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Diabetics R Us

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by archersuz, Jun 11, 2018.

  1. SaskiaKC

    SaskiaKC Type 2 · Expert

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    I'm glad you said wethers. I was wondering what the goat word was. Same as sheep, then.
     
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  2. SaskiaKC

    SaskiaKC Type 2 · Expert

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    They could be Pygmies. There was a pygmy goat farm where I used to live.
     
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  3. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    Cat is very curious, goats are very curious and a bit wary.
    I'm having a problem, as I want to drink my morning coffee with the goats, but since the cat's brother died he follows me like a dog. And he wants to explore the goats sleeping quarters. As soon as the cat goes in the goats want to follow, which I prevent by carrying the cat back out. If it comes to a confrontation I'd like it to be in the open, where the cat may take a little flying lesson but at least isn't crushed between horns and wall.
    Clearly no way to enjoy your morning coffee with your goats!
    Hopefully things will get easier when the goats get to roam most of the garden, but that will take a little work with fencing and stuff, as @Bluetit1802 pointed out.
    How would I know? I've been way too busy with learning about goats to wonder if they're a particular breed :hilarious:
     
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  4. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    Sounds perfect!
     
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  5. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    No wonder you have been quiet on here. You must have been very busy. Your new home sounds perfect.

    I am doing well so far, thank you. Yesterday we took advantage of the relaxed instructions in England and treated ourselves to a full day out on the River Lune estuary and a picnic in the glorious weather. We encountered no problems at all. It was fairly quiet, social distancing was easy but sad the cafe where we have a coffee when we go there under normal circumstances can't open yet. We have promised ourselves we will do this once a week. It was a first for me. I haven't left our house and garden since the lockdown apart from our daily dog walks and was beginning to get Coronaphobia.

    I have also bitten the bullet and been to the garden centre today. I thoroughly enjoyed it. Everything was well organised. Sanitiser sprays and paper towels before the entrance so we could wipe down the trolleys, another table with hand sanitisers that we were asked to use before going through the door, Stickers on the floors for self distancing (at least 3 meters apart, just to make sure!), one way traffic, restricted numbers allowed in, only 2 people allowed in together, etc etc. I bought a few plants and shrubs and spent the rest of the day planting them.

    My adult granddaughter, who is living with her parents, has got a new job. She started on Monday working on our Covid test, track and trace scheme. It is an initial 12 week contract, all working from home. She is still training this week via video calls and downloads, expecting to be up and running next week, but could be difficult when she has to tell people over the phone that they have been in contact with someone with the virus so must self isolate.
     
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  6. JohnEGreen

    JohnEGreen Other · Master

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    Wethers is a name used for castrated goats.

    And am glad to hear you are happy in your new home.
     
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  7. SaskiaKC

    SaskiaKC Type 2 · Expert

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    Then that's one point on which you and I differ. I would be looking up all I could about the particular breed to learn about feeds, hoofcare, coat and horn care, etc. ! :D
     
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  8. SaskiaKC

    SaskiaKC Type 2 · Expert

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    Great to hear that you were able to get out! I think the whole world has Coronaphobia -- that's our main problem. I don't have it; I do have a fear of losing my freedoms. I'm glad England is loosening up a little; America is too, and it has freed me to make this move. I'm in 2 weeks' quarantine at my new place because it's a senior apartment building, just like my previous one, but my friends who moved me here are even older than I am and they're free to go where they like. We stopped to eat on the drive here the other day, and while we could not go in to sit and eat, we could use the drive-up window, and, after lunch, the rest rooms/toilets!

    It is actually very peaceful and pleasant being in quarantine because I don't have to be overwhelmed with meeting lots of new people and lots of new group activities. I can sit and look out my window onto the woods and the fields and smell the newmown grass. I haven't even unpacked my TV yet; what's outside my patio door is much nicer. :)
    '
     
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    #5288 SaskiaKC, May 21, 2020 at 8:30 PM
    Last edited: May 21, 2020
  9. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    I guess I'm in the very beginner stage where information about goats in general is overwhelming enough! Hoof care seems to be a thing. Thank god their hoofs look very good at the moment, there is time to try to convince them being touched is not a good reason to head-butt me!
     
