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Cost of Diabetic Consumables

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by tronied, Feb 1, 2010.

  1. Dippy3103

    Dippy3103 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm a type 2, controlled by diet only, my local PCT do not prescribe test strips for the likes of me.

    I want to have tight control- as i was only just in diabetic range on diagnosis srely i must be able to get my numbers down to near normal levels. How can i do this if i can't test?

    Both my partner and i work and pay in (plus childcare costs to do so) but i appear to not be getting back. I could of course ignore my diabetes, let it get worse and cost the NHS so much more.

    I won't buy from e-bay, because i refuse to risk putting money in the pocket of someone who is illegally selling the test strips that WE are paying for and then can't get! There is only so much money in the pot and taking more than they need for their own use is depriving others. Not to mention illegal. I'd rather pay more (which i can ill afford to) than supplement their income.

    I think i am going to take a leaf out of Handr's book and look into getting an Abbott moniter (my one is one touch) if i can legitimatley get the strips cheaper.
     
  2. tronied

    tronied · Newbie

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    If I remember right, one of the first testing kits I had was unrine based. The tube of test strips contained about 100 strips. It's the one where you compare the colour with the value chart to get the result. I had a look on Amazon, and most are in the £14-18 range, but there was one selling 100 for £4.50. It was a third party seller where the actual contact number relates to the following address after doing some digging:

    Mediply Diagnostics. Blackpool, FY4 3RL. Tel: (Omitted).

    So whether it is a nurse taking some on the side, or an actual company they seem a lot better than some person selling his prescriptions. Also, this map...

    http://www.bing.com/maps/?v=2&cp=sywzdwgrf883&scene=7592721&lvl=2&sty=b&eo=0&where1=FY4%203RL

    ...seems to show its location as a warehouse, so with that and the telephone number its making the seller more plausible.

    Anyway, as for the tests, its probably not going to be as accurate and as fast as the proper strips, but for better control it has to be worth a shot?
     
  3. Bluenosesol

    Bluenosesol Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Fog,
    do me a favour, take a walk into your local Farm Foods, which is a national chain and take a look at the info on their pack of frozen sliced rhubarb and compare it against the stats which you have produced. You may then begin to understand me....
     
  4. suffolkboi61

    suffolkboi61 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    How will anyone know this is they have not tested plus when I was diagnosed T2 I was told to eat a lot of foods that I now know to be unfavourable to my Bs.
     
  5. Lucozade

    Lucozade · Active Member

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    To suggest that testing is only a "comfort blanket" and is not necessary is nothing short of utterly ludicrous.

    There is proven scientific evidence that failure to manage bg causes damage and can lead to long term complications, even in prediabetes. Taking the necessary actions to mitigate this potential damage is a whole lot cheaper for the NHS, than letting diabetics' conditions simply run riot, then paying the cost of dealing with complications later. Like with so many conditions, the NHS tries to save money by petty penny-pinching, but pays through the nose, ten fold, further down the line, rather than taking a proactive financial strategy. This is simply poor accounting, but the very suggestion that diabetic patients are "selfish" for wanting strips, simply to pro-actively manage what can be a very damaging and debilitating condition, is, at best, insulting and at worst, complete madness.

    The NHS pays for all sorts of things that we could sit and question, but that is not the point. The point is that the NHS should be free and we've all paid into it at some time or another. What price are we now putting on human lives, quality of life and future health, if we are to question patients having the means by which to manage their conditions?

    The simple fact is that world class healthcare costs money and cannot be achieved by accountancy being the driving factor. Unfortunately, the UK is in severe political and legal disarray and the system is overcrowded by too many people "taking" and not putting in - and not for health reasons, but for endemic problems, such as overcrowding and unfettered immigration. The UK is the most overcrowded country in Europe (and beyond).

    If a diabetic does not use the testing methodology to understand what is happening to their blood sugar and use that data to take appropriate interventions, they are simply storing up trouble for the future. I would ask those who imply in this thread that testing is a "comfort blanket" to consider what their stance is, later down the line, when the rest of us have to pay for them to have kidney, eye or nerve problems sorted, for example, or for them to have a limb amputated. Sorry, but that is the stark reality of what can happen when this condition is not monitored and managed and preventative and pro-active steps to avoid that can only be taking by monitoring and acting accordingly.

