1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2021 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Don't want to drive ?

Discussion in 'Driving and DVLA' started by flicc90, Apr 9, 2013.

  1. flicc90

    flicc90 Type 1 · Member

    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    With all these new rules and regulations about driving I know it makes me feel like I don't want to learn how to drive any more.
    When I was younger all I wanted to do was learn how to drive so I could become more independent.
    Now being put off with it all I have to relay on my parents to take me anywhere as where I live I have no public transport and taxis cost you an arm and a leg.

    I know the rule changes are to keep people safe and I understand that,
    I want to know what other people views are on this ?

    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
  2. hale710

    hale710 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,903
    Likes Received:
    1,082
    Trophy Points:
    178
    I passed my test 5 years before I was diagnosed. I now choose not to drive a lot of the time though. As often as possible my boyfriend drives us. This is purely because I'd constantly be testing so I could get behind the wheel. If I'm sitting at a 4.6mmol/l I don't WANT to eat so I can legally drive, so he drives for me
     
  3. izzzi

    izzzi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,207
    Likes Received:
    2,400
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Hi, Flicc90, :)

    I would go for a provisional driving licence, and try a few lessons just to find out what it is like.
    You might find a great expense at first,
    Where you live etc; is a good enough reason for you to get started. at the end of the day it is insurance that cost money.

    Best of luck. ( you will be glad in the long run if you get started)

    Roy. :)
     
  4. hale710

    hale710 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,903
    Likes Received:
    1,082
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Insurance doesn't have to be expensive. Mine certainly isn't going to bankrupt anyone. Sensible car helps, don't try to have something with a massive engine. I had a 1L corsa for the first 4 years, only just upgraded myself to a 1.2!

    I would definitely try it. I wouldnt manage without my license, I just choose not to drive when I can avoid it.
     
  5. martwolves

    martwolves Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    625
    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    38
    I've been driving 18 years and last year decided sod it, with all these tests every time you go in the acr and sending your licence off. I now use public transport, Wolverhampton to Birmingham for £1,000 per year. I can use Bus/Metro and trains. I get a bus to the train station and a train to work and vice versa on the return journey.
    It's much cheaper as work pay for 75% of my ticket and I don't pay to park, get snarled up on the M6 every morning and can relax with a nice brew and read a book/newspaper. My pass is valid on all public buses trains and trams throughout the west midlands so it's ideal. I gave me car to my daughter when she passed her test last year, so she's chuffed and sometimes gives me a lift if I want one, plus my wife drives too, so there's no need for me to drive at all these days. No stress and can chill out travelling to and from work. No more 7:00am road rage that puts you in a bad mood all day. I must say the services are very frequent so all in all I'm much happier. If I really need to I am at work as soon as I'm on the train with Blackberry and laptop.
    But that only works as we have a very good travel network.
    All the best
    Mart
     
  6. Lucypieee

    Lucypieee · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    227
    Likes Received:
    9
    Trophy Points:
    38
    I decided that I wasn't going to learn to drive before I turned 17, fortunately, I live in an outer London borough and public transport is cheap and frequent.

    I still got my provisional licence because it was a one-off cost and meant I had another form of ID.

    I learnt to drive when I was 22, it took about 6 months and I had 2 tests. No one but my boyfriend and my immediate family knew I was learning, that way I was doing it just for me. I passed just over a year ago, I have driven a car 3 times since, but, I've passed the test, it's over and done with.

    The main reason I had to learn was because my boyfriend lives 35 miles away in an area with no train station and limited buses and I hated relying on him to pick me up just to go to his, it's not fair on him. Whilst I don't have a car, I can now drive when I need to (providing I'm insured) and it's nice to have that freedom.

    The good thing about having that kind of freedom and independence is that you can choose when you want to use it.


    Sent from Diabetes.co.uk Forum App
     
  7. martwolves

    martwolves Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    625
    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    38
    I packed in driving and just use public transport, bus, train or metro. Much more relaxing, read a book over the hour it takes me to get into Birmingham. Unless the trains are delayed by the company I work for :p
     
  8. Chris_tim

    Chris_tim · Member

    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    I passed my test before I found out I was type 1, I carried on driving for a few years but as I had quite a powerful car due to previously cheap insurance I started to find with rising fuel costs I lost interest in driving. I still like driving but after taking up cycling again as a means of fitness I decided to sell the car and buy a better bike with the money, never looked back! I have some understanding friends that are more than happy to let me borrow their car if I really need one for anything but no I find you can get by no bother without one. I live in a very rural area of sussex with poor/overpriced public transport, I'll commute by bike anywhere that is inside 20 miles and any further I ride to the nearest trains station which is only 3 miles.

    Last year I was doing a 25 mile a day round trip to uni by bike rain or shine plus any training I did afterwards and at the weekends, you can go a lot further than you think on a bike when you build up to it. I'd recommend learning to drive and getting your license so you can drive should you ever need to, having a car and driving isn't everything though.
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook