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Dexcom CGM sensors have just gone from expensive to ridiculous!

Discussion in 'Insulin Pump Forum' started by Platinum, May 23, 2014.

  1. Spiker

    Spiker Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    No, you can shower, bathe and swim with the transmitter attached. There is no way to remove it without starting a brand new sensor. Sometimes if you are in the water a long time the sensor connection to the receiver fails temporarily. But it usually recovers automatically, and if not, you can restart the same sensor.
     
  2. CarbsRok

    CarbsRok Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    It's advised you do not take the transmitter off as can dislodge the sensor. The transmitter is waterproof though. Water will only get under the transmitter and in contact with the sensor if not clicked home properly.
    Must admit if I have a problem with the ??? it's due to sensor movement ie not stuck down well enough. So after reading Pauline's master class on how to keep a sensor stuck down I did a few adaptions and solved the problem.
     
  3. CarbsRok

    CarbsRok Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    It can be done because I managed to do it after realising I hadn't got the transmitter on properly thus water on the connection. Would be a lot easier with two people rather than just yourself.
     
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  4. iHs

    iHs · Well-Known Member

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    @Spiker and CarbsRok .... thanks for explaining... I'm still on the fence wondering what to do for the best but it makes sense cost wise to use Dexcom and not the Libre... I think I'll be Dexing later this month unless other medical sources tell me to wait..... If I get stuck and not sure what the instructions really mean, I'll come online

    Cheers :)
     
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  5. Spiker

    Spiker Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Impressive! I wouldn't have attempted it.
     
  6. CarbsRok

    CarbsRok Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Being tight I wasn't going to lose a sensor if I could help it. Where needs must :)
     
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  7. Chas C

    Chas C Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Sorry if I was not clear - you do not need to take it off nor stop it when you shower or bathe.

    If however you get too much water in between the sensor and the Transmitter, you can either unclip the transmitter and dry it off then clip it back into the sensor (after the shower/bath).

    Or you can use a hair dryer without removing anything to dry around them both.

    In both the above do not stop the transmitter.

    One last word of caution, nothing to do with this subject, if you remove the transmitter from the Sensor then do not try to remove the Sensor from you otherwise the sensor pin can become dislodged and remain inserted in you. When removing the sensor always ensure the Transmitter is clipped into it.
     
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  8. Iamcalledphilip

    Iamcalledphilip Type 1 · Member

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    I'm thinking of getting a Cgm and am interested in thee comments. I think I can justify £1000 upfront cost but the cost of replacing the sensors at £250 a month is another matter. I wonder what is ten average annual cost of sensors. Any suggestions?
     
  9. Spiker

    Spiker Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Other users have better long term stats than me but I think you can count on getting an average of at least two uses per sensor.
     
  10. CarbsRok

    CarbsRok Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I averaged about 3 weeks each sensor to start with, but after reading all the comments and advice by other users can now average 4 weeks with last sensor lasting 47 days.
    Do be aware though you will need to replace the transmitter yearly. It's guaranteed for 6 months only.
     
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  11. schreis

    schreis Type 1 · Member

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    With an active 5 yr old, we seriously cant get more than 5-7 days max out of a sensor. Once ??? Start popping up reading are inaccurate so we just save the hassle and change it every week:(
     
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