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  10. Big Bad Buncey

    Big Bad Buncey · Newbie

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    Firstly, I like the fact that you have called this post "diabetics r us". A couple of years ago we were setting up a local group and I was expressly forbidden by Diabetes UK from sending out a dog walking leaflet with the text "meet up with other diabetics and their canine friends". In fact, I was told that it was offensive. I had a long discussion on the phone about it with a representative who insisted I change it to "people with diabetes". I asked her if she was diabetic - she was not. I asked her how she could possibly know it was offensive? I won't bore you with the hour long discussion on the semantics of the situation, needless to say, we did not part on the best of terms! Anyway, the only defence I can offer for there being separate forums for T1 and T2 is the very different natures of the treatments. I've been T1 for 35 years and my partner has recently been diagnosed T2. I was very surprised with how ill prepared I was for dealing with the different issues his treatment threw up. All the focus with my T1 has been allowing me (within reason) to eat what I want. DAFNE (dose adjustment for normal eating) is the root of all that. The focus with T2 is portion control, weight loss etc etc and there is surprisingly little crossover. That being said, the emotional impact of both conditions is totally comparable. You are inevitably trying to cope with a condition that you're gonna be stuck with for the rest of your life. Never an easy thing to come to terms with. What I'm saying is that I don't think the different forums were set up maliciously and a joint one will be great for finding common ground. Also, if anyone can explain why "diabetics" is offensive I'd appreciate it. (We have left the auspices of Diabetes UK and now run the group through the hospital...)
     
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  11. Mike d

    Mike d Type 2 · Expert

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    What's her name? Trudeau?
     
  12. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    For me, personally, I happily say I'm a diabetic.
    There are others who feel rather strong about not wanting to be called a diabetic, so I try to avoid it. If it upsets them, why would I say it? Besides, if it upsets them enough to react to it, you'll lose the plot of your conversation.

    What I've heard most from people who dislike being called a diabetic is that having diabetes doesn't define who they are, they are a lot of other things too. Hopefully someone feeling strongly about this will chip in, they obviously can explain it much better than I can :)

    To my thinking, I'm a lot of things: a sailor, a dog-lover, a friend, a reader, a pain in the backside at times, and a diabetic.
    None of those things define me, yet I don't see why we would have to refer to me as a person who sails, a person who loves dogs, a person who knows people they like and who like them back, a person who reads, a person who sometimes acts like an annoying pedant or a person with diabetes.
    Seems pretty complicating to me, but hey, if people don't like to be called a diabetic, I don't mind not doing so.

    Would your wife feel like having a peek around here, as she's newly diagnosed? We have many lovely and knowledgable T2's (excuse me, people with T2) on the forum, it could be very helpful.

    While you didn't ask for it, I'll give you the link to the info sheet we like to offer our newly joined T2's, and I'll tag @JoKalsbeek who has written another very informative piece that might be useful to your wife.
    https://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/threads/basic-information-for-newly-diagnosed-diabetics.26870/
     
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  13. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Hello @Big Bad Buncey ,

    First off, for your wife: https://josekalsbeek.blogspot.com/2019/11/the-nutritional-thingy.html . I have to say though, if it's something you can do together, it might help a lot. So if going low carb is an option for you (You'd have to adjust your insulin a lot though, I imagine), you might want to consider it. Thing is, if you can do it together, just cook one meal instead of separate ones etc, it makes life a lot less difficult, with less hassle, and the diet will be easier to adhere to for her. If shje doesn't feel like an odd one out and all, you know? It's hard to "inconvenience" your family with being different, sometimes. But again, this is written for a T2, not a T1, and I don't know how well it'd fit your situation. You sould like you're very supportive as it is, so yay you.

