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Do you people get all your diabetes stuff for nothing?

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by TheBigNewt, Apr 12, 2017.

  1. TheBigNewt

    TheBigNewt Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Insulins, syringes, needles, test strips, pumps, CGMs? Because I sure don't, and I have medical insurance, which I couldn't even buy until I went to work for the government. I pay for my own test strips (which are only about 15 cents online). A 10 ml bottle of Lantus costs me $120, and a box of 5 Novorapid pens costs me $230.
     
  2. Jamesuk9

    Jamesuk9 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Only in America!

    God bless the NHS, all prescription medication is free at point of use to anyone living in Wales or Scotland and free to anyone on low income in England and £29.10 every 3 months for those in England who are deemed able to afford to pay.
     
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  3. DunePlodder

    DunePlodder Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Not many people have pumps & very few people get CGMs paid for.
     
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  4. TheBigNewt

    TheBigNewt Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Sorry, it's not considered insulting language here. So how much in taxes do they take out for health insurance? Here they take out 6% of your pay check for Social Security, and 4% for Medicare, both are programs for seniors. And the employer has to match that 10%. I'm guessing NSH eats up some serious tax dollars over there because it includes everybody, and everybody (kids) doesn't work.
     
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  5. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    Maybe your new president could come up trumps with a new medical system, or try Mexico it's cheaper, about half the price of the USA.
     
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  6. serenity648

    serenity648 · Guest

    I know my friend, with a T1 husband and two T1 adult sons, all on pumps, have to mainly self fund their pump stuff. I dont know the details. And they are all tax payers too.
     
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  7. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/article/10078062/why-do-we-pay-national-insurance
     
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  8. Johnjoe13

    Johnjoe13 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm in England and do not pay for anything on prescription since I was put on Metformin, the nurse that put me on it told me that once you are medicated for T2 you can receive a medical exemption certificate. The only thing they do not provide on prescription is a meter and test strips which I have to buy myself. To be honest I'll quite happily pop a small amount of metformin as long as I can, before this I had to pay for the statin and two types of other medication i'm on so it's proved a money saver for me
     
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  9. TheBigNewt

    TheBigNewt Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks. So you basically pay 12%, which is quite a bit. Here my employer (US gvt.) pays the lion's share of my insurance premium (about 75%) and that benefit is not taxed. I pay $230/month for the 2 of us, with a $700 deductible and copays. So it's a tiny portion of what I made. 12% would be a lot of money.
     
  10. covknit

    covknit Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    and how much tax do you pay? We have to pay tax, Ni, pension contributions etc , Employees have it deducted from our wages. The self employed pay less NI but are entotled to fewer benefits if thing go pear shaped. On top of that we pay VAT of 20% on most items. The main exemt item is basic foodstuffs. Then we have duties, levies, duties on top. Plus we have far fewer allowable deductions than in the US http://www.uktaxcalculators.co.uk/
     
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  11. Jordi77

    Jordi77 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm on insulin and T2 and I get a exception cetificate and I get everything free except the meter but I get the test strips free and everything else and the test strips are £26 for 50 and I get them for free and I don't get no arguments from the doctors or nurses as they are happy to send the prescription for them to the chemist and I just pick it up and go home and I place a order every two to three weeks for them
     
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  12. TheBigNewt

    TheBigNewt Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Like I said we get 10% taken out of our pay for combined Social Security (a pension of sorts) and Medicare (senior healthcare age 65). As for your VAT our total sales tax is about 8.5% in most states (excludes food like you). The Social Security tax stops on income over about $100,000. The Medicare tax has no cap.
     
  13. TheBigNewt

    TheBigNewt Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Yes medical care is ridiculously expensive here compared to other nations. And Obamacare did nothing to change that. I'm all for having "Medicare for all". Medicare limits costs better than private insurance companies. We'd probably only have to pay another 2% tax on income to have that. Just a guess.
     
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  14. covknit

    covknit Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    compared to our 20% income tax (40% above £42,000ish) plus 12% National insurance plus prescription charges plus optional private medical plus VAT 20%. Prescription charge rate only applies to items the GP is willing to write a prescription for. A lot of us have to buy our own meters and ancilliaries.
     
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  15. AndBreathe

    AndBreathe I reversed my Type 2 · Expert
    Retired Moderator

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    People in England, diagnosed as diabetic, who take medication for their Diabetes are entitled to apply for a prescription charge exemption form. Anyone, like myself, who was diagnosed with diabetes, but has never taken medication, is not entitled to a prescription charge exemption.

    People entitled to an exemption are only exempt from paying for items on their NHS prescription, so not necessarily all the items you list. Most T2s are not prescribed tests trips, for example, and few T1s have CGM provided on prescription.
     
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  16. Diakat

    Diakat Type 1 · Moderator
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    And there are many who seem to have no healthcare. American (and Canadian) patients have been on here saying they cannot afford insulin.

    The NHS is far from perfect but mostly comes through.
     
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  17. Winnie53

    Winnie53 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    My experience with US health care is that for the "underemployed", it's expensive. Now in my mid-50's, I work 20 hours a week so have to buy my health insurance at a cost of $550/month. In addition, not much is covered until I reach my $6,000/year deductible. Don't know what my prescription benefit is (because I don't take any medications). I pay for my own glucose test strips, which cost me 18 cents each. My goal is to eventually find a full-time job with benefits, but that's at least a year or two away.

    Once I reach age 65, my health care will be much less. Counting down the years... :)
     
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  18. CathP

    CathP Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    The NHS have just started funding my 6 year old daughters dexcom, after a year of self-funding. The NHS has its faults, but on the whole it's amazing.
     
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  19. covknit

    covknit Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    The fact that everyone whose earnings exceed a certain figure contribute to a shared pot is the reason why the NHS was so effective. When we need medical help the NHS is there and when we are earning we pay our share into into the pot. When my American sister in law died her family had to hand in the keys of the house to satisfy the medical bills.
     
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  20. TheBigNewt

    TheBigNewt Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Yeah I know. I couldn't get medical insurance because I was self employed and have diabetes. I bought a catastrophic plan with a $20,000 deductible for $150/month. So I paid full boat for insulin. For awhile I could get it half price from Canada though which was nice because I just write my own prescriptions. Obama made the Canada thing illegal. I figure I saved $100,000 during the time I was self employed not buying expensive health insurance (which I didn't ever need). And the money I put aside for the deductible went up by 50%!
     
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    #20 TheBigNewt, Apr 12, 2017 at 9:30 PM
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2017
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