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Facebook rant

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by carol43, Sep 27, 2015.

  1. carol43

    carol43 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    I have this site on my Facebook page. Reading the comments after a posting I cannot believe the comments people make. Why would people eat proper chocolate and say I'll just increase my insulin to cover it. Do they not realise what they are doing to themselves. Why would people comment on Facebook about diabetes but obviously never go to this site. I've just told someone who posted recently diagnosed T2 to go to the website.
     
  2. graj0

    graj0 · Guest

    It's like they say "There's nowt so queer as folk". All we can do is suggest a better way and then it's up to them. I'm going to make sure that I'll do what I can to make my condition easier to live with and without relying on medication unless it's obviously necessary. Can't do anything more really.
     
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  3. Southbeds

    Southbeds Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I am also on that Facebook site,seems mostly young people who don't have a clue about the conseqences of the actions and not prepareing themselfes for the future,just expecting something to turn up
     
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  4. tigerlily72

    tigerlily72 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm a Facebooker and I have also "liked" this site on Facebook. BUT, I get my info and advice directly from on here rather than via Facebook.

    It's all about educating yourself and wanting to do something about it to change it! At least you've signposted and pointed them to this site :)
     
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  5. ohitsnicola

    ohitsnicola Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I am presuming you are referring to type 2's In regards to the chocolate? And what do you mean by chocolate??
     
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  6. phoenix

    phoenix Type 1 · Expert

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    Are they necessarily doing anything wrong?
    The thread is about using diabetic chocolate ( not touching the stuff seems to be the universal answer, a sentiment I heartily agree with)
    It's not good for anyone to eat lots of chocolate or sweets diabetic or not. It is though perfectly possible for someone with type one to have some and use insulin to cover it, just as they use insulin when they eat lots of other things.
    The people saying that they would increase the insulin may well be type ones, certainly some actually say that they are or mention DAFNE . At least a couple are parents of children with type ones. It's one of the problems that it isn't always clear on facebook
    There are lots of people of both types on this forum that eat a little dark chocolate on a fairly regular basis. If I eat that then I would still have to take it into account when calculating the insulin dose.

    .
     
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  7. urbanracer

    urbanracer Type 1 · Expert
    Retired Moderator

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    Forgetting chocolate for a moment, I know 2 people in the real world who eat as much of whatever they want. They both vary thier insulin to match the carbs. If they can keep thier BG under control then good luck to them. We all have to find our own way, of dealing with things.
     
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  8. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    I lnow a real world diet only diabetic that continues to have a sugar in hot drinks. I just have to accept ignorance nowadays. Some people win't change and its wasted emotion, speech and thoughts from me.. So just stay quiet...
     
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  9. Rob2006Scott

    Rob2006Scott Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Yet another reason for me to avoid Facebook. Think I'll stick to this forum (and Twitter). Good advice and plenty of opinions to go round on here.
     
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  10. Cl1ve

    Cl1ve Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi . Good comment . I'm a type2 put it must be really hard to have to inject yourself all the time and a little treat now and then . Can it be such a bad thing . As you say they have to work out how much insulin to use so why not now and again . Some times it's the little things that make us happy
    Clive
     
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  11. Robbity

    Robbity Type 2 · Expert

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    I think we have to accept that if we're type 2 diabetics on medications and diet, we may need to be more careful, and may be much more limited in what we can (or should!) eat, than those diabetics who have to take insulin. Our relationship with it isn't the same: diabetics needing insulin can't make what they require, so by adjusting their doses to match what they eat they are only doing for their bodies what their bodies are not able to do naturally. So it's not necessarily wrong to do this, though possibly it may not always be the best way to handle things, but they shouldn't have to deny themselves some treats because their bodies can't function as they should.

    Robbity
     
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  12. Emmotha

    Emmotha Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I feel I shouldn't reply to this, but I will anyway :)

    Why would people eat normal chocolate and inject for it? Because chocolate is nice, and if you can control your ratios and eat it as part of a balanced diet, then why not? I am, of course speaking as a T1 and it's not nice to be judged for wanting to eat a treat
     
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  13. Erin85

    Erin85 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello! I'm a bit confused. Was the comment from a t1 or a t2 injecting insulin?