    It is far more selfish to not manage the condition correctly and expect the rest of us to pay for your associated complications in years to come, when it could have been avoided by, in relative terms, inexpensive testing and condition management protocols. I should note that testing and management cannot always offset the possibility of complications, however there is certainly substantive evidence that the risk of such, is considerably reduced, in the face of disciplined management. It costs several hundred pounds simply for a patient to occupy a hospital bed for the night, before treatment, surgery and resources are factored in, not to mention that a bed has been taken up and a patient that may be in greater need, deprived, (whom may well have had NO means of control over their situation).

    Anyone that elects to come here and refer to others as selfish, for simply wanting to pro-actively manage their condition, is seriously lacking in understanding of the financial principles of return on investment (ROI) and the financial implications of inaction. Put quite simply, a stitch in time, saves nine. It is every human being's right and indeed *responsibility* in the UK, to use available means by which to improve their health, reduce their risks of future severe health problems and improve their quality of life. Those who don't do this (and indeed whom criticise others for doing so), are in fact the selfish and irresponsible ones, rather than those who do, or whom wish to do, but are denied the means.

    Don't come here and take issue with everyone whom wants a "comfort blanket" and whom makes the effort of taking pro-active steps in self-management, then later on, expect us to pay for your the consequences of your inaction, because you were simply too lazy, selfish and irresponsible to expedite proper management of your own condition.
     
  6. Bluenosesol

    Bluenosesol Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Lucozade,

    absolutely agree, though as I suspected this Foggit the whatever hasnt signed in since 12th Feb so was obviously on some kind of mission. Good Riddance to her.....

    I have my 12 month review in May and if I dont get an agreement to prescribe test strips, I will escalate to our local PALS group.

    Good Testing....Steve.
     
  7. hanadr

    hanadr · Expert

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    Noblehead wrote


    >>it was far cheaper to provide a patient with the best suitable medicines available, that to deal with the aftermath of a uncontrolled condition. I think that he may have had a point there! :( <<
    I tried this arguement on my PCT and it got me precisely nowhere.
    so now I've sent them the details on the latest study published by the NHS itself saying that those patients who want to test and know how to use their results SHOULD have strips prescribed. Let's hope Iget the prescription this time. I only want 1 box per month, unless I'm ill. Which doesn't happen oten.
    At present, I buy direct from the supplier at £14.?? including P&P
    Hana
     
  8. Debloubed

    Debloubed Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    It's not just type 2's who have problems getting prescriptions sorted! it took me 4 weeks to get my new strips (vital for my new pump, old strips are not compatible) and my GP would not add them without lots of fuss. After all the fuss, I turned up to collect the presciption and he had added x1 box!! 50 strips in a box, with pump in early days that will last me approx 5 days. after lots of kerfuffle at the surgery, he increased it to x2 boxes and I settled as I was exhausted by then! went to collect from the pharmacy last Friday (after requesting repeat on their online system) and the pharmacy hasn't received it. I went over to the surgery and asked what in God's name was going on and was told (and I quote) the Doc had written on my notes 'patient has used a lot of strips lately, presciption not given, please keep an eye on this one' !!!!!!!!! I was gobsmacked!! Poor reception chick took the brunt of my wrath, GP was in the surgery but with a patient so I couldn't see him. Spoke with a lovely nurse who went to see him (funny, he would see her but not me when he was with his 'patient?!' and he not only signed the presciption but upped it to x4 boxes ;-) the poor reception lady said 'I'm sorry love, it's the PCT, they don't like paying' to which I replied 'they are paying for my pump, they have approved this funding!!' bottom line, I am not costing anyone any more than I was before I was on my pump with regards to insulin and strip supplies. If anything, I am using a lot less insulin now! the Docs don't like me having access to so many meds and supplies by keeping my old strips and old insulin on my prescription.

    Rant over!! :lol: I'll join anyone, type 1 and 2 in a campaign for better access for supplies, if we need them, we need them, it's shouldn't be open for discussion.
     
