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Do I have hyperinsulinaemia?

Discussion in 'Prediabetes' started by EmilEmil, Jun 20, 2019.

  1. EmilEmil

    EmilEmil · Member

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    Hi,

    I was diagnosed with "reactive hyperglycemia" and "transient hyperinsulinaemia". Looks like every doctor have their own opinion on that. One are telling me that everything is ok and another one is saying about these two diseases.

    Could anyone confirm that I have it/not have it:)
    I feel that this forum might be more reliable than doctors nowadays;/

    Here are my results. tests were made after 10h fasting (sleeping) on empty stomach in the morning
    Glucose tolerance test:
    1. glucose curve:
    Glucose on an empty stomach: 89.59 mg/dl
    1h after loading 75g of glucose: 148.89 mg/dl
    2h after loading 75g of glucose: 79.29
    After this test I've felt that glucose is still falling to the level when I felt really bad (sweating, shaking hands)

    2. Insuline curve:
    insuline on an empty stomch: 4,4 mU/L
    1h after loading 75g of glucose: 53.4 mU/L
    2h after loading 75g of glucose: 20.7 mU/L
     
  2. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Are you sure it was reactive hypERglycemia not hypOglycemia? If the test was lower and still dropping after 2hrs than the start it sounds more like the latter.
     
  3. EmilEmil

    EmilEmil · Member

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    Ahh sure most probably it was my or doctor;/ mistake (I dont have interpretation with me). What about hyperinsilnaemia?
     
  4. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Sorry I’ve not had any tests for insulin and don’t know much about the test you had. Hopefully someone who knows more will be along soon. Other than most type 2’s at least start with high insulin levels I’ve not heard of transient hyperinsulemia. Im thinking it’s a term under the prediabetic umbrella.

    As for reactive hypoglycaemia there’s a sub forum on here for that and it might be worth having a read through and see if it fits with what’s happening to you.
     
  5. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    This will be confusing at first, you can have hyperinsulinaemia with hyperglycaemia, but also you can have hyperinsulinaemia and hypoglycaemia. And just to add as in my case, I had all three at once!

    Your two hours glucose tolerance test wasn't long enough for a true diagnosis of hypoglycaemia because this usually occurs in conditions called Hypoglycaemia, after three to four hours after the 75g glucose.

    Do you have normal blood sugar levels before eating?
    Do you have any other conditions that effect your hormone levels?
    Have you had any other tests, than the two hours glucose tolerance test?
    What is your Hba1c levels?

    Best wishes

    I am non diabetic, I have a condition called Reactive Hypoglycaemia.
    This sounds very similar to what happens to me.
    We have a forum on here that covers reactive hypoglycaemia, please read and see if anything on there is comparable.

    Best wishes
     
  6. EmilEmil

    EmilEmil · Member

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    Yep looks like you can have hiper and hypo glycemia all at once - the same as you can have hyper and insuline resistance. According to my doctor my sugar went quite high 150 level is quite high but after that very quickly went down (most probably I would have to test it again but I've already started to eat low-carb diet and glucose load tests are very stressful for organism).

    Could anyone said if my insuline level after 1h is ok?
    Looks like it's not easy to clearly state something about my results:)

    BTW I didn't find any similar post with test results interpretation. I also didn't find any norms related to insuline level after 1h load of glcose. My doctor said that insuline after 1h should be at most 5 times greater than insuline on empty stomach. Do you know if there are such information on this forum.site? It's really annoying that I can't find these norms;/
     
    #6 EmilEmil, Jun 20, 2019 at 9:10 PM
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2019
  7. kokhongw

    kokhongw I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Unfortunately your doctor did not provide you with an extended 3-4hr OGTT with insulin test. That would likely have provided a more complete picture of your current metabolic status.

    I think you are right at the borderline of high normal...

    Dr Joseph Kraft's glucose/insulin model gives a better picture of where we may be at...
    https://www.facebook.com/BurnFatNot...6160372874/532154686942353/?type=3&permPage=1
    upload_2019-6-21_11-14-29.png
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  8. EmilEmil

    EmilEmil · Member

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    @kokhongw Thanks for that - according to this book my insulin is normal...

    Now I'm even more confused:) So there is a chance that my insulin is ok, but in context to glucose level it's not?
     
  9. kokhongw

    kokhongw I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Yes, your insulin level seems within the normal range. If you had extended OGTT with insulin test, you would have been able to see how low your glucose dropped...we don't have enough data to tell...

