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feeling weak lchf not sure keto

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by Charis1213, Mar 8, 2019.

  1. IanD

    IanD Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I think you should see your doctor. Your problems are unlikely to be solely due to diet.
     
  2. Charis1213

    Charis1213 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I will go Monday I get depressed I already see the doctor for this .
     
  3. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    That’s the spirit. Pretty sure you’re not going to be beaten by glucose. How silly would that be? Onwards into battle!
     
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  4. mariavontrapp

    mariavontrapp Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm not sure how long you have been low-carbing, but I went through some similar things and it has taken me about 8 weeks to settle into it. My thighs have also been affected and my legs felt weak when walking. I had low carb flu for about a week and then brain fog. I also felt a bit down. So what I had to do was read up on what a well- formulated LCHF diet would look like, and address any nutritional deficiencies. I also had to be patient whilst my body adjusted. Things that helped me were - adding more salt, taking magnesium supplements and taking B vitamins - these may be particularly important for you if you are feeling down. Low carbing without the help of a dietitian or other medical professional can be very difficult and scary. We shouldn't have to be put in this position where we have to go it alone, but sadly many of us are, and I think this can add to feelings of anxiety as we have the additional worry about whether we are doing the right thing. Keep posting and asking for advice on the Forum. Wishing you all the best x
     
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  5. Charis1213

    Charis1213 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    thank you my friend said to ask the doctor for some blood tests for deficiencies so will ask but I'm not holding my breath.

    I also get concerned because i love walking but when i walk my blood sugar is 7.2 which says it is high on here as fasting results but in theory it is only 3 hours after eating , but during the day my sugars are 6.2 two hours after eating , my morning numbers are nearly always 6.7 and 6.9 but strange that after a walk its is over 7 . Thought exercise was supposed lower it lol .
     
  6. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    9 months in my figures are similar to yours. I get frustrated others improve faster than me. But I don’t know their bodies or how long they’ve had insulin resistance issues. Honestly I think mine have been there since teenage years. A loooonnng time. Short term some (most) exercise increases my numbers. Long term better fitness and muscles will improve it.

    I see it as a shock reaction which will toughen me and my IR up long term.
     
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  7. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
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    Charis, I think you have made huge adjustments, very fast and that takes a lot of getting used to in both body and mind. If you are a bit prone to an emotional rollercoaster, it's only to be expected it'll butt in from time to time.

    In your shoes, I'd see my Doc and ask if I could have a decent check-up, including a good wide panel of blood tests, to cover vitamins, and hormones, as well as some of the usual diabetes stuff.

    In terms of weightloss, it's a complete and total pain that our losses - particularly the fast ones go from parts we're less happy about. Most of us have places we'd like or l would have liked to tackle, but it rarely works like that.

    I've often said it takes a whole for our bodies to catch up with weight loss. When I got very slim, I still had a bit of an up and down figure. OK, I was used to that, as I'd always been that way, but a fair while later, "all of a sudden" I had a waist. A little, slim waist! At the same sort of time, I realised other bits of me had "softened up a bit", so it seems my long held belief that our bodies shuffle the remianing fat around.

    I just wish my body would get with that belief and pad my backside a bit more!

    Don't be despondent Charis. You've done incredibly well, but you've passed the "new and exciting" phase and are now in the "better really get used to this" phase, which is just a bit boring.

    In terms of the emotional rollercoaster, a look at the Kubbler Ross Change Curve could be worthwhile. We don't enter the curve at any defined place and nor do we leave in a defined place, and sure as heck we all revisit it from time to time.

    upload_2019-3-9_4-52-0.png
     
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  8. briped

    briped Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I can relate to that. It's so hard to watch the decline of a person you love, especially if that person is a parent whose genetic make up you may have inherited. How old was your dad when he passed away, and did it happen recently? How was he treated for T2, meds?
    As I see it you're attacking your diabetes head on with your diet, and that's the best you can do. You turned your fears into useful fighting mode and went on LCHF, because what's the alternative? End up like your dad? I fully get you. There's no guarantee that we won't get dementia, or cardiac disease, but all we can do is try our best and believe in what we do.
    I see that you're roughly my age, and I think it's only natural at our age that the aging process and passing away of our parents make us sit up and think, and worry about where we ourselves will be in 20 years time. Especially if this was a lengthy and emotionally draining process, where you spent so much time with him. Don't underestimate the stress this caused you, and yes it will stay with you for a while, and may well have aggravated other mental issues like PTSD. Did you have any counselling to help you through your grief? At least give yourself several pats on your back for being there for him. Doesn't it help you to know that you didn't let him down?
    There's nothing we can do to make us younger, apart from taking care of ourselves to the best of our abilities, and try to stay positive about it - oh, and stop comparing ourselves to other people including our husbands (nah, I only have the one ;)). Mine can eat anything, is 65 and have never had any of the probs I have at 58. That's just how it is. I've stopped reading success stories for the same reason. I don't shed kgs like so many others, and my BG-levels are slowly on their way up, in spite of my keto'ing, but my alternative is to throw the towel in the ring, increase my meds and start a fast spiral downwards. Success stories make me feel like a failure, so I compete with myself nowadays.
    My background for relating to what you've been through? My mum passed away from vascular dementia 3 years ago. Watching her decline over +10 years was a, well, I can't quite find the words to descibe that experience, but it was no fun.
    While having no fun with that, I watched my previously so brilliantly intelligent dad turn into a heavy alcoholic because that was how he coped with my mum's illness. They both ended up at the same ****** nursing home. My dad passed away last July. He died from a probably alcohol related cancer that wasn't diagnosed till a week or two before he passed.
    I spent 10+ years travelling to be with them at least once a month. One year I was one flight away from getting a free flight with Norwegian to Thailand as a bonus.
    We don't know the future. Who knows, I may end up with vascular dementia too, and without loving children to look after me, but I really try hard not to think too much about it. Sometimes I wonder if my mum's vascular dementia could've been caused by her perpetual low fat diet, and yes, she was on statins too.
     
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  9. amyhowes

    amyhowes Type 1 · Member

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    Keep an eye on your blood glucose as it can effect your mood too
     
  10. Carbon

    Carbon · Active Member

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    I felt angry too when I first learnt I had T2.... no history of it at all in family, it came after my divorce.
    It's not easy but it will get better...
     
  11. Sminkypinky_

    Sminkypinky_ Type 2 · Member

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    I don't have any T2 advice or pearls of wisdom for you and I can't make the difficulties you are facing right now disappear. But what I will say Charis is this... Be kind to yourself. You are an amazing, unique individual. There is no-one else like you. Only compare yourself to you to truly know what's working and what's not. Don't just treat your T2, treat the whole you. You are enough. I'm sending you a virtual hug as it sounds like you need one right now. I hope that's OK.
     
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  12. kyler

    kyler Type 2 · Active Member

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    Well I find it hard work keeping D2 in check and at 1st I used to worry if I one of my finger prick readings was over 8 but now I just watch what I eat keep carbs low and protein at about 70g each day and exercise 6 times a week energy level are much better now and I feel lot better my last a1c came out at 52 not ideal but I feel fine which is main thing.
    We are all different and I know some people would be horrified at this level but it works fine for me.
    Eating very low carb did reduce my energy level hence I keep carbs low now and we gan get our energy from protein and fats works fine for me Best of luck and think positive.
     
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