this book seems to contradict what I've been reading in that in the nutrition and diabetes section it states it says to have low fat spread and things like crime fraiche instead of double cream yet in the low carb stuff I've been reading it says you should have butter and full fat cream etc. It also says that meals should be based around bread, cereals and potatoes as starchy foods form the largest portion of your diet. Where as this all seems to be a big no no on low carb. So I don't know what advice I should be following! I feel there's so much conflicting advice.
     
  2. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Master

    Messages:
    10,318
    Likes Received:
    8,193
    Trophy Points:
    298
    "The other place," as we here know it, follows the NHS advice and the "Eatwell Guide" which does indeed recommend the "base all meals around starchy carbs ". Most of us here have had far better results by ignoring this and going low carb. Current science for the most part supports the low carb way of doing it. Read some of the success stories threads here and you'll see. Give it a go for a couple of months and watch the pounds drop off and the blood sugars lower.
     
    • Agree Agree x 4
  3. Mike D

    Mike D Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    6,910
    Likes Received:
    10,838
    Trophy Points:
    198
    @Ruby2shoes ... IMO, that's a very poor way of tackling the condition. Just the foods you do not need
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. BigIain

    BigIain Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    88
    Likes Received:
    97
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Hi, I know the feeling it is sooo confusing.

    My personal experience being diagnosed T2 on 29th Jan this year.
    My HbA1c was 89 so I went lo carb following the recipes from
    The 8-Week Blood Sugar Diet Recipe Book by Clare Bailey.

    In 11 weeks I've lost 2st 10lbs and my HbA1c is down to 46.

    I've not had a beer, a slice of bread, any pasta or a grain of rice and the only chocolate I've had is over 85%.

    Plenty of Gin and slimline tonic though!

    It has worked for me. We are different.

    What ever your hubby does, do it with him and enjoy finding new food!

    Iain
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    7,893
    Likes Received:
    5,396
    Trophy Points:
    178
    There is indeed a lot of conflicting advice out there. The thing about the low fat high carb diet advice is that it has been touted for fifty years but rates of obesity and Type 2 Diabetes are now considered to be at epidemic levels.
    The foods such as cereals, bread, potatoes, pasta etc are all high in carbohydrates as you know. Of the three macronutrients carbs elicit the highest insulin response because they are very easily and speedily turned to glucose which is evidenced by our bg monitors. Fats on the other hand stay pretty flat line in terms of insulin response and protein (generally) have a gentler rise and fall in terms of bg.

    Many thousands of people over the decades have tried low fat diets beleiving somehow that fats make you fat. This was never true. The high carbs in the modern western diet provoke high insulin responses, one of insulin's jobs is to store excess glucose as fat. It is sometimes called 'The fat storage driver'.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Winner Winner x 1
  6. IanD

    IanD Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,415
    Likes Received:
    1,018
    Trophy Points:
    178
    The other place endorses the "Eatwell guide" basing a supposed healthy diet on complex carbs & low fat. That advice is, according to the technical people there is based on "the best scientific evidence." They accept that a low carb diet works for some people in the short term, but maintain there is no long term evidence for its safety & effectiveness. I've referred to their cited scientific evidence & found that they actually ignore the conclusions & misquote minor points to justify their stance. I had several months correspondence with them, & have NO confidence in their "science."

    However, they maintain that however well we follow their diet, diabetes is progressive, complications will develop, & ever increasing medication will be needed.

    That is one point I proved true, following their diet for 8 years. Diabetic neuropathy become crippling. I then found this forum, & gave up all the obvious carbs. In three months I was out of pain & back on the tennis courts. That was ten years ago. I still follow the LCHF diet & still play tennis at club standard at 79, with NO diabetes complications. I haven't really tried to lose weight, though at a BMI of 25 I'm over a stone (7 Kg) lighter than my maximum.

    You have a choice follow the claimed "best scientific advice" basing you diet on carbs & see your health deteriorate, or follow the LCHF diet that works, testified by 100,000 diabetics.
     
    • Like Like x 3
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook