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Diabetes Burnout.

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by catherinecherub, Mar 26, 2010.

  1. Jonnyjibbsuk

    Jonnyjibbsuk · Guest

    -️read
     
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  2. Living-by-the-beach

    Living-by-the-beach Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    @Natalie1974

    The other diabetes site has a different attitude. You are on the good diabetes site.. Its great to hear the support of your guy. I hope that that works out for you both. Check out references for Dr Jason Fung on this site too. You may find his work helpful also.
     
  3. anna29

    anna29 Type 2 · Well-Known Member
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    Great thread - really interesting to read .
    Have found it helpful and informative .
     
  4. christi99

    christi99 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I think one of the most important feeling you identified in your post was the feeling of shame when your numbers were not optimal. Many (maybe all medical professionals) react this way- disappointment, scolding, anger, whatever and fail to see how negative reactions does very little to help someone want to connect with what they need to do. You just go into avoidance mode. Especially when everything else seems bad. Everyone has a breaking point. I think it is so important to be able to recognize the red flags and figure out what it is you need to recharge. Like you said, when you started the low carb diet and started to get happy numbers, it reinforced the positive feelings you have- and kept you striving. The positive feelings are a reward in addition to good BG numbers - a positive feedback loop.. Thanks for sharing- I am going to pass your remarks to my son who is in a similar place you were in. :)
     
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  5. nicdavcamb

    nicdavcamb Type 1 · Member

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    This thread is again same old same old. Have been a Diabetic for nearly 60 years insulin from day one and have gone through diet change after diet changed. My insulin changes are now 5 times now. In last few years have been on Glargin and soluble insulin. This has been good and easier to monitor with carb counting, only trouble being so far have found only one blood monitor that can be adjusted by you or medical staff (Diabetic Nurse) , which actually tells you how much soluble insulin to take before each meal or snacks etc. Burn out has been around for most of the time I have been a diabetic and has been recognised for a number of years. The problem now is the failure of Hospitals in not doing all the test annually that are recommended.. Since moving from Surrey to Cambridgeshire, have found that the treatment has got worse not better. So to keep on and on about Burn outs, is it a bit much when treatment has deteriorated so much. I have heart problems have had 4way bypass, Now after 15 years of that have heart failure. But the treatment has got worse waiting times horrendous, then cancellation after cancellation to the clinics. Is it any wonder we have burn out
     
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  6. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    nicdavcamb
    I am so sorry you think this thread is the same old, same old.
    I put this information on the forum because of the many, many young adults with type 1 who have real difficulty with diabetes, The burn out is new to them and many are fighting their diabetes, but hopefully some will find, even in just one sentence, something to relate to or to click on the counselling link. But it is here for everyone with diabetes and if it can change or alter a persons outlook on their condition and get positives from it, then surely its not the same old.

    Regards and best wishes to you, RRB
     
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  7. quattro610

    quattro610 Type 2 · Newbie

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    I was diagnosed type 2 about 18 months ago after a regular blood test for my thyroid ( take thyroxin for that) which was diagnosed 2 years before that. |I have always been a happy go lucky kind of guy and not much has ever stressed me out. I also have had asthma for 20 years and getting stressed out of upset with that alone is a no no. My wife has had clinical depression for the last 10 years and was finally diagnosed Jan 2015 after having a breakdown. With 2 kids the last few years have been a real struggle. Keeping the kids happy with their mother being a ticking time bomb as she changes moods in a nano second is bad enough as and you cannot reason with someone who is paranoid, OCD and mentally depressed. I can put up with the problems but the worst is living with someone who will not help herself let alone me. Doing literally everything, having a full time job with the added pressure of holding the family together without any form of comfort, reassurance, love and warmth from the one that is supposed to give this to her husband from within is the killer. The Kids are my world so I will do what is needed for them. A divorce is the best option and friendswho I have taken into my confidence cannot understand why I have not done this and love to give me their point of view which I do not need or want so I keep people at arms length so I don't have the stress of others who know best. Having someone to listen and not judge or tell me what is best for me would be a real boost... but People being people ... well I do not hold out to much hope. Just feels good sometimes to shout it out. Time to chill , regroup and carry on the fight. Thanks for posting it was an interesting read.
     
