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Do you feel that diabetes has ruined your life ?

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by HICHAM_T2, Feb 14, 2018.

  1. Olufisayo

    Olufisayo Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I’ve come to accept it. Before I was diagnosed, my health deteriorated. I would have died of the ...pathy disease (can’t remember the correct term). Serious pains in my legs and other parts of my body. I used to be healthy and vivacious personality until I became stressed up with some problems. Today even with the diabetes, my health is back. I can now understand that diabetes is an expensive disease with self funding but I believe my creator will always be merciful with His blessings.
     
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  2. Livefree

    Livefree · Member

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    Hi Rachbox. Deviaying from the topic. I have lost alot of weight because of diabetes and i am struggling to gain weight. Any suggestions from the good people on the forum.
     
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  3. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    I’m not the one to ask really, I’m loosing weight (much needed). Maybe start your own thread? I’m sure you’ll get some help.
     
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  4. NewTD2

    NewTD2 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    When you said in your profile you reversed your T2. What’s your current HBA1C?

    Just curious to know that’s all mate.
     
  5. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    I agree that if I had been diagnosed as a child then my childhood would have been different as I would have been treated with exercise and more outdoor pursuits. I cried for a horse. We could afford it but it was discouraged due to risk of falling off, nervous wreck of a mother. I took lessons when I was older but never the same.
    I was encouraged to play indoors and never to adventure out. :( One child dying in childhood was enough for my mum and her family. Which I understand now but never did as a child.
    Diabetes type2 in childhood was unheard of in 1970s in England. Well by my 2 GPs at the time.

    I was lucky to have an unaffected childhood because of not being diagnosed. I haven't suffered from it other than obesity which is my only complication up until recently.
    On insulin til it can be reviewed after bariatric surgery. Hoping for a date this year for op.

    I think being diagnosed in childhood (6yr old and had symptoms) would have changed things. I may have got my horse after all or made my mum worse.
    No mum available and diabetes at 6yr old. I wouldn't fancy that. Even a horse couldn't have replaced my mum I adored.
     
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  6. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    Especially type2. Seen as a milder form of diabetes but complications creep up instead of aggressive effects like type1s effects.
    I think type1s have a turbulent time, even in childhood. It messes with everything. Mentally is can be a whirlwind.
    I can be as dangerous as cancer and as threatening as cancer for those with brittle diabetes.
     
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  7. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    How are you getting on?
     
  8. HICHAM_T2

    HICHAM_T2 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi
    How old were you when you were diagnosed with diabetes ? TYPE1 OR TYPE2
     
  9. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    Type2 at 31yrs old.
     
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  10. HICHAM_T2

    HICHAM_T2 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I also discovered that I had diabetes almost the same age
    Well I realized that it was not bad after I discovered this wonderful forum
     
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  11. jlarsson

    jlarsson Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I think the answer will vary depending on which type you are which in most cases will decide at which part of your life it impacts it. For a type 2, you're in most cases I believe gonna be settled in life, for the lack of a better phrase, and the change will mostly just be about how you take care of your body.
    If like me you're a type 1, typically diagnosed as a child or teenager, it will have a huge impact on how your life is shaped in terms of education and future careers etc, some of us may lose out on that career we definitely could've had had it not been for a condition that affects our ability to study or train or whatever it happens to be, or in my case delay getting there due to periods of depression and the whole feeling worthless and what's the point bit that affects you as a type 1.
    Of course there's also the factor of what you're doing for a living, if you're someone that works with your mind(i.e writers, engineers, doctors and so on) your life can be severely affected by it in ways that your body won't be, but if you're someone what works with your body as your tool you're not gonna be as negatively affected unless it impacts your vision or energy levels and things like that.

    As for me, my life definitely sucks more than it would have without it.
     
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  12. cribbo

    cribbo Type 2 · Member

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    First of all, I just want to say it's really sad to read all the replies to this thread of people who are struggling to cope with their condition and whose lives have been in some way damaged by it. My heart goes out to all of you and I hope you can find some way of alleviating the negative effects of diabetes on your life. I can say nothing more useful to you than that.

