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Considering Insulin Pump

Discussion in 'Insulin Pump Forum' started by KimmyT, Apr 14, 2022.

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  1. KimmyT

    KimmyT · Newbie

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    I'm just wondering if anyone can help me please.

    I've been asked by my consultants for years to think about going on a pump but it's never really appealed. However, I'm getting married soon and would like to start a family and need better control. A pump seems to be the best way to go!

    I have some questions for pump users.
    Do the lines get in the way of daily life?
    Does the cannula etc have to get changed every day when you shower?
    Does it get tangled during sleep?
    Where do users put their pump daily? (e.g. a belt or holder)
    How did you decide which one to go for?
    Any rugby/contact sports players on a pump how do you find ease of use is during training and games?

    Im currently a Freestyle Libre user on Levemir and Fiasp injections. HBA1C is 64.

    I'm anxious about the potential change and would just like someone with experience to put me at ease please :)
     
  2. Rokaab

    Rokaab Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I've only got it caught on drawer handles in the kitchen a couple of times in just under 2 years, otherwise its been fine

    You just disconnect the tubing when you have a shower/bath, the infusion sets I use (Medtronic) do come with plugs for the end so water/soap/anything else cant get in, in other words the cannula stays on me, but the tubing and pump are still in my bedroom - my pump is actually waterproof, but I'd have nowhere to clip/hang it if it was still connected whilst showering :)

    I haven't found that issue, though I live on my own, so noone else could get tangled or can accidentally pull on stuff

    Depends how I'm feeling and what I'm doing, I have a pump pouch that I use a lot of the time as it has its own belt with it, but my pump also has a (removable) belt clip on the back so I can just clip it to the belt on my trousers, so depends what I'm doing, if I'm lounging around just wearing tracky bottoms the pump pouch works better for me as I have no belt, when I'm doing archery I use the pump pouch as my quiver also goes around my middle so a belt clip may get knocked off

    I got no choice - it was the one the hospital offered or nothing - I had done research beforehand but all that was for naught in the end lol.
    You probably want to see what your hospital actually offers before researching any :) - some seem to have a lot of choice, some don't
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
    #2 Rokaab, Apr 14, 2022 at 1:09 PM
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2022
  3. In Response

    In Response Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @KimmyT

    I really like my pump but agree it is useful to do some research first.
    I have had two pumps - a tubey one which is no longer available and a Medtrum patch pump.

    Regarding your questions
    Do the lines get in the way of daily life?
    When I had a tubey pump, I was able to tuck the tube away and never had an issue of catching it on a door handle which I was afraid. of beforehand.
    You have to think about the tube when you get dressed but after that, it is no bother.

    Does the cannula etc have to get changed every day when you shower?
    You can unclip a tubey pump when you have a shower. The cannula remains (you can add a cap if you want) so you just clip the tube back in when you get out of the shower.
    A patch pump, remains attached all the time.
    Cannulas are changed every 3 days.

    Does it get tangled during sleep?
    When I got my first pump, I was told I could let it roam free in bed. Whilst teh tube never got tangled, the pump would always migrate to just under my hip bone and I would wake up when I shifted.
    I invested in a HidIn Pump belt which I wrapped around my upper leg during teh night and kept my pump under control.
    (The pump belt was also good during the day)

    Where do users put their pump daily? (e.g. a belt or holder)
    With a tubey pump, I either clipped it to my waistband, used a pump belt or made a small hole in my trouser pocket to feed the tube through and kept the pump in my pocket. The latter approach worked for baggy trousers but not great for something more tailored.
    Some women, keep their pump in their bra or suspend it from the lower bra strap.

    How did you decide which one to go for?
    With my first pump, I had no choice.
    When it came up for renewal, I was told, again I had no choice. However, as I am petite, I always found it difficult to hide my pump. It was either completely on display or I had a weird square bulge. This was affecting my mental health as I felt I was always "announcing my diabetes" so made an impassioned plea for a smaller pump. Initially, I was told "tough" but, luckily, Medtrum approached my clinic to do a trial of their pump and I was selected as the guinea pig and have been using it since.

