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Do you people get all your diabetes stuff for nothing?

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by TheBigNewt, Apr 12, 2017.

  1. zand

    zand Type 2 · Expert

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    I agree, and I am happy to contribute because I can. :) But then there are plenty of people who are exempt from paying for prescriptions who could too.
     
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  2. TheBigNewt

    TheBigNewt Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    My insurance doesn't cover test strips. I buy them online for $15 per 100 like people in the UK. Cheap. A week's worth costs the same as a Starbucks.
     
  3. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    That is cheap for 100 strips.
     
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  4. DiabeticDadUK

    DiabeticDadUK Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I can't answer your first question. That's only what I've read from social media - of course that doesn't make it true, numbers I've seen range from $300 - $900+change (up to $1000 , then). Numbers are often accompanied by comments direct to the insulin manufacturers for increasing their prices. Less than friendly, obviously. So I guess that is factual and insulin prices have increased dramatically?

    What works for America, works for America. If people are falling seriously ill or dying because they cannot afford insulin then perhaps it's not the best system. In the UK, if you need insulin, you get insulin. In the correct amounts too, to ensure you don't "stretch out" doses and endanger your life. Prince or pauper, the NHS treats you the same.
     
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  5. TheBigNewt

    TheBigNewt Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Actually it's $20 per 100. I buy 600 at a time, a dozen vials of 50, for $120 free ship no tax. Big website for diabetic supplies. You get a bunch of free lancets with your order, or a new meter, etc.
     
  6. Jamesuk9

    Jamesuk9 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    The whole of Wales, Scotland and NI is exempt from paying for prescriptions, regardless of income.

    Middle England keeps voting the Tories in, blame them.
     
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  7. zand

    zand Type 2 · Expert

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    Personally I think England has it right. There's people in Wales refused cancer treatment which is available in England. I think wherever you live in the UK if you can afford the prescription charge you should pay it. I don't agree that those who can pay should have them for free.
     
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    #47 zand, Apr 13, 2017 at 7:42 PM
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2017
  8. JoeCo

    JoeCo Type 1 · Member

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    If you don't mind me asking does your insurer offer insulin pumps and if so what are their requirements, e.g. do they ask for a certain A1c level? One of the advantages of the U.S. system, at least for those who are insured, is that things like insulin pumps appear to be much easier to access. I was recently diagnosed type 1 last August, have family on both sides of the Atlantic, and this ended up becoming a huge debate in my family. Based on my current experience with the NHS I'm learning towards believing the U.S. system is better for those of us in a position to access good employer provided insurance.
     
  9. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    But what about those who don't have that @JoeCo Or have a good job/insurance and lose it?

    I prefer health care based on need not ability to pay.

    Can I ask what your problems have been getting a pump?
     
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  10. JoeCo

    JoeCo Type 1 · Member

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    I'm from Canada but I currently live in the UK (dual citizen). In Canada insulin is not covered by the single payer so I would require U.S. style private insurance from an employer if/when I return there. Therefore, I'd like to know what TheBigNewt's experience is in that regard. Health care systems are different in different countries, it's a matter of personal opinion/ideology/experience. I'm simply looking at what my options are for my own health in light of a relatively new diagnosis (August 2016). Hope you understand :)
     
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  11. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    @JoeCo Yes, I do understand :) I was just wondering if you'd tried and failed to get a pump on the NHS, and, if so, what the reason for refusing you was (assuming you're being treated like a UK citizen as regards health while you're in the UK).
     
  12. JoeCo

    JoeCo Type 1 · Member

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    I haven't applied for an insulin pump so I have no personal experience in that area; I've simply read and heard it's more difficult to get one here compared to other European countries or under employer provided insurance in countries where that is used for insulin access. I may be wrong, I'd have to apply to find out for myself, but I confess to being skeptical and even wary of going to the effort based on my experience with the NHS and type 1 diabetes so far. I'm sure it's better in other parts of the country but my experience in London has unfortunately been bad.
     
  13. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    Still cheap in comparison to the UK, there is a meter available here where the test strips sell for around £7 for a box of 50, but to buy most brand of test strips your talking in the range of £15-£30.

    Lancets are available on prescription for people like myself who are type 1, regards to the bg meters, most companies are more than happy to give them away for free (to those who test multiple times a day) as they reap the rewards in the sale of the test strips. I've only ever bought one bg meter and that was my very first, it was 30+ years ago now.
     
  14. TheBigNewt

    TheBigNewt Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Really? Insulin is not covered by your national insurance/single payer? If you have to pay for it out of pocket at least it's way cheaper than it would be here if you didn't have insurance. I bet a 10cc bottle of Lantus would cost $250 if you had no insurance. It costs me $120 and I do have insurance. I got switched to Basaglar which only comes in pens (more expensive delivery system) so I was gonna pay more for the same amount. But I figured out if my prescription was 40U/d instead of 25U/d I'd hit the max for a 3 month prescription which is $500. So I did that and it will last 6 months if I still take 25U/d. Nice I can write my own rx.
     
  15. lukkymik

    lukkymik Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Can you define "if you can afford" please as between us my wife and I have 26 items on repeat prescription every month approx £214 per month. "A" can no longer work due to her deteriorating health BUT I apparently earn too much to qualify for any PIP/carers allowance etc etc etc. My take home is around £1400 a month. Thank gid for the NHS as we'd both have been dead long ago. Please think before making sweeping statements.
     
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  16. serenity648

    serenity648 · Guest

    Well, obviously you cant afford it, so @zand wasnt referring to you.
     
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  17. JoeCo

    JoeCo Type 1 · Member

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    Yeah, I was surprised as well, but in Canada they simply don't cover it even for type 1 unless you're on welfare or over 65. My only option is to have it covered by employer top up insurance or pay out of pocket. I figured at least the benefit is insurance might throw in an insulin pump, but I guess it depends on the company. Glad you've found a smart rx plan!
     
  18. TorqPenderloin

    TorqPenderloin Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I've said it plenty of times and I'll say it again...you can get a vial of insulin here in the USA for under $50. As mentioned, test strips can be had for very cheap as well.

    Now, you're not going to get the best and most innovative medications and technology available but you will get something that works perfectly fine and has kept people alive for decades.

    Nothing is free and the NHS exists as a result of much higher taxes compared to the USA.

    Unfortunately, all the US has to do is set a price cap on how much pharmaceutical countries can charge in the USA versus other countries and it would further burden an already burdened system (NHS). The USA accounts for around 45% of the worlds pharmaceutical sales.

    I'm not saying that we (US) has it figured out. In fact, quite the contrary. What I'm saying is that each system has its own flaws and there are a lot of misconceptions.

    This is a very touchy subject because it's not a normal industry, and I realize we are talking about people's lives here. It's an unfortunate situation but again the fact of the matter is that nothing is "free."
     
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  19. lovinglife

    lovinglife Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    PIP isn't affected by how much you earn, have as savings etc - it's not income based so anyone no matter what they earn can claim it and receive it if they qualify. Carers Allowance isn't either but it is capped - if you fit the criteria you can earn £116 a week before it's affected.

    If you've been turned down for PIP solely on your financial situation you can challenge that and appeal as it's certainly not correct
     
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