  9. Bluenosesol

    Bluenosesol Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  10. catherinecherub

    catherinecherub · Guest

    This is what my PCT says on the subject of test strips for Type 2's,

    "Self monitoring should be offered to a newly diagnosed T2 only as an integral part of his/her self management education. It's purpose should be discussed and there should be agreement how the results should be interpreted and acted upon.
    This is supported by one of the options in the PCT prescribing incentive scheme to reduce the cost of blood glucose testing strips. Many patients are still testing unnecessarily and with no plan in place to act on the results. Assessment of self testing skills and continued benefit should form part of the annual review. Clearly there are some patients for whom self monitoring is appropriate and forms part of their self management plan.
    Patient education and self management are key priorities for implementation. Self monitoring should only be offered as part of the self management education".

    IMHO that means that if you are proactive then you will get them and 7years on I am still able to. I do not use many now but did use a lot in the beginning and my G.P. did not object to prescribing them.
    I do know local people who test at the most inapproriate times and have no idea why their levels are off the scale or very low so I conclude that it is the education that is lacking local to me.
     
  11. Bluenosesol

    Bluenosesol Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Catherine,

    Many GP practices including mine have an across the board simple rule :-
    NO INSULIN - NO STRIPS!!

    I have pleaded with my GP/DN and lodged a complaint with the NHS. I will plead my case again at my 12 month review in May.

    I have got my HBA1C down from 10.3 to 5.1 by acting on my results....

    ....could you be a little more specific about how my lack of proactivity has resulted in me having to pay for my own test strips.

    Steve.
     
  12. jopar

    jopar · Well-Known Member

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    I think in the main that it shouldn't be the case of not being allowed to test as a T2, but how much and how often does a T2 need to test?

    The main advantage for frequent testing for T2's is in the early days after their first dignoises when they are working towards improving their control, and making necessary lifestyle changes, seeing the impact of what several lunch time sandwiches can do to your blood glucose, or that pork pie means makes it easier if you have to reduce or change what you would normally eat...

    But after a couple of months, one can normally gauge those who are being pro-active with there managment, and those who really aren't... It's at this stage where the HCP should be looking and discussing whether providing test strips is a pointless exercise..

    Once good control is established, then there shouldn't be any need for a T2 unless of cause they are taking medication that could cause a hypo, to test on a daily bases but they should be swapping to a testing regime, that covers a fasting, bed-time, and several before and after meal readings per week so that they have guidence of what is happening, they should also have strips available to test when they are ill, or changes happen in their normal day to day routines, or if they intend to try out a new food etc..

    I don't begrudge provison of tests strips to anyone, but IMHO for a well controlled T2 to expect the abilty and supplies to test as frequently as a type 1 has to on a daily bases for ever more, is providing an unnecessary safety blanket and wasting vaulable resources..
     
  13. catherinecherub

    catherinecherub · Guest

    Hi Steve,
    I am not suggesting for one minute that you are not pro-active. People on this forum are all proactive. I am saying that diabetics in my area who are not pro-active will find them difficult to get. This is not a generalisation but relevant to my area only.
    I was only demonstrating that different PCT's have different rules.

    There are only 69 PCT's out of 152 that do Desmond and Dafne courses even though NICE told them in 2003 to implement this. It is the PCT's that are the problem. I would like to know what their excuses are. Some rely on practice nurses to take on the diabetic educator role with only basic training so that money can be saved. There is a shortage of all specialist nurses throughout the U.K. and who can blame anyone who decides against nursing as a career. Their pay scales are not comparable with most other professions.
    If you took offence then I apologise, it was not my intention.

    Catherine.
     
  14. cocacola

    cocacola Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    good luck Hana, is there a link on Abbott website for ordering strips? Or is it a phone call to CS?
     
  15. Bluenosesol

    Bluenosesol Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Catherine,

    Last year, after 23 years of service, I was laid off without a penny even though my company owed me over £100,000. Over my lifetime, my employers (on my behalf) and I, have paid in over a quarter of a million pounds in tax and NI funds. I received £63 a week Job Seekers for 6 months and then told to live on any savings I may have accrued. So as you may imagine I am very disappointed when so called fellow diabetics appear to begrudge me the right to maximise my longevity with a relatively miniscule sum from public funds.