    If I was to choose today, the first step is to find out what your clinic offers. I was incredibly lucky to get a pump which was officially not on offer and suspect I was "allowed" to go off piste because it was not my first pump. There is little point investigating a pump which your clinic does not offer. You are very likely to be disappointed.
    After that I think the thinsg to consider are
    - size of cartridge. Most are 200 units. If you use more than about 60 units of insulin per day (basal and bolus), you will haveto change your sets every other day unless you have a bigger pump
    - does the size of pump matter to you? As I emntioned, being small, meant it was difficult to hide the pump.
    - how do you want to control your pump and give yourself a bolus dose? Many pumps have the controls on teh pump. So you will need to get it out to give yourself a bolus. This is not ideal if your pump is stuffed down your bra. Some pumps have a separate PDM (I think of it like a remote control). This is great because your pump can stay in place but it is soemthing else for me to lose. Finally, some pumps can be controlled via a phone app. This is great if you have a compatible phone which you always have charged.
    - do you want the option for closed looping. YOu may not get a CGM with your pump but you may be able to fund one yourself.

    Any rugby/contact sports players on a pump how do you find ease of use is during training and games?
    I do not do contact sports but am pretty active. In fact, sport was the main justification for a pump. My levels plummet when I exercise With a pump, I am able to suspend my basal and stop the hypos. With a tubed pump, you can disconnect the pump, enjoy a game/half of rugby, avoid the hypos (without the need for carb stuffing up front) and then plug back in when you have finished/
    I did read of someone who does karate with a pump. She wrapped her pump in bubble wrap before a "fight" (?)
     
  4. derivadow

    derivadow Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I went with the Medtrum Nano because of the size, the option to control it from my phone (less stuff + some redundancy) and because its a patch pump. I also wasn't interested in/ didn't need some of the features other pumps offer over the Nano.

    Not anymore and when I did I wasn't a diabetic but I suspect I would be switching back to MDI for a game (esp because I played at 6)

    FWIW I was very uncertain about going onto a pump but very glad I did.
     
  5. NicoleC1971

    NicoleC1971 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Good luck! Best case you get your hba1c down and have less hypos. Worst is that nothing really changes and you request to go back onto MDI again. It isn't a silver bullet. Good luck.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  6. Chas C

    Chas C Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Exactly the same questions / concerns stopped me from moving to a pump for nearly 10 yrs, in hindsight it was a wasted 10 yrs for me.

    Do the lines get in the way of daily life? No hardly ever, only twice in 10 yrs have I pulled out the cannula accidentally, so make sure you have spares.

    Does the cannula etc have to get changed every day when you shower? As mentioned above, no, just take pump off, unless its waterproof.

    Does it get tangled during sleep? Nope mine stay's free in bed with me

    Where do users put their pump daily? (e.g. a belt or holder) Shirt pocket, sometimes belt clip, sometimes hanging in holder around my neck (so over chest).

    How did you decide which one to go for? I had a choice of 4 so wrote a list of my needs and checked each one against list.

    Any rugby/contact sports players on a pump how do you find ease of use is during training and games?
    I'm not contact sport but snorkel, white water kayak, if needed I take pump off when snorkelling for an hour or so. I'm guessing you could take it off for contact sport for each half and top up if needed at half/full time. A CGM is very useful but you do need a phone today to see results (even on a watch), although the new Dexcom due this year should work with an iWatch without a phone.

    Go for it you will be shocked how good they are now, especially the looping ones.

     
  7. 8amoreno

    8amoreno Type 1 · Member

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    I've used Medtronic 630g in the past but just recently switched to Dexcom G6 and Tandem X2 Slim. Absolutely love it better than Medtronic. Slimmer and with the control IQ it predicts highs and lows and auto adjusts insulin Basel according to Dexcom G6 CGM.
     
  8. 8amoreno

    8amoreno Type 1 · Member

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    Download the tconnect simulator app to see it. USER_SCOPED_TEMP_DATA_MSGR_PHOTO_FOR_UPLOAD_1650492252150_6922666255165365425.jpg
     
  9. KimmyT

    KimmyT · Newbie

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    Wow thanks so much for all your responses! Certainly eased my worries a lot.

    It's a closed loop system they are offering me. Dumfries and Galloway diabetes team always seem to be great at offering new/newer technologies.

    I think I'll go for it! With an improved, more positive attitude. Thanks everyone :)
     
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