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Feeling peturbed

Discussion in 'Emotional and Mental Health' started by Katrina5664, Apr 22, 2017.

  1. Katrina5664

    Katrina5664 Type 1 · Active Member

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    Hi,
    I was diagnosed with T1 in August of last year after an operation on a badly infected insect bite on my back - I haTd been feeling tired etc for a couple of weeks. When I came round and realised I was going to live I was told about the T1 and that my blood sugar level had been 40 and my Ha(whatever) had been 113. Anyway I spent 3 weeks in hospital and once discharged I expect I had similar experiences to those who have gone before me. I have spent the last few months getting to grip with both the healing wound on my back - original size 14cm by 7cm now down to 5cm by 2.5cm - and trying to get my head round controlling my T1 with which has come a couple of complications the worst being bowel issues. That is the background to my story.
    The reason for this post is that about 25 years ago my brother was diagnosed T1 and I am afraid right from the start his attitude has been to ignore it and really not control it that is his right and he wants no pity for his current situation but it scares the hell out of me AM I GOING DOWN THE SAME ROAD. He has had two strokes the second of which has left him paralysed down his right hand side. Before having his strokes he had an ulcer on his right foot which they were unable to treat and having the strokes which affected that side meant that he had to have first his foot and then his lower leg amputated. He now has an infection in his left foot and things are not looking good. I am trying really, really hard to control things but I am still terrified that genetics will come into play and I will go the same way. He is two years younger than me. I know it is not inevitable that the same will happen to me but I am still concerned.
    Reading this back it is a right muddle but even if no-one reads this I feel so much better for writing this down.
    Katrina
     
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  2. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    Genetics has nothing to do with it - my grandmother died from the complications of type 2 diabetes. I have type 2 - am I going to go the same way?
    No chance.
    Old Nick will be skating to work the day I start to eat things which put my BG levels continually beyond normal levels.
    I went from full blown diabetic with Hba1c of 91 to prediabetic levels of 47 at my second test.
    I try to keep my post meal readings below 7 - not always successfully, I am so tempted by fresh fruits - but it gives me something to aim for.
    My moto is becoming 'accept nothing less than normality' - but I am so smug when I test my BG and see 6.8 after dinner, or 7.1 after strawberries...
    As a type 1 you will always need insulin, but you can always eat strawberries.
    You can control this.
     
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  3. Scott-C

    Scott-C Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @Katrina5664 , No, absolutely not, but you might end up on that road if you make stupid decisions like your brother seems to have made. The fact you're asking for advice about this stuff suggests you're clued up enough to avoid some of the messier aspects of T1.


    T1 can be a very, very savage condition if you ignore it. You only need to look at the "diabetes complications" thread on this website to see stories from young people who thought, "I'm young, doesn't matter, I'll fix it later", to see how quickly some bad damage can happen.

    But, while there's a lot of people who sail along quite happily at 15 for extended periods, and then inevitably end up with problems, there's a huge number of us who say, "right, this is messy, it's going to take a lot of my time to keep in range as best I can, but I'd rather do that than lose limbs or go blind."

    I've taken it seriously from the start. Thirty years in, I'm doing fine, not going blind anytime soon, all limbs in place. I go out for a few beers at the weekend, eat where and what I want.

    I do all that, live my life pretty much as I want, but I do always keep an eye on whether I'm broadly between 4.7 and 7.4, but don't sweat it if I go out of range too much. As long as I'm there most of the time, I'm fine with that.

    I don't think genetics come into this at all. It's more to to do with the fact that, as you say, your bruv has ignored it. He's made a mistake, don't you do it too.
     
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  4. therower

    therower Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Katrina5664 . Welcome to the forum. Firstly I'm sorry to hear about your brothers situation.
    Secondly and more importantly is you. NO you are not on the same road. You can choose any road you like in life. Having T1 should not stop you taking your chosen route. Yes the journey may prove more challenging than for someone without diabetes but it's still the same road, you as a diabetic will just need to take more care whilst using the road. You can't ignore the speed limit, you can't cut the corners you need to observe all the road signs.
    You have to own your diabetes, don't ignore it ( it's not going away ). Be proud to have diabetes, it can be a very useful condition th have if you can learn how to manage and control it.
    Genetics shouldn't be of no concern to you. In a way you're fortunate, you have seen the power of uncontrolled T1 diabetes and you definitely do not have to go on that journey down that road.
    Keep posting, there's some great advice to be had on the forum.
     
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  5. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    Have a read of Dr bernstein's latest book. He's been type1 for decades.
    Very inspirational and spot on.
     
  6. Katrina5664

    Katrina5664 Type 1 · Active Member

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    Thank you everyone. I know it is up to me to take a different route but it is hard not to see a similarity and let it get you down. I do have pretty good levels - in fact having read other threads I think I am doing quite well - my levels are usually around 4.8 to 6 during the day and when I check after meals they are between 8 and 10 so pretty good. They go up to 10 or 11 by 22.00 but that is because I think I need to split my Lantus dose to 2 injections at 12 hours between them.
    Thank you all for reading this it is very kind.
    Katrina
     
  7. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    Yes, those are good levels - well done :) There's absolutely no reason why you should go down the same road as your brother. You're in control and you have some choice over what road you choose to follow :)

    Think Like A Pancreas is the most popular book among Type 1s - and for good reason. I keep mine both to refer to for information and to cheer myself up as it's written in a friendly, readable way. If you haven't got it already, I recommend it highly.

    Don't focus on the negative things. Focus on how well you're doing - and you really are doing well :)
     
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  8. Katrina5664

    Katrina5664 Type 1 · Active Member

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    Thank you azure. Yes I have the book I also have the carbs and cals book which is never far from my kitchen.
    Katrina
     
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