    Your apology is appreciated but no need, as for Jopar's blanket and the totally irrelevant comparison T1 to T2 remark, well maybe its time to move on.....

    Steve.
     
  16. jopar

    jopar · Well-Known Member

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    Steve
    It actually pays to read posts fully before making comments...

    I hadn’t said T2’s shouldn’t be given test strips, but an individual review to match their needs at any one time...

    But to be blatantly honest, what would you or the likes of hanna actually gain, if you were provided enough test strips to test 6-12 times a day, apart from that your current regime is still working, a comfort blanket.. What would a newbie T2 gain the ability to change their lifestyles to bring their blood glucose under control, and work out what aspects of their lifestyle has what type of effect on their ability to maintain control.. When would a well controlled T2 diabetic require increase to frequency of testing, at points when they suffer illness, undergo a lifestyle change or if when present regime testing indicates that something afoot…

    Being a T1 and using an insulin pump, means that I can go into DKA within hours, if something goes afoot with my pump, I have to know what my blood glucose is, so that I can calculate my dose needed when I eat any food, even exercise can mean a check so that if needs be I can adjust my pump to avoid a hypo... I test frequently to survive from day to day, not to aim for avoiding complications in the future, this is a benefit I get if I achieve my day to day control of survival, I would dearly love to put my BG monitor away for a day and have the luxury of eat even a snack without having to check BG and calculating a dose etc.. Can’t imagine what it’s like to eat a meal without worrying whether a hypo/hyper would happen followed by an A&E visit..

    But even I have to stamp my feet, and moan to get adequate test strips supplied, if my surgery had their way, I would be reluctantly restricted to 100 strips a month, which when you have to test 6-12 times a day, falls far short indeed...

    You need to remember those that visit this forum, are pro-active diabetics, and its wrong that they are denied access to suitable quantities of test strips, but you also need to remember that many diabetic aren’t, there will be many T2’s who will test frequently, and if given the strips would even tests 6-12 times a day, then take their readings to their clinic every 3 or 6 months, but would have done nothing to improve or change their results... Which as one can only say, a pointless waste of money?
     
  17. Sid Bonkers

    Sid Bonkers Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I think that is a very sensible stance Jopar, when I was on insulin I tested a minimum of 4 times a day and often more often than that especially whilst learning what foods did what to my numbers, since stopping insulin 5 weeks ago I now only test an average of twice a day and that is reducing as I see a continuation of stabilised results. Obviously if I were to become ill I might increase the amount of testing as necessary but if things carry on the way they are then soon I will be happy to only test a few times each week.

    I don't believe any PCT should have an automatic blanket policy of so many strips a month/year for T2's but enough to "match their needs at any one time" but patients should understand why they are testing and how to use the test results, not just to see how high/low they are, but as a means to reduce their bg levels by adjusting their meals.
     
  18. Bluenosesol

    Bluenosesol Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Quote It actually pays to read posts fully before making comments...

    Thank You Jopar - your insult is typical of the crasseness and lack of mutual respect, that has permeated this forum of late .....

    "David get your coat we are going down the bl**dy feathers!!!"
     
  19. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
    Retired Moderator

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    Steve,

    I don't agree with the above statement. As the subject is posted in the discussions part of the forum, it is expected that there will be quite a diverse range of opinions on subject matters to do with diabetes, more so when treatment and funding is the issue being debated. As ever, no one is completely right or wrong, but all replies are worthy and should be considered, after all we are offering advice and opinions based on their own experiences and knowledge, it is up to the reader to make up their own minds.

    Sometimes things can become heated, that's the nature of discussion forums, not just diabetes ones. Since joining the forum, had I took exception to what someone had wrote in reply to my posting, I would have been long gone, but I am old enough and mature enough not to react in this manner, and accept that people opinions are as worthy as mine. Time to take five minutes and reflect on matters, I don't think anyone has made a insulting remark so far. Both you and Jopar make some very worthwhile contributions to the forum, it is in everyone interests that we try to get on, after all we are fighting the same fight.

    Nigel
     
  20. Debloubed

    Debloubed Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    hear hear Nigel!!

    Deb :D
     
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