    As for why "Diabetic" might be offensive... Personally, I don't feel it is. The moment someone attaches a lot of negative stigma to it I can see why it'd be hurtful... Rather than just calling a spade a spade with no negative connotations, loading the term with a lot of blame and guilt would be... You know... Unpleasant. I think it's really a matter of intent. It's not something to be ashamed of, it's not something any of us sought out, be it a T1 or a T2, or one of the many, many other types under the Diabetic banner. I'm a diabetic, I have Hashimoto's, Sjögren's, I'm a migraineur, an introverted borderliner (talk about stigma, on TV we're all psycho killers! I'm just very introverted, not about to knife anyone. Yet. Give me a few more weeks of cabin fever and we'll re-evaluate the topic)... I'm an amateur photographer, a cat-mom and a wife. A daughter, a know-it-all and occasionally, a b****. So all in all... Stick and stones. Words can actually hurt me, and a lot, but when it comes down to it, it only gets a negative load if it is given one. But that's my personal opinion. I do find it troubling that someone in an official capacity would get so heated about the word "Diabetic" though. Like it is something shameful. Ah well. Good on you for running the group anyway, through a different channel. ;)

    Anyway, hope the Nutritional Thingy'll help, because with the portion control method, she might still be experiencing high blood sugars while being hungry all the time, and that's not sustainable. (Portion control can work mind you, but it often needs to go hand in hand with other methods.)
    Good luck,
    Jo
     
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  14. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    I tell anyone I'm a diabetic. It matters not to me.

    What really gets my goat, though is when people refer to their nurse as "my diabetic nurse". Unless she actually has diabetes, she is a Diabetes Nurse.
     
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  15. catinahat

    catinahat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    This has got me thinking that if my Diabetes nurse was in fact a Diabetic nurse then maybe, just maybe she would do a little research and start giving advice that actually helped people.
     
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  16. SaskiaKC

    SaskiaKC Type 2 · Expert

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    Good point.
     
  17. SaskiaKC

    SaskiaKC Type 2 · Expert

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    @JoKalsbeek Lovely kitty avatar. :)

    I sympathize with what you posted. I am very introverted, with a number of social and other phobias; if I were to start listing all my "labels" to people their eyes would just glaze over and they would avoid me from then on. Either that, or they would tell me to just "get a grip" and join them in whatever activity they love that I would love if the whole thing didn't terrify me so.

    So I don't tell people I'm diabetic/have diabetes, have panic disorder, anxiety disorder, mitral valve prolapse syndrome dysautonomia, or agoraphobia, unless they ask, and the manner of their asking determines whether or not I try to answer them. It is easier for them to think I am a wuss, a wimp, and sometimes it's also easier on me to not have to struggle to join them. My cat doesn't care.
    ^. .^
     
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  18. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Cats are wonderful like that. This is Vicky, and it's her birthday tomorrow! And her brother, Charlie's. Who both look like they could be related to your kitty, by the way. One year old and in full-on destructive puberty mode. All the curtains must die! Headphone cables too! :) Anyway... Labels... I always forget to mention a few, I can't keep track of everything half the time, so can't expect others to... So yeah, the eyes glazing over is familiar, haha. I just found that my life became a whole lot easier when I opened up about my issues, about 15 years ago.... I didn't have to struggle or flat-out lie to appear normal while having a panic attack, or to seem like I was enjoying myself while terrified out of my mind. I finally could just tell people there were certain things I couldn't do, period. Certainly reduced stress and made Christmas more enjoyable. :) (I'm not expected to stay longer or do more than I can do.) Same with the diabetes and other issues that require food adjustments and whatnot. And as it turned out, it was indeed a good way to weed out the fair weather friends/family members. The people around me are the ones who understand, and if they don't, they do understand there's limits to what I can do. Even if they can't quite grasp why, they do respect those limits, more often than not. It did cost me a few people, but then, if they can't take me as I am... What use are they and their very conditional "love" anyway? Not worth the energy and love/heartache I put in.

    But yes. Cats. Cats, cats, cats. ;) They don't make snide remarks, they aren't going to harass you on Facebook or during birthday parties, they're just going to be cats. Meaning, being gods and goddesses in all their glory. :)
     
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  19. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    You're right about the harassing on Facebook, but mine definitely harass me and everybody else on my birthday parties to join in in the food!
     
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  20. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    Very smug goats on the wrong side of the fence...

    [​IMG]
     
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