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Diabetic Personal Training

Discussion in 'Fitness, Exercise and Sport' started by original_woodie, Feb 19, 2018.

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Would you attend a Diabetes specific Personal Trainer

  1. Yes

  2. No

Results are only viewable after voting.
  1. original_woodie

    original_woodie Other · Newbie

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    Recently diagnosed with Diabetes (still waiting on a full T1 or T2 diagnosis but that's a different story)

    Coincidentally diagnosed at a time when I was weighing up a career change and retraining as a personal trainer. I carry a little weight but until recently regularly participated in various sports and long distance running. You can imagine the blow of discovering I'm diabetic but I'm keen to embrace this lifestyle change and use it as a positive in my life going forwards.

    With the knowledge of Diabetes (I'm not saying I'm an expert- but in my experience neither are the GP's!!) I've gained in recent months about my condition I realize how important healthier easting, exercise and perhaps more importantly knowledge and support can be

    I'm looking at setting up Personal Training with a slant towards specifically Diabetic members/clients; most personal trainers I've spoken to, seem a little naïve on the matter, but have expressed reservations in even taking on Diabetic Patients. The idea would be to support increased exercise and fitness regimes, alongside of dietary planning and advise support and encouragement

    I'd be looking to cover various levels of exercise to suitable high level intensity to cover those more capable, through to more gentle exercise to the less able/starters, I've even potentially a Diabetic Nurse who is willing to assist.

    Would this be something you would specifically consider? Would you pay a regular fee for twice weekly classes/support groups? What would you like to see from such an experience.?

    Do you attend Personal Training Session or Boot Camps as a Diabetic - what knowledge/understanding is there to your condition, or is it left to yourself ?

    While I appreciate I'd be limited by the region currently reside in at first. I'm very keen to tap into the level of interest as I consider the viability

    Appreciate this borders on Market Research; so apologies if I step on any forum rules/regulations
     
  2. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Master

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    I'd be interested to hear your definition of "healthier eating".
    Not a great believer in excessive exercise so to answer your question no I wouldn't pay for coaching.
     
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  3. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I would not use a “diabetes specific personal trainer” as I know that “low carb” is the key, and that without it, exercise does not work, and with it, I don’t need much exercise.

    But lots of people with Type2 are told by their GPs to exercise more, and we do know that HIIT and resistance training does reduce insulin resistance. So if you can set up as a personal trainer aimed at people who do not know about “low carb”, then give them the “low carb” message along with the personal training……

    So become a health coach, not a personal trainer, but reach people, due to them being interested in exercise. What you call yourself, and what actions of yours have the most benefit to your clients don’t need to be the same. For example, a steak and egg diet is good for building muscle mass, but is also great for BG control……..

    Look at Primal Play etc and how you can make exercise fun for unfit man, combined with low carb diet support and you may be onto a winner….. Don’t talk about low carb, pretend it is the high protein (without the fat removed) at every meal that is needed, then GPs may even like you.
     
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  4. Diakat

    Diakat Type 1 · Moderator
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    If a PT is trained to level 4 then they should have covered "special populations" which includes diabetics.
     
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  5. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    And training would include getting everyone with diabetes to eat carbs at all meals, and between all meals, along with carb loading before doing anything at the gym.......
     
  6. sally and james

    sally and james Family member · Well-Known Member

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    My husband was encouraged to find a personal trainer by his GP. James was a gym regular, but lacking specialist knowledge (and being inherently lazy in my view) was not getting much out of it. Indeed, when he lost a lot of weight following diagnosis, there was only skin and bone left.
    Perhaps the personal trainer operating out of our local gym was "one in a million", but he has been excellent. He understands diabetes and low carb and has gradually built up James' exercise routine and built up a good musculature for a man of his age. Having weekly appointments with an instructor keeps him focussed and has allowed him to develop his routines.
    I would strongly recommend using a personal trainer, but only if it's what you want to do and you find the trainer who is right for you.
    Sally
     
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  7. Diakat

    Diakat Type 1 · Moderator
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    Not according to my PT friend that works for Equinox... low carb is her mantra.
     
  8. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Things are starting to change at last........
     
  9. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    I suspect that good advice for new diabetics might be not to go at it like a bull at a gate, but build up a regular routine of low impact exercise, rather than - was the term 'going for the burn'?
    I know that I can increase my blood glucose by exercising for an hour, but lower it by doing three ten minute sessions on my trampoline, so testing regularly or using a monitor might be a big help in seeing the effects of the advice.
     
  10. therower

    therower Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    " low carb is the key and with out it exercise does not work"
    Quote of the year!!!!!!!!!
    What a lot of rubbish.
     
  11. Mbaker

    Mbaker Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    I have been reviewing PT training at level 4, as I am considering this, and it does not specifically mention diabetes in the literature I am looking at:

    upload_2018-2-19_16-7-0.png
     
  12. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Expert
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    Errr. What a load of rubbish. Have you ever trained with a proper body transformation programme? The first thing they do is put you on a low carb diet for 3-5 weeks to reduce your insulin output and get you burning fat.

    Then they reintroduce carbs in small amounts, using pulses, etc. There's next to no fast carbs involved, and they're very wary of bread, etc. Generally, low carb is better as you burn fat that way, and most people are targetting a significant body fat reduction. When I was doing a personal training programme, my trainer and I looked at the effects of the training on my glucose levels, timing of insulin, etc in relation to the training and the after effects. He was looking at it in context of the degree he was working through at the time, and he engaged in a low carb diet.

    The whole body transformation process is designed around two key factors. Resistance training to build up muscle mass and improve ability to use food and secondly, to encourage eating to manage the hormonal response to best manage body fat reduction and muscle growth. They are basically focusing on reducing insulin needs and stimulating Human Growth Hormone.

    Regular PTs you get down at Fitness First probably don't have a clue about this stuff, but the guys who make specialise in body transformation absolutely do.

    Not really, for a long time it's been like this (places like Ultimate Performance and Equinox - high end body transformation in other words, and of course sports science in the professional athlete world, where muscle gain and body fat reduction are important for performance), unfortunately though, it's been quite expensive.
     
  13. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I know that all the PT have been told about diabetes at my local gym is that everyone with diabetes must eat carbs before using the gym so as to avoid hypos.... Hence it is very likely someone who needs a PT (and hence does not know how to choose one) will get told to eat carbs.
     
  14. Vinnie P

    Vinnie P · Newbie

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    There seems to be a lot of misconceptions about training and nutrition. Firstly I have been a type 1 for over 30 years and enjoy the gym. yes there are some poorly educated PTs out there as there are poorly educated diabetics. what I would say is if it works for you do it. Nobodies more of an expert in how your body responds than you.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
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