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Fear of needles, can’t take insulin

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by Emily1991, Jan 24, 2021.

  1. Emily1991

    Emily1991 Type 1 · Newbie

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    Hi everyone,
    I was diagnosed in April 2020 and before that have been terrified of needles. I’ve used insulin since April but today have had a bit of a set back and haven’t taken my insulin because I got the fear of injecting myself due to the needles. Can somebody please help me with any tips? I have all the equipment I just need to get my brain to cooperate please.

    And I apologize in advance if im breaking any community rules. I just don’t know what to do/how to get over the psychological barrier in my head.
     
    • Hug Hug x 5
  2. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hi @Emily1991 ,

    Welcome to the forum.

    I'm sorry you're feeling anxiety regarding your kit.

    Is it possible for to administer your insulin as you were advised to something like a soft skinned fruit first?
    Sort of get into a calm mood for the routine. Put yourself in a calm place before the "real thing."

    Back in my day I practiced on an orange with the support of my mum.

    Best wishes.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  3. Emily1991

    Emily1991 Type 1 · Newbie

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    Hi Jaylee,

    Thank you for the tip, I’ll try that.
     
  4. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Try to think of something you like doing & "multitask" the needful with the insulin to the "something you like doing."
    Also, pick up your insulin pen & just fiddle with it whilst chilling out.. Maybe chatting to some one? Make it an every day tool a little like a knife & fork.
     
  5. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    Hi. Where are you injecting? I assume you have small 4mm needles? There are 'cover's for those with needle fear to help
     
  6. Jollymon

    Jollymon Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Insulin just needs to be injected under the skin. Not into the muscle mass below. Remember this!

    Sometimes I use a short chip clip to pinch up the skin and make a tent. The chip clip hurts, but it’s a distraction for the injection site. Then I inject into the raised up portion of skin. The sooner I inject the faster I can remove the chip clip.

    The chip clip is really handy for me when I inject into the back of my arm, since I have to do this one handed without the help of the hand attached to the arm that’s being injected.
     

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  7. Emily1991

    Emily1991 Type 1 · Newbie

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    In the stomach usually
     
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
  8. Dr Snoddy

    Dr Snoddy Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Would using numbing ointment on the site first help?
     
  9. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    Hi. I found the stomach hurt initially but after a good few weeks pain stopped when I injected. The outer thighs are also good or the buttocks. Is it the pain or the thought of the needle?
     
  10. KK123

    KK123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Emily, is it the fear of a needle hurting or is it a psychological fear of the needle itself, ie like claustrophobia? There IS a difference of course because there are a few tips to make it not hurt but that won't necessarily help with a (usually illogical) phobia. If it's the latter, PLEASE speak to your diabetes team because you will quickly become poorly. x
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  11. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Do you live with anyone else? If it's got too much for you it might help to look away while someone else does it. (It's better for you to do it, because you quickly learn how to do it without it hurting, but sometimes it can help to give up control to a trusted family member for a while.) I remember when I was diagnosed as a child the clinic had me doing injections from day 1 but after about 6 months I became upset about the whole thing and my mum sat me down and did my injections for a couple of days. (No, she didn't hold me down while I was screaming :), I just remember feeling relieved that she took control for a bit.)

    Lots of virtual hugs. I am phobic about spiders and am so grateful that I don't have an illness where the only treatment requires me to get up close and personal with a big furry 8 legged thing several times a day...
     
    • Winner Winner x 1
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