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Diabetic hypochondria & going barefoot

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by Nicole T, Jul 29, 2020.

  1. aealexandrou

    aealexandrou Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    You should go to your GP and have it checked out. There is little that can be done medically for diabetic neuropathy. If the tingling and irritation gets too much they can prescrib gabapentin to reduce the symptoms.
    It looks like your at an early stage. You need to halt or reverse the condition by going on a strict low carb high fat diet, or similar such as KETO or Paleo. Nerve cells can regrow, but you need to practise intermittent fasting to trigger stem cell growth. It is though very slow. I estimate that it will take me about 2 more years to reverse most if not all my neuropathy.
    Unless you have lost feeling in your feet I wouldn't worry about walking barefoot. Your feet are designed to walk bare and its excellent for your posture and general health.


    Edited by moderator
     
    #21 aealexandrou, Jul 31, 2020 at 6:21 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 31, 2020
  2. Goonergal

    Goonergal Type 2 · Moderator
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    I don’t go barefoot very often but mainly because my feet are always cold! Currently using the fitflop variety of flip flops around the house on instructions of a podiatrist to avoid pressure on my Achilles which was damaged earlier this year.

    Outside the house I’m invariably in trainers. Current brand of choice is ASICS as they’re more supportive than my previous preference, Skechers, which are very comfortable - almost like wearing slippers.

    So long as you have good feeling in your feet I don’t think going barefoot is a problem.

    edited to correct punctuation
     
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    #22 Goonergal, Jul 31, 2020 at 6:34 PM
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2020
  3. Goonergal

    Goonergal Type 2 · Moderator
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    Could you provide some references for that claim, please?
     
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  4. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    While I agree neuropathy is something we want to avoid and it's hard to manage from what I've heard, what part of the post makes you think Nicole has an early stage of neuropathy?
    From what I read Nicole gets numb hands from riding her bike, which I can guarantee is perfectly normal. A tingling in one toe in bed sometimes is mentioned as well, which is definitely not enough to diagnose or even suspect neuropathy on. Especially not in someone newly diagnosed.
    Neuropathy usually takes years and years of high blood sugar before it appears, I see nothing in Nicoles posts suggesting she has neuropathy of any stage.
     
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    #24 Antje77, Jul 31, 2020 at 7:13 PM
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2020
  5. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I am a life long barefooter. I still have feeling in my feet and blood glucose is controlled so I see no additional danger for me personally. If either of those statements change then maybe I’ll have to change my habits but not til then.

    we have a pair of family crocs that must be 15yrs old now. My husband thinks they are his but he’s wrong ;). Whilst they are his size our 3 boys have grown into them in that time and they fit easily over the sock type slippers I wear in winter. The live by an outside door and are excellent for nipping outside (To the bin/car/garden etc) without having to find real footwear.
     
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  6. Fruitella

    Fruitella Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I have the Skecher ones and much prefer them, very smooth on the inside. I love going barefoot too but am getting better at slipping them on when popping out to the garden.
     
  7. aard

    aard · Well-Known Member

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    i too now worry about neuropathy with every tiny tingle in my legs.

    My big toe has been numb for about 10 years. GPs/diabetic nurse just dismiss it as nerve damage and say its nothing to do with diabetes which is probably correct as only been diabetic for year.

    Bug it still doesnt stop me thinking I'm about to lose my leg from diabetes
     
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  8. TriciaWs

    TriciaWs Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    I have mild peripheral neuropathy, a 'non-diabetic' cause that predates my T2 by a few years, and after the T2 diagnosis was told very firmly never to go barefoot. I loved going barefoot in the house, in the garden, on grass but now reluctantly wear closed toe mules.
    One good reason is that neuropathy, arthritis plus general clumsiness means I drop stuff on my feet and lose my balance a lot - I've broken most of my toes at least once some at least three times. I can still break toes while wearing footwear but less frequently.
     
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  9. Ceppo

    Ceppo Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    What about some nice Birkenstock Arizonas? I love them. For home that is - not the mud of a campsite:)
     
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  10. Flora123

    Flora123 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Yes of course it goes without saying that it depends on the individual, but if you are well controlled and heal well, there shouldn’t be a problem if you are careful and keep an eye on your feet!
     
  11. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
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    Ladies, and gents - my apologies for my part in deflecting this thread towards Crocs clogs - jazzed up or otherwise, but could we pay attention to Nicole's topic please?
     
  12. Andydragon

    Andydragon Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    There is a risk on going barefoot. Maybe the risk is reduced or very low but from my own viewed experience, it can be a significant danger

    the NHS advise not going barefoot in certain circumstances. So the question was whether it is a good idea. Outside of the house, My answer is no, it’s not. Why increase your risk unnecessarily?

    personally having dislocated and broken my toe by kicking furniture accidentally in the past I know I should do better!
     
  13. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    The point is if you are well controlled, with sensation, is the risk any higher than if you were not diabetic. Probably not in my opinion. Of course anyone can cut or break their foot without the protection of shoes. (And even that isn’t a guarantee unless you’re wearing ppe style boots!)
     
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  14. Bittern

    Bittern Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    My understanding is that diabetics have poorer blood flow to the feet and as a consequence any damage done to the foot is slower to heal hence the recommendation not to go barefoot. If you couple the slower healing with neuropathy where you may not feel an injury the risk of consequent major damage is considerably increased. But its your choice some places are safer than others.
     
  15. aealexandrou

    aealexandrou Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Most newly diagnosed T2D have probably been suffering from high blood sugars years before they detect that they are diabetic. You don't even need to have diabetes to suffer neuropathy as it is a sympton of long term sugar contamination and insulin resistance on its own. If she was simply suffering the occasional numbness to her hands specifically from the pressure when riding her bike, then its unlikely to be an issue, but the reference to numbness in her toe, the fact that she is diabetic, are indices of neuropathy and she should get herself checked out. I waited to long to check out my neuropathy and by that time it had spread to my hands and feet. It is what alerted me to the fact that I had a diabetes issue, which proved to be the case after I attended my GP. You should never rely on these or any post for a diagnosis. Your GP may no nothing about nutrition and treating diabetes with diet, but will be well trained in diagnosing the illness.
     
  16. aealexandrou

    aealexandrou Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Dr Berstein's Diabetic University - Session 43 Neuropathy
     
  17. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Ouch. Still anyone mowing the lawn without suitable footwear is taking that chance. I thought this was about additional risks of diabetes, rather than the obvious ones that apply to all.
     
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  18. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Bit of an overreaction to my comments, can’t for the life of me think why I would report your comments.

    No one, diabetic or not, should be mowing barefoot or they are at risk of injury was my point. Yes I can see and agree that the complications of diabetes, if you have them, could slow healing considerably.
     
  19. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    Poorly controlled maybe..?
     
  20. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    Could we all keep in mind what the original question of the thread was?
    Thanks in advance!
     
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