    I was diagnosed t1 nearly 9months ago and was actually encouraged by my nurse to have chocolate!! As a complete chocoholic (I used to eat it every day, I loooooved it!), being denied any refined sugar, alcohol, fruit, snacks or exercise for weeks after diagnosis was really difficult. But once I got my levels down, my nurse encouraged me to have a piece of chocolate after dinner one night. Not every night and not masses of it, but as a treat for doing so well, and to help get back to my 'normal' life, and it was amazing. Now, I have cut sugar from my coffee, politely decline offers of biscuits and sweets, and eat more fruit (with food which are rich in slower carbs, to slow down the digestion of it and the sugar spike). However, I DO eat chocolate at the weekend (again, after my afternoon or evening meal to slow the absorption) and will tell my partner, family and friends around me who judge me for doing so, that type1 diabetics can eat what they like, as long as their insulin covers it and it doesn't affect their bg levels too much. I live a healthy lifestyle, exercising (as best as I can whilst honeymooning and injecting), a healthy diet (the majority of the time), but most importantly (from my perspective) - a healthy outlook. If I denied myself chocolate, I would only get so far then have a binge, have a dreadful spike, feel horrific and pay for it with a lack of sleep. Everything in moderation! :)

    It should also be remembered that everyone is different, everyone's body reacts differently, and what might be right for one could be wrong for another. I know that if I have too much, my insulin can't handle the spike, however I plan to enjoy the small things in life, which for me includes a fruity cocktail (with real fruit juice!!! :) ) and a dessert every now and then....and chocolate every weekend lol. I have a great hba1c and am happy with my diet, lifestyle and diabetes management :)
     
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  14. BeccyB

    BeccyB Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Please don't judge these people so much!

    As they are 'young people' they are most likely T1s and the root of this thread all goes back to the debate about T1 & T2 being confused as they are so different in reality. If us lot can't get it straight how on earth is everyone else supposed to understand?!

    In defence of all the T1s out there enjoying a treat....
    The DAFNE course which is highly recommended for T1s (by both medical professionals and many many posts on here) actually stands for 'Dose Adjustment For Normal Eating' i.e. we are taught to eat as any non-diabetic would and adjust our insulin dose to take account. It's true that a sugary treat is probably going to give you a 'spike' but a 'normal' healthy diet would recommend you didn't eat too much / too often anyway so it's the same consideration really.
     
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  15. BeccyB

    BeccyB Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Off topic but I just wanted to give a round of applause to @Erin85 - so pleased you've got yourself to this happy position so soon after diagnosis. Long may it continue! :)
     
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  16. Erin85

    Erin85 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Aw, thank you @BeccyB ! That's really kind of you :D just need to work out the honeymoon and I'll be onto a winner lol ;)
     
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  17. Claire007

    Claire007 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Can you explain? What's wrong with it? If I want some chocolate, I look at the carb content and inject insulin acooring to my ratio. I don't do it every day, not even every week. That's how I've been taught, that's what carb counting is. I'm well confused.
     
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  18. Robbity

    Robbity Type 2 · Expert

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    I think its because type 2s have to, in general, watch their diet and should avoid sugary foods because they can't adjust anything to compensate for extra carbs, and they aren't necessarily aware that diabetics who need to use insulin are not in the same situation - something I've learned from our forum. So they probably mistakenly believe because it's "wrong" for us, it's wrong for all diabetics.

    Robbity
     
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  19. Daphne917

    Daphne917 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    I'm Type 2 diet controlled, have an hba1c of 36 and have a piece or two of 95% plain chocolate occasionally which I enjoy. Regardless of whether we are T1 or T2 we are all informed individuals who can decide what to eat and the consequences of our actions
     
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  20. Cl1ve

    Cl1ve Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Just have to say what a really balanced comment the above is . Nice to here from someone with a sensible outlook on diabetes

    Clive
     
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