    You may be more insulin sensitive than most of us or more sensitive to low glucose. Either way a generally lower carbs meal should be helpful to maintain a stable insulin/glucose response.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  10. Emile_the_rat

    Emile_the_rat Type 1.5 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi

    As mention above it is hard to tell without an prolonged OGTT. My advice is, get a glucose monitor at the pharmancy and check your blood sugar everytime you feel shaky, or bad, then it would be easier to catch if you really had a hypo.

    It is also possible to have both low and high blood sugar. I were first diagnosed with reactive hypoglycemia with a blood sugar of 42 mg/dl. But I also suffered with occasional blood sugar over 250 mh/dl.

    In the long run I turned out as an insulin dependent diabetic. But my point is, getting a blood sugar monitor to check your blood sugar at home, everytime you feel funny, is a good place to start.

    If you really have blood sugar issues a glucose monitor would definitely catch up on that. Good luck :)
     
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  11. EmilEmil

    EmilEmil · Member

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    I've checked my doctor fndings and you are right - I have reactive hypoglycemia - she said that it looks even from these test results cause my glucose level after 2h is lower than glucose on empty stomach. Looks like cutting carbs was good for me but I'm lost now - she said that I should eat more than 170g of protein every day - I've found that there is plenty of diet advises on the internet;/
     
  12. Emile_the_rat

    Emile_the_rat Type 1.5 · Well-Known Member

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    Not sure if it is a good adviced, but can tell what I did when I got diagnosed with RH (long story short: got RH a couple of years before I become diabetic).

    I just lived normal, I didn’t have to follow any diet or something. I just eated like I did before I got RH, and it wasn’t a problem as long as I always had some snack or soft drink with me in case of a hypo. And well, that worked fine, really.

    I understand that type 2 diabetics have to follow a diet, because high blood sugar can cause long-term complications. But RH won’t give you long-term complications like type 2 does. So therefore I think it is a little bit silly and exaggerated to get on a diet just because of RH.

    Having RH is not any worse than having to learn how to treat a hypo, so as long as you’re not having hypo unawareness it’s not dangerous for you, or a problem as long as you have a snack at hand.

    I found out that I didn’t get hypos as long as I did eat something with low GI every 3 hour. And were fine as long as I didn’t eat a to large amount of carbs on an empty stomach.

    And to be honest, I rather deal with a few hypos then following a strict diet every single day, that’s a whole lot more of work than treating just a little hypo.
     
  13. kitedoc

    kitedoc Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Could you please give the normal range for these readings, (glucose and insulin), those usually situated alongside the results you have given.
    That will make it easier to make sense of what you have posted. Many Thanks.
     
  14. kokhongw

    kokhongw I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    What may be helpful is to understand how insulin/glucose and ketones levels interplay to provide fuel for our brains and other major functions.

    Too much insulin (hyperinsulinemia) will result in low glucose AND ketones.

    But a normal level of insulin will allow a balance level of glucose AND ketones. We can see how this works out when a healthy individual fast for a number of days...glucose will drop and ketones increases, yet remain fully functional.


    [​IMG]


    So low glucose is not the cause of hypoglycemic events. It is low glucose in the absence of adequate ketones that is the real danger.

    This is the type of meals we want to avoid...because the glucose and insulin spikes subsequently leaves the brain in shock due to the energy shortfall.

    [​IMG]

    Dr Stephen Cunnane's presentation on brain metabolism may also be insightful...
     
  15. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    Even though I'm on a restrictive carb diet because of my intolerance to carbs, that is me. That is the way I've controlled my condition, that is how I've stopped having hypos. I repeat, I'm carb intolerant, my body cannot control the sudden change in high glucose from any form of carbs. And this triggers the overshoot of insulin, that is the cause of the hypos.
    We are all different with the same condition and depending on how much you are carb intolerant, the results, symptoms and blood sugar levels will be after carbs.
    You do have to find that balance of protein, fats and whatever carbs you can eat.
    I discovered long ago, that I'm a carnivore and protein from meat and the good saturated fats from meat are how I know what to eat and how much.
    I also have quite a good amount of above ground salad vegetables with my protein.

    The best advice from someone who has gone through the rollercoaster ride of RH is to keep testing and recording, gain the knowledge how food affects you, and avoid the carbs that trigger the symptoms. A very low carb diet is the best lifestyle choice.
    It has certainly worked for me!

    Best wishes
     
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