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Covid Vaccine Priority

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by SamA, Nov 11, 2020.

  1. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I am willing to have a properly tested vaccine. Note the word "properly" I trust the government's use of that word as far as I can throw them.

    I find it interesting how this haste is now already turning into the bashing of those exercising proper and prudent caution about an untried type of human vaccine which involves changing DNA.

    Remember thalidomide? And it's follow up med which also caused birth deformation? Let's tread carefully and not rush into anything.
     
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  2. zand

    zand Type 2 · Expert

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    That's probably why the elderly in care homes are getting the vaccine first, if it doesn't kill them then it's 'safe' for the rest of us.
     
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  3. Seacrow

    Seacrow LADA · Well-Known Member

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    If you are offered a vaccine and refuse, that is certainly your right.

    If you then get covid and become severely ill, do you have the right to demand that the nhs nurses, doctors and staff put their lives at risk to treat an illness that you chose to risk?

    Do you have the right to increase the risk of severe illness to those vulnerable who cannot be vaccinated? If it comes down to requiring either the unvaccinated to voluntarily self isolate, or the vulnerable to shield, will you isolate, knowing you had a choice whether to vaccinate, but the vulnerable have no choice. (Really don't think this'll happen, but hypothetically).

    I'm not picking on you btw, I also believe drunk drivers should receive minimal medical attention, and frequent players of a probably injury-causing sport should have extra medical insurance to cover when injuries happen. Even if all it does is pay back their costs to the nhs.
     
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  4. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    Yes.
    Like T2 diabetics deserve treatment.. rugby players with broken legs and arms and drunk drivers all "deserve treatment"
    That's how it works see.
    So why should we all pay into it (and almost all of us have, me probably a lot more than you) if you think treatment should be selective? If you want a privatised system then say so.
     
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  5. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
    Staff Member Administrator

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    Ladies and gents, boys and girls, let's keep it civil here.
     
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  6. Alexandra100

    Alexandra100 Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    As I wrote above, "Anyone catching Covid risks passing it on to others, especially if they need hospital care. The main point of vaccination is not to protect the individual vaccinated. That can never be done 100%. It is to lower the risks for the whole community."
     
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  7. Alexandra100

    Alexandra100 Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    I have not made myself clear. I was absolutely not suggesting that the NHS should refuse treatment to those whose health problems can be seen as self-inflicted or who are in some way undeserving. It is a glory of the NHS and civilization that even a terrorist who has just inflicted death and horrific injuries on a crowd of people and been injured in the process will be transported to hospital and given the same level of care as his victims.
     
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  8. Alexandra100

    Alexandra100 Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    As a woman of 78, I am not about to start worrying about possible harm to any unborn child I may be carrying. I imagine pregnant women will not be high on the list for priority vaccination.
     
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  9. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  10. Andydragon

    Andydragon Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Everyone has a choice.

    But part of the point of vaccines is, as mentioned on here, to build up an immunity in the community. It’s why there is such a risk of anti-vaxxers. Measles and other childhood diseases are on the rise due to this

    over used term but in effect herd immunity
     
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  11. hankjam

    hankjam Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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  12. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    See post #29

    Some are already making exploratory moves to cover mandatory vaccination under mental health laws. Of course it's possible nothing will ever come of it, but it shouldn't be dismissed lightly. A year ago no one would have imagined that government would gain sweeping powers that allow them to do whatever they want with virtually no parliamentary oversight, yet look where we are now.
     
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  13. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
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    Folks, as I understand matters, the topic of this thread is the order of prioritisation for the administering of the COVID vaccine, and where those living with diabetes fit into that.

    It is not about the morals or otherwise of those who wish to take up, or pass on their opportunity for vaccination, or political debate. Should you want to go around those loops yet again, please do so on another thread dedicated to that.

    Thank you.
     
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  14. NicoleC1971

    NicoleC1971 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    To go back to the OP query.
    I do not know however if we know there are 12 millon over 65s and we need 2 doses that takes us to 24 millon already.
    Add on careworkers and NHS frontline staff (1.6 mill is the total no. of NHS staff ).
    So being under 65 and with no co morbidities, it is right that I am at the back of the queue and personally I do not want to get to the front of it anyway!
     
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  15. SamA

    SamA Type 2 · Member

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    I think the vaccine priority is muddled; I would prioritise health and care workers; then workers (of any age) with things like D to get back to work and get economy and life going with least risk.

    Then I’d move on to the age scale
     
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  16. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hi,

    I feel theoretically the model you propose could be risky to the more vulnerable?

    Hypothetically I could think. "It ok, I've had the vaccination." Go about my business as usual with others thinking the same.
    The "guard"could be dropped at work. I could also be coming into contact in a bar or a gig with someone as venues reopen. (You got no idea how much I miss doing the live music.)

    I could be running about asymptomatic?? Along with others..But it's OK, We've had the jab.... Meet up with my elderly mum living in her bubble cared for by my younger sister, at the "back of the queue."
    Hey presto, betrayed by a hug....
     
  17. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    I quite like this interim list of priorities. It is attempting to protect health care workers and the most vulnerable first. We must try to protect the very elderly and frail in care homes so they can see their loved ones in their last stage of life. It is heartbreaking to see care home residents so isolated from all those they hold dear and is causing many of them to curl up and die before their time because of it. I hope everyone with loved ones in care homes can appreciate this.
     
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  18. lovinglife

    lovinglife Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Whilst I have my reservations about the vaccine totally agree with you on this @Bluetit1802 this virus has been devastating for the elderly in care homes and as someone who had a parent in a care home up until last Christmas my blood runs cold thinking how my dad would have coped with all this if he’d still been here, he was on end of life care and it would have broken me to see him go through this - no way for anyone to live their last days
     
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  19. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    Elderly people in care homes will have a high % of medical conditions, including breathing difficulties ie COPD, Heart problems, Parkinsons disease and dementia ( not being able to take care of themselves ) to name a few, is a big factor. The average age is around 87 and the length of stay is around 30 months,
    So their chances of a longer life are not great anyway, with or without the vaccine
    Edited - if my dad was still alive I would want him to have the vaccine,
     
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    #39 Robinredbreast, Nov 12, 2020 at 1:52 PM
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2020
  20. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    My dad was in a care home and a good one too until he passed away in January 2018 aged 94. The thought of not being able to see him in these uncertain times, like you, would of broken me too.
     
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