    That said, I'm one of the lucky ones. I still don't fully understand the effects and consequences of my diabetes, and I'm continuing to use this site to help, but I'm fairly confident in saying that being diagnosed with T2 diabetes has improved not only my life but my life expectancy. Before diagnosis about 9 months ago I was a walking heart attack. 6 stone overweight, no exercise, terrible diet etc etc. Now I'm still overweight but I've lost 4 stone (so far) and cycle up to 20 miles at a time and in training to hopefully do a coast to coast bike ride this summer (not in one go though, it'll take a few days - I might be diabetic, but I'm not mad). My diet has improved massively. I've just been on holiday where I went kayaking and played squash, racquetball, badminton and tennis with my son, which was a pure joy and something that would have been all but impossible this time last year.

    Without my diagnosis I have no doubt that I wouldn't have had the willpower (aka fear) to change my life as I have.

    For the relatively lucky people (I mean 'relatively' compared to some people who have replied to this thread - I don't mean to trivialise your problems in any way) in a similar position I would say you can definitely embrace diabetes and use it as the springboard you need to make a better you.

    Good luck and love to everyone.
     
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  13. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    Same here, at 31 years old, but type 1.
     
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  14. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    Hi, I can see it was a big wake up call for you, life changing in fact and well done for losing 4 stone in weight :)
     
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  15. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    How did you get told of your diagnosis? In hospital?
     
  16. zand

    zand Type 2 · Master

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    I had insulin resistance for maybe 20 years before I was diagnosed T2. Yes, I consider IR has ruined my life. I spent years desperately trying to lose weight.
     
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  17. Freema

    Freema Type 2 · Expert

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    No my life was ruined even before

    Well no I had a lot of mental conditions many years before , well most of my life since being a young teenager , I always cared of my health but didn’t have dicipline of exercising and staying slim , well when I was young I didn’t have to worry much but felt I was fat even when not being it, by and by my brain felt more and more like had it been microwaved ... always heavy and almost like a chronic influenza , luckily one phsychiatrist let me go very high in a medication I was given only for a short while in a very low dose and because I felt it helped so well I ended up taking more and more of it , but I stayed sedentary and got fatter and fatter and then I got the diagnosis , this medication can add to me having become diabetic most gain a lot of weight on it too , but I do take it again now but have learned to do regular exercise now and look at my food choices , I have a hard time keeping weight of anyway , today is my first day of under 30 grams of carbs , after initially losing 35 kg more than half the of it has crept on again, so this time I may be forced to do it the keto style....

    Actually diabetes has made me do something actively and steadily for my health and apparently I need kind of a gun pointing at me to get started and stay focused

    This last year and a half in this forum I have learned more of food and metabolism than in all the rest of my life , thanks to all of you in here sharing , now need to be better at implementing , no it has not ruined my life it has challenged me in very fine ways too , wish all GP’s were forced to learn what people in here knows that would change human health
     
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    #97 Freema, Apr 21, 2018 at 4:48 PM
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2018
  18. Scott-C

    Scott-C Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Go for it, mate! I used to do a lot of cycle touring with a tent on the back of the bike when I was younger.

    One of the sweetest was a coast to coast along the Great Glen Cycle Route from Fort William on the west coast of Scotland to Inverness on the east.

    Not a long trip by any means, only about 80 miles, but there was so much crammed into those 80. It follows canal paths up from Fort William, spills out into Loch Ness at Fort Augustus, managed to rick my knee on the way there, so laid up at FA for a few days, watching yachts traversing through the middle of Scotland whilst sitting in a decent pub, then a stint on the high ground above Loch Ness, didn't spot the monster, then through some leafy glades and forests on the run into Inverness.

    Like I say, just 80 miles, but it was a good 80 miles!
     
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  19. HICHAM_T2

    HICHAM_T2 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    For me I'm forced your brother is not a hero
     
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  20. PenguinMum

    PenguinMum Type 2 · Expert

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    I think I could have really struggled to accept my diagnosis and know what to do about it without this forum. The inspirational and kind people who have informed and supported my worries have done more - and continue to do - for me than I could ever have expected.
     
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