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  8. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    A reference to a book from Type 1 discovery magazine, News from JDRF.

    Diabetes Burnout : What to do When You Can't Take it Anymore, by Dr Polonsky. It includes case histories, statistics and useful tactics.
    RRB
     
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  9. Flowerpot

    Flowerpot Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    In 37 years of Type 1 I've never had anyone ask about my state of mind towards dealing with diabetes and I found the article really interesting, it ticked a lot of boxes with me. The factual, scientific data is always analysed at my clinic because it's there in printed form but the only time I have had help in dealing with any aspects of coping with a chronic illness was from an eating disorders clinic where I was helped to recover from anorexia.

    For the first time in decades, I feel like I've hit a diabetes brick wall, I've lived through losing my sight completely, I lived with no sight for 12 months and getting through that period of my life made me think if I can cope with that then I can cope with anything but at present that doesn't feel the case. I know perfectly well I can't neglect my diabetes care and I have no intention of ever going there again. I'm fighting to save my leg from amputation and I feel like I have an almost physical weight on my shoulders, I'm trying my best to get everything as right as I can with absolutely no wriggle room.

    I can only assume this is diabetes burnout, I can't put my finger on what's making me feel so upset and scared for the future. I'm not depressed but just feel utterly worn down by the fear and worry of what's to come. I don't link burnout with anything to do with getting hospital appointments and receiving care, for me that's just frustration when things don't work quite as I'd wish. For me burnout is a realistic dread of complications, swimming against the tide. What is keeping me going is the fact I need to do everything i possibly can in order to keep hold of the precious bit of sight I regained and keep both my precious legs attached to my body.

    Thanks for posting the article RRB:)
     
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  10. nicdavcamb

    nicdavcamb Type 1 · Member

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    You have said nothing new this goes way back in time. The only difference is that we now have forums where this can be aired. So again as a Diabetic type 1 for 59 years, hI have heard and seen many yes many young diabetics with difficulties, me also being one of them.
     
  11. christi99

    christi99 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Wow, I think I can put my finger on what is making you feel so scared- blindness and potential amputation! I am so sorry you have to go through this. These are huge losses and I think most if not all would have to feel grief, fear etc. (I have lost nearly all of my hearing in 2 1/2 years and the losses associated with that impact me every single time I interact with anyone, try to engage in life or well, communicate! I also have a mobility issue with vertigo so I am not as independent, and I am 51 and live alone - sorry not trying to make it about me but I really can understand your fear at the deepest level).
    When diabetics start to have permanent changes in their health (whether renal, cardiovascular, vision etc) it becomes such a reality. I have spent the last 25 yrs caring for this population, so I know what can be the realities, but my son thinks nothing is ever going to happen to him, so he does very little. Ya, he doesn't like to feel hypo, or frequent infections but he is 26 and he wants to live like the rest of young people. But I can understand too.
    I can really get how burn-out can happen to anyone really at any time. (I am a real sweets and carbs eater- and it has been like giving up enjoying food completely because every choice I make is blood glucose related and well it just is work!) I have never been overweight, so I didn't have to think much about it- except when I was pregnant and on insulin. Now...it is tiresome to always make the choice that usually doesn't feel very good- enjoyment wise.

    But you are so right to keep focusing on doing everything to help minimize future complications- it really is all we have control over. Keep the faith and energy where it can best help you. Take care and best wishes!
     
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    #51 christi99, May 6, 2015 at 10:30 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 13, 2015
  12. Living-by-the-beach

    Living-by-the-beach Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    @Princesnikki

    As a T2 soldier in the war on diabetes I too get neuropathy. Thankfully with weight loss approaching 60 lbs I sense I am getting a better grip on this. Tonight I had dinner and with the light lasting later in the day, I hopped on my bicycle and rode 15 miles. I sense too that since I've been extremely aggressive with my exercise I pray to God that I have a sporting chance of putting my T2 into remission. I know that T1 is clearly different from T2 but would exercising going for a bike ride help? I know I am grateful to the person who invented the machine that allows me to exercise (AKA) a bike as it cures all sorts of conditions I am dealing with..

