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Don't forget the proteins

Discussion in 'Low-carb Diet Forum' started by hanadr, Jan 28, 2010.

  1. graham64

    graham64 · Well-Known Member

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  2. cugila

    cugila · Master

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    I certainly don't recognise most of the names you quoted, I'm not a Food Chemist, however having previously had to know and deal with hazardous substances, it is only when these substances are in their initial form and concentrated that they are toxic. When diluted to the correct amount as in Food use, they are not toxic, they are very useful chemicals.

    You would be hard pressed to avoid ANY of them in any diet.

    Then there is Ascorbyl palmitate which is on your list. This is an ester formed from ascorbic acid and palmitic acid creating a fat-soluble form of vitamin C. In addition to its use as a source of vitamin C, it is also used as an antioxidant food additive (E number E304).

    I was what is called a Hazchem Officer and have knowledge of the Hazchem codes and data as to the protective gear to be used when transported on the roads in particular. That information is not relevant when it is processed at a factory for food use.

    A tanker load of Vinegar carries a Hazchem mark when it is transported, just the same as something like petrol. However I seem to recall you advocate the use of Vinegar, is that one of your toxic substances as well ?

    For instance Tert-Butylhydroquinone (TBHQ, tertiary butylhydroquinone) is an aromatic organic compound which is a type of phenol. It is a derivative of hydroquinone, substituted with tert-butyl group.

    Applications
    TBHQ is a highly effective preservative for unsaturated vegetable oils and many edible animal fats. It does not cause discoloration even in the presence of iron, and does not change flavor or odor of the material to which it is added. It can be combined with other preservatives such as butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA). As a food additive, its E number is E319, where it is used as a preservative. It is added to a wide range of foods, with the highest limit (1000 mg/kg) permitted for frozen fish and fish products. Something I am sure most low carbers would eat a lot of as Fish is an ideal low carb food.

    Got any other toxic chemicals.....we can go through them all if you like....... :wink:
     
  3. graham64

    graham64 · Well-Known Member

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    Wow that looks even more scary :shock: but thanks for the warning about frozen fish I do try to keep to fresh produce but occasionaly do use frozen.

    Goodnight
    Graham
     

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  4. cugila

    cugila · Master

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    Glad to be of help......wouldn't want you to eat anything toxic now, would we....... :D
     
  5. hanadr

    hanadr · Expert

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    Viamins A & D ARE toxic in excess, being fat soluble, they are not easily disposed of through the kidneys.
    Do you know thw old warning to Arctic explorers? That if you shoot a polar bear for food, you musn't eat the liver. It's got toxic levels of vitamin A.
    Hana
     
  6. cugila

    cugila · Master

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    ANYTHING to excess can be Toxic, however we are talking about normal levels, not excessive levels.

    As for the Polar Bears.....well I have never been further North than Ayrshire....you don't see many up there so I won't exactly lose much sleep over it........I'll let you know if I plan to move to the North Pole shall I ? You can advise me further. It's so good to have such advice from experts. :D
     
  7. catherinecherub

    catherinecherub · Guest

    :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
    Haven't seen anyone offering polar bear liver locally. Will keep an eye out.
     
  8. cugila

    cugila · Master

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    Humans only require Vit A it in very small amounts, but it plays a vital role in eyesight, reproduction, fetal development, growth, immune response and the cellular formation of tissue.

    We typically absorb it through the consumption of foods such as spinach, broccoli, eggs, milk and various meats.

    Without enough vitamin A in your system, you could easily find yourself facing symptoms just as bad as those associated with hypervitaminosis A (from the infamous Polar Bear Liver).

    Deficiencies can lead to dry skin, diarrhea, blindness, growth retardation and even death.

    As for Vit D......Yes it can be Toxic if in excess......the Food Standards Agency states that taking 25µg (1,000 IU) of vitamin D supplements daily is unlikely to cause any harm in the general population.

    pregnancy
    excess vitamin D in animals has been shown to have teratogenic effects. High systemic doses of vitamin D should be avoided during pregnancy.

    in consideration of all these factors in mind, the currently recommended dose for supplementation during pregnancy and breast-feeding (10µg [400 IU] daily) seems reasonable.
     
  9. catherinecherub

    catherinecherub · Guest

    I always wonder why people are adding supplements to their diet if all these are available through healthy eating. I can understand it if you are showing signs of vitamin deficiency and your Dr. has advised and prescribed supplementation. I know that some illness require this too. It is not something that should be done lightly and research needs to be done before embarking on this journey.

    You can overdose on any vitamin if you take it long enough and in high enough doses as this article explains,

    http://www.livestrong.com/article/22298 ... -symptoms/
     
  10. phoenix

    phoenix Type 1 · Expert

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    Even experts aren't always sensible, but perhaps that sometimes helps them make new discoveries,

    Talking of polar bears reminded me of this story about Dr Hugh SInclair, a rather eccentric academic who pioneered work on fatty acids and vitamins.

    Two visiting cardiovascular experts stayed at his house for an Oxford meeting.
    At breakfast next morning they noticed, 'he had some filthy stuff that he was drinking, which he said was tea. Well, it wasn’t tea, it was seal oil. The kitchen, because Hugh lived alone, was filthy( I'm quoting here)) and the female researcher, Elspeth, ' having inspected it, demanded to know what was in the fridge. Hugh was forced,very reluctantly, to find a key. Having spotted an ice pick hanging by the side of the fridge, Elspeth and Hugh opened it and inside was a frozen seal, at which he had been picking away.'
    A bit odd, but he was a known eccentric and maybe he was trying to prove something about the benefits of seal oil.
    But the story doesn't end there. A few months later Dr Sinclair was supposed to have a liver biopsy, his doctor tested his bleeding time and found it to be 60 minutes. He phoned his cardiovascular friend. 'What did he think?'
    ‘Well, you do what you like, Hugh, but it will be the last time you will be talking to me, or anybody else for that matter.’

    Seal meat is a rich source of omega 3 fatty acids and we now know that one of the effects of an overdose of omega 3 is to increase bleeding time. Normal bleeding times are apparently between 2 and 9 minutes .

    He didn’t have the biopsy. We aren't told whether or not he gave up eating seal.

    So on your next trip to the artic remember to avoid the polar bear liver and not to eat too much seal
    :lol:
    story taken from Wellcome Trust witness seminar on the history of cholesterol and cardiovascular research in the UK 1950–2000
     
  11. Doczoc

    Doczoc · Well-Known Member

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    Personally I think most oils or fats that haven't been processed are good fats. And for most people following a low carb diet, their inclusion isn't a problem. If you have a reaction to fats then of course it's difficult to include and you can only do what you can do. As for low fat hydrogenated spreads, I'd rather go without - having said that I don't do toast so it's not a big deal. I'm eating more fat than at any time in my life and my bloods are in the best shape of my life. So despite conventional wisdom I'll keep on eating the cheese, butter, and cream. It's been my life saver!
     
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