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Exercise

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by nomorechoccy, Sep 4, 2018.

  1. SaladDaze

    SaladDaze Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  2. Alexandra100

    Alexandra100 Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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  3. SaladDaze

    SaladDaze Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    That definitely makes sense to me. If you can control bs to normal levels then presumably, glycation doesn't kick in. But just in case, I think exercise to keep supple and maintain muscle sounds like good policy.
     
  4. SaladDaze

    SaladDaze Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    For me the, almost overnight, wrinkling of my hands was one of the most noticeable and worrying symptoms that caused me to go to the doctor's for diagnosis. I presume that was down to collagen glycation.
     
  5. Alexandra100

    Alexandra100 Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    Indeed. Dr Bernstein says that he suffered from two shoulders which became frozen before he found out that he needed to lower his bg, and how to do it. He says that whereas many diabetic complications can be reversed by maintaining normal bgs, problems like frozen shoulder, once acquired, also require physiotherapy to heal them. So to me careful LC diet plus prophylactic exercises make sense.
     
  6. hankyman

    hankyman · Newbie

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    Hi new to this forum can you explain please why hard surfaces are not good?
     
  7. There is no Spoon

    There is no Spoon I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Isn't that what they used to call Smurfette behind her back. :cool:
    :bag:
     
  8. kitedoc

    kitedoc Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you @Alexandra100, but the study does not compare health and joint outcomes for running vs walking.
    And how was any cartilage damage assessed as Xrays may not show this, any perhaps MRIs and arthroscopy?
    And what is meant by longterm?
    I appreciate that sports like football show up joint injuries due to trauma.
     
  9. kitedoc

    kitedoc Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Think what effect handling a jack hammer has on one's hands, arms and neck. Reduce the vibration factor but multiply it by the number of miles run on hard surfaces and the effect on most body joints. If one has peripheral neuropathy there is risk of joint and skin injury when running on hard surfaces, also for skin if there are circulation problems in the feet,
    Also the increase in blood pressure caused by running (whatever the surface) may conceivably cause rupture of eye blood vessels in some with diabetic retinopathy.
     
  10. nomorechoccy

    nomorechoccy · Active Member

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    Better night sleep wise last night didn't wake until after 5 just had a coffee and going for a longer walk..

    One advantage about going out early is little noise in the park.

    I like to talk to people when I am out as I have very few friends and get quite lonely.
     
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  11. nomorechoccy

    nomorechoccy · Active Member

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    Just got back 3.5 miles under my belt and sun is coming out.
     
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  12. KK123

    KK123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I like to run and exercise as many others do and I don't do it specifically to tackle diabetes. Of course diet seems to be the primary way to tackle glucose levels but I also want to keep my bones strong, my heart strong and all those other things pertaining to a strong and physically healthy body. No matter what our health conditions, exercise has SURELY got to be beneficial to the vast majority of us, whether it is a gentle walk or a marathon or light weights or swimming. I want low glucose levels of course but I also want to be as fit as possible as I too, hurtle towards 60!
     
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  13. Alexandra100

    Alexandra100 Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    I totally agree with every word, but I am also aware that this must be painful reading for those of us who are too infirm to exercise. Maybe equivalent to the dismay I feel when I read about others on the Forum who are able to eat far more carbs than me yet get better bg results!
     
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  14. Alexandra100

    Alexandra100 Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    Running on hard surfaces increases the impact, which is already considerable. It also usually involves the same foot strike step after step. Running on grass or trails not only reduces the impact but also varies the footstrike. However, in recent years ultra cushioned shoes have become available, which probably reduce the harmful impact of running on roads. And on the other hand research has shown that some impact is actually good for our joints! Tarmac is considered to be less harmful than concrete or stone, so where possible it is said to be better to run in the road rather than on the pavement.
     
  15. LittleGreyCat

    LittleGreyCat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Why is this in any way special to running?

    I assume that you are saying that any vigorous exercise can result in raised blood pressure which can conceivably damage blood vessels in the eye if you already have DR.
    A sensible warning, but it should not discourage the vast majority of diabetics from running.

    See https://www.blindalive.com/blind-alive-blog/2017/4/16/how-to-exercise-with-diabetic-retinopathy for an example of advice.

    On the subject of hard surfaces, I assume that running on a treadmill in the gym is an acceptable alternative if you are worried about your feet.
     
  16. kitedoc

    kitedoc Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I see it as a matter of degree. Pounding pavement is more jarring than walking it.
     
  17. Alexandra100

    Alexandra100 Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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  18. kitedoc

    kitedoc Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you @Alexandra100, interesting article. I am putting my pedant hat on and asking when does slow running become fast walking and visa versa? Each to his/her own I think.
     
  19. SaladDaze

    SaladDaze Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I've lost 20% of body weight since I last mentioned running to my doc. That was before my diabetes diagnosis. He did not recommend it. Next time I see him I'll ask him whether, now I'm well within normal body weight, he's less dismissive of the idea of me running. I'm lucky enough to have a long beach 200 metres from home and I have visions (rose tinted perhaps) of running along it early in the morning.
     
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  20. Alexandra100

    Alexandra100 Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    To be considered as running both feet have to be off the ground at least momentarily - hence the increased impact. When walking there is always at least part of one foot on the ground. Race walking rules are very strict abut this.
    From Wikepedia:
    "There are two rules that govern racewalking.[4][5] The first dictates that the athlete's back toe cannot leave the ground until the heel of the front foot has touched. Violation of this rule is known as loss of contact. The second rule requires that the supporting leg must straighten from the point of contact with the ground and remain straightened until the body passes directly over it. These rules are judged by the unaided human eye. Athletes regularly lose contact for a few milliseconds per stride, which can be caught on film, but such a short flight phase is said to be undetectable to the human eye.[citation needed]

    Athletes stay low to the ground by keeping their arms pumping low, close to their hips. If one sees a racewalker's shoulders rising, it may be a sign that the athlete is losing contact with the ground. What appears to be an exaggerated swivel to the hip is, in fact, a full rotation of the pelvis. Athletes aim to move the pelvis forward, and to minimize sideways motion in order to achieve maximum forward propulsion. Speed is achieved by stepping quickly with the aim of rapid turnover. This minimizes the risk of the feet leaving the ground. Strides are short and quick, with pushoff coming forward from the ball of the foot, again to minimize the risk of losing contact with the ground. World-class racewalkers (male and female) can average under four and five minutes per kilometre in a 20-km racewalk."

    @kitedoc maybe this is the sport for you?
     
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