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Dentist

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by Jordi77, Jun 6, 2016.

  1. Jordi77

    Jordi77 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I've just come back from getting a tooth out and it is made worse due to the diabetes as it had a absess under it via the diabetes so now I am happy it is out but I have been told that due to me having diabetes that it will distroy your teeth as it has something to do with the acid that you produce and it doesn't matter how much you clean them that is all he said
     
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  2. urbanracer

    urbanracer Type 1 · Expert
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  3. Jordi77

    Jordi77 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @ Urbanracer


    That's all and true but we still suffer with absess's which we get under the teeth and diabetes softens the teeth which I am sure that you didn't know of but it is true as when I had the one before this one out it was soft and damaged by my diabetes as he had to check it out on the computer to make sure that it wasn't due to something else and it was really soft as it broke but it showed that diabetes was the cause of it
     
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  4. KevinPotts

    KevinPotts Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    All need to me as a newbie. Thanks a lot for the straightforward advice :)


    Diagnosed 13/4/16: T2, no meds, HbA1c 53, FBG 12.6, Trigs 3.6, HDL .75, LDL 4.0, BP 169/95, 13st 8lbs, waist 34" (2012 - 17st 7lbs, w 42").

    2/6/16: FBG AV 4.6, Trigs 1.5, HDL 2.0, LDL 3.0, BP 120/72, 11st 11lbs, waist 30" (2012 - 17st 7lbs, w 42").

    Regime: 20g LCHF, run 1 mile daily, weekly fasting.

    5/6/16: Two BP readings now 112/64 & 112/66 :)
     
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  5. lovinglife

    lovinglife Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Never heard of this and can't find anything on the net about it other than we are no more at risk of problem teeth than anyone else as long as we keep our blood sugar well controlled and have good mouth care routine - if you can post a link with the info in I would be grateful as my dentist says my teeth are good and should have no problems as long as I comply with the above - I can't find anything on soft teeth and diabetes at all - gonna ask my dentist next time see what he says - interesting
     
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  6. Jordi77

    Jordi77 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I was at the dental hospital for it to be taken out so that is how I got to now and it is available from most dental surgeries if you ask but you need to ask about it otherwise you will never know it's the same as if you drink fizzy pop apart from it's diabetes that does it
     
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  7. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    I've had diabetes for 35 years and never had a abscess....... even when my bg levels wasn't very well controlled.

    Maybe ask your dentist for a fuller explanation @Jordi77
     
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  8. Jordi77

    Jordi77 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    An absess is caused by either a in growing hair or a infection and it is a collection of bad blood mixed with puss which is a cream ish colour and is hard and sore and I have had quite a few which have been lanced in hospital under general anaesthetic and just a local anaesthetic but before they do lance them they are sore as hell and you can't do much because of the pain they cause
     
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  9. catherinecherub

    catherinecherub · Guest

    Dental abcess.
    http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/Dental-abscess/Pages/Introduction.aspx

    A dental abscess is a collection of pus that can form inside the teeth, in the gums, or in the bone that holds the teeth in place. It’s caused by a bacterial infection.

    An abscess at the end of a tooth is called a periapical abscess. An abscess in the gum is called a periodontal abscess.

    Dental abscesses are often painful, but aren’t always. In either case, they should be looked at by a dentist.

    It's important to get help as soon as possible, because abscesses don't go away on their own. They can sometimes spread to other parts of the body and make you ill.

    This page covers:

    Symptoms of a dental abscess

    What to do if you have a dental abscess

    Relieving your symptoms

    Treatments for a dental abscess

    What causes dental abscesses?

    Preventing dental abscesses
     
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  10. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    @Jordi77 my dentist said similiar but not diabetes causes damaged teeth or receding gums but the meds we take. For diabetes.
    My dental nurse sister who trained in the late 90s repeats same mantra of if you have good dental hygiene its irrespective.
    I think we know a lot more about long use of type 2 diabetic drugs now. Way more than in the 90s. They won't be the first nor last to be out of date with their literature. However I'd also be interested in medical data to back up our claims.
    All drugs have side affects. If bone density can be weakened on long term drugs, so can teeth. Enamel can out live any human but fizzy drinks and fruit can damage enamel which keeps the tooth hard.
     
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  11. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Expert
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    Good dental hygiene is essential for any diabetic as if there is an infection it will cause the blood glucose levels to rise - as is also keeping blood glucose levels in a good range as with more glucose floating around in the blood will give rise to any prevailing infections. I have had 2 abscesses since being diagnosed and lost 2 teeth, both times I had uncontrollable BG levels, so keeping an eye on dental care is now a top priority for me.
     
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  12. Oldvatr

    Oldvatr Type 2 · Expert

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    This seems to be a chicken /egg situation. Diseased teeth cause the abcess. Gum disease causes bad teeth, so does diabetes cause gum disease?

    i was a smoker and this was contributary to my dental probs. I have always had soft dentine but hard enamel, so once a carie appears, the whole tooth goes soon after. Bit like a mint imperial. None of my dentists associated diabetes with abcesses, but then i did not have that trouble.

    But there is an apparent link between gum disease and CVE's.
     
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  13. yingtong

    yingtong Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I have been T1 for over 54 years and I am 67 old and have all my teeth and only one filling,I have maintained good dental hygiene all my life.
     
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  14. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    What is CVEs?
     
  15. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    My calcium filled diet has helped me lose no teeth at 45yrs old. Some agemates have some missing, all none diabetic thou.
    I grew up in a fluoride supplemented water supply. Now my kids do too.
    I've never smoked or took drugs other than prescribed ones.
    They are starting to deteriate but I'm getting older.
    I have off white teeth due to too many antibiotics as a child. They stain your teeth, or they used too.
     
  16. Oldvatr

    Oldvatr Type 2 · Expert

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    Cardio Vascular Events (heart attacks, strokes et al)
     
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  17. dbr10

    dbr10 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    If you have high blood glucose, you are more likely to get infections; that is why trying to control it is important. You should probably have your teeth cleaned every three months instead of the usual six.
     
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  18. Erin

    Erin Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Jordi77. I'm sorry you developed an absess due to diabetes. I also have one, though I think it may have been years of tooth deteriation. Having a phobia, my Chief dentist proceeded with two major anesthesia operations about 8 years ago. He now wants to take all remaining teeth out and found left ventricular hypertrophy and so wants me to check again with my dr. an EKG so he can give me an intrafusal drug.
    He says it is very important to stop an absess because it may turn to sepsis. Help. Anyone have some advice?
     
  19. Tabbyjoolz

    Tabbyjoolz Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I've had two visits to my dentist over the past week, the last being to replace a filling and repair a damaged tooth. I mentioned my T2 status to him during the check-up and he said that untreated diabetes can make your saliva more sugary, which then attacks your teeth. He added that people on diabetes medication sometimes get dry mouths and this can exacerbate gum disease if they don't drink enough water.

    He was pleased that I have cut out sugar and most carbs and we were both happy that, apart from my cracked tooth and elderly filling on its last legs, my teeth were otherwise in good nick and free of new cavities owing to sugary saliva.
     
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