    If @Princesnikki the above ideas are complete gibberish, you can call me out on it, I will be sorry I even piped up with my thoughts. I won't feel offended at all! What gets me going is my doctor who doesn't appreciate the efforts I've put in to improve my health and get rid of him out of my life..

    JM
     
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  13. christi99

    christi99 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I think your thoughts on the subject are great. Exercise is wonderful for everyone- T1 and T2, the only difference is T2 can potentially completely control blood glucose issues via diet and exercise (not always the case- but T1 will always need exogenous supply of insulin). All of the cardiovascular issues that can result from diabetes- or the circulation in any organ, will potentially be improved with increasing O2, burning off cortisol, stress, improve well-being. T1's just have to plan a bit for food/fuel to stabilize them- Some things we have control over- others we don't- so putting energy into the healthiest choices seem to be a smart plan.
     
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    #53 christi99, May 9, 2015 at 5:02 AM
    Last edited by a moderator: May 27, 2015
  14. Living-by-the-beach

    Living-by-the-beach Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    @christi99

    I feel blessed as 4 hours ago my feet were on fire. Now with the benefit of my recent ride/exercise I have no pain currently TG. I am shortly going to shut down my computer but feet are going into zone out mode very quickly..
     
  15. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    Diabetes is here for the long haul. As in liking to a sport, diabetes isn't a 100 meter sprint. it's long distance, a marathon or a never ending hurdle race, which sometimes we get over easily and other times we just keep crashing into the them and it makes us too weary and tired to carry on.
     
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  16. Living-by-the-beach

    Living-by-the-beach Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    @Robinredbreast

    You are 100 % right with the marathon analogy. Diabetes is a marathon. On the other hand diabetes, I feel, needs one to be a sprinter too . If you've ever looked at sprinters they tend to be very well built as in Usain Bolt. However distance runners like Sebastian Coe back in the day was fairly wiry as I recall. So my physical coach has me doing sprints & weights to become muscular which brings my body fat ratios down. So my BMI has come down from 30 to less than 24. Yes we are in agreement diabetes is a marathon (& for me of sprints) We may have to fight this fight for a very long time.. Unless of course the medical industry comes up with a cure.
     
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  17. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    I think we are always hoping for that eureka moment. a cure or something very near to that word.:joyful:

    If I was a runner, It would definitely be the 100 meters, a sprinter.

    Best wishes RRB
     
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  18. Living-by-the-beach

    Living-by-the-beach Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    @Robinredbreast

    I am endeavoring to get some help for Salk Institute http://www.salk.edu/ra/diabetes.html they have some non-conventional thinking + they may already have the raw science to fix both T1 & T2 . The importance of this is that just like in the WWII a small change can move the the cure

    "Needed by so many but created by so Few".

    I particularly like that Salk's researchers are not beholden to some big pharma corporation that needs to make money of their work but more about getting cures. This means we'll get a cure eventually. We all need cures..T1 & T2..
     
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    #58 Living-by-the-beach, May 9, 2015 at 3:45 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: May 9, 2015
  19. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    Thanks for the information, but this thread is for those who have had enough of diabetes and need a little help, understanding and some positive motivation to get through that brick wall that we sometimes get.
     
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  20. louch1

    louch1 · Well-Known Member

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    I am type 2 diabetic since oct 14. I have had some amazing support from work colleges . They have experienced it because of close family members.
    My husband feels I should be able to control it by eating heathly( which I do ) no support there . I hate my meds. I hate the way people forget you are diabetic and offer sweets or cakes - I work in a school. I know I am so so lucky compared to others but I do understand how people get and feel so low and are in the burn out.good luck everyone.
     
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