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Flu and pneumonia jabs

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by mikecarter, Sep 27, 2008.

  1. joe159

    joe159 · Active Member

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    I have never had a flu jab as I seen it as pointless as it just protects you from one strain and there are thousands of strains.
    however' now I have T1 I will get it' quite frankly the fact that I have T1 shows that my body is not right and I need as much protection as possible.
    Cheers
    Joe
     
  2. mikecarter

    mikecarter · Active Member

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    I think the main reason I didn't appreciate your advice is that I stated I had already had both jabs.So your comment was unbelievably unhelpful. I also find it really annoying when people hide behind a catch all politically correct/incorrect adolescent argument so they can say incredibly stupid things. If I'd wanted to hear a load of ******** I'd have posted my question on a football website.

    (Language edited, Sugarless Sue )
     
  3. graham64

    graham64 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi,
    I've had the flu jab for the past 4 years no side effects NO FLU :!: :!: :!:
     
  4. gaynor

    gaynor · Active Member

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    Can we all please remember whilst posting our replies we do have some children on this forum. Maybe the language should be toned down a bit!
     
  5. mikecarter

    mikecarter · Active Member

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    Sorry .... Feelings and fever running high. Point taken and will be remembered! :oops:
     
  6. andyrobo

    andyrobo · Member

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    I have chosen not to have either of these jabs, as I am in generally good health and have never had flu before (at least not to my knowledge!!)

    So I am sure I will get it this Winter for that!!

    Maybe when I am a bit further down the diabetic line then I may chose to have it, but I dont feel any further at risk than last year.

    Each to their own choice - and I am led to believe that the surgery get paid for each jab given - not sure though!
     
  7. swine1

    swine1 · Active Member

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    People should make up their own minds. Flu kills. Get the jabs, you may get lucky.
    Regards.
     
  8. efaitch

    efaitch Type 2 · Member

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    The flu jab may not be necessary for some people. However, for some of us (me and my unborn child), a bout of flu would no doubt be more serious than a flu jab to prevent it.

    I agree that the flu jab may not be beneficial to everyone with diabetes. However, for some of us (me and unborn baby), it could literally be a life saver.

    Fiona
     
  9. davehunter

    davehunter · Member

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    Haha classic! Can anyone spot the mistake?!......


    My question is where can the flu jab be given. I've had it once before in my arm but ended up with a dead arm for about a week. I've heard conflicting information about where it can and can't be given?

    Cheers
    Dave
     
  10. sugarless sue

    sugarless sue · Master

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    I usually get it in the arm with no problems
     
  11. DiabeticSkater

    DiabeticSkater · Well-Known Member

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    I get a dead arm too. I would imagine the jab could be given in the buttocks or the legs. But having a dead bum or leg would be a nightmare. :lol: My only concern about the jab is the fact that the influenza virus is virile and can mutate quite easily. Could this cause the virus to mutate into a super flu? Its certainly a possiblilty.
     
  12. Thirsty

    Thirsty · Well-Known Member

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    DS, the flu virus is quite capable of becoming a "super flu" without any help from us. As you say, it mutates all the time, some strains being far more dangerous than others; that's why a new vaccine is made available every year.

    I suspect you're thinking of so-called superbugs like MRSI which have become resistant to antibiotics, probably as a result of over-prescribing. Vaccines work in a different way to antibiotics and prevent you from becoming ill in the first place, as well as stopping you from infecting others. And they do work! Seen anyone with smallpox or polio in Britain recently?
     
  13. DiabeticSkater

    DiabeticSkater · Well-Known Member

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    not seen anyone with pox or polio recently. but the TB situation is very worrying indeed.
     
  14. Thirsty

    Thirsty · Well-Known Member

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    Agreed, TB isn't a disease you'd want to get in a hurry, although it's caused by bacteria rather than a virus. Worryingly, polio has resurfaced in many African countries due to a refusal by some communities (notably Muslims) to allow their children to receive the vaccine, due to false claims about its safety. Similarly people are being put at risk due to the brouhaha over the MMR jab causing autism, also unproven and almost certainly false.

    I think it's a great pity that scaremongerers are hampering successful programs to control and/or eradicate extremely dangerous diseases.
     
  15. viv1969

    viv1969 · Well-Known Member

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    I have never had a 'flu jab, and have also not had the 'flu. As mentioned previously, these vaccinations cover just a few of the many strains of influenza, and even then are not 100% effective (of course no vaccine is 100%, this is not news :) )
    After research, for me, it is a personal risk assesment and decision.
    I choose not to take up the offer of a vaccination. Doesn't make me a bad person, doesn't make me a fool.
     
  16. graham64

    graham64 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Viv,
    Unlike you I have had the Flu, it was a particulary nasty strain and it took me months to get over it. I know the Jab does not cover every strain but if it reduces the odds I'm all for it. What would the effects of flu have on your BG levels :?: :?: :?: I would not dream of calling you a fool (unless you got the flu that is) everyone is entitled to voice their opinion.

    Regards
    Graham


     
  17. JAD337

    JAD337 · Member

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    Well said Sue. I think the overriding impression I have gained from the Forum in the few weeks I've been looking at it is that we are all different, whether it be our hba1c levels, the point at which we get hypo, whether we are low carbing, whether we are under or overweight etc etc. But hopefully, whatever our problem is, somebody out there can help.
    I too have preferred not to have the flu jab. I wouldn't advise people not to have it, but it must be reassuring for those people who really don't want the jab to know that there are other diabetics out there who have happily taken that "risk", if risk it is.
     
  18. suzi

    suzi · Well-Known Member

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    Hi folks,
    My son and i both had our flu jabs yesterday and yep both have incredibly numb arms. Both of us had a restless night as we couldn't bear to lay on our arms! and Andrew had a dose of the runs this morning, not sure if it was related to jab or not, and as for BS tea time were 28.1 ouch, down by half now with the help of some humalog and hopefully mornings should revert back to normal.
    For us the flu jab is worth it, especially for kids, schools are a breeding ground for all bugs and once in the house they spread like wild fire. I work in a playgroup and often bring home snotty surprises :lol: By the way i get the flu jab because i'm asthmatic, usually get flu anyway but know it would be ten fold without it, and Andrew always likes to see me get my injection first!!!
    Of course at the end of the day it's personal choice, i chose for both of us to get it.
    Suzi x
     
  19. Kazzie

    Kazzie · Member

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    Just something else for us newly diagnosed type 2's to contend with ..... it's frightening enough learning about what may be around the corner as it is!!! I have my next appointment with the nurse next week and have a flu jab booked ... I also need to ask you out there about checking levels as I don't currently do this - is it something I should be doing or is it enough for the nurse to check each month?
     
  20. mikecarter

    mikecarter · Active Member

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    I think you need to be checking your levels so you know which foods are doing what to your blood glucose. When I was first diagnosed about two months ago, I kept a food diary and tested before I ate and 2 hours after eating.I now test 3 times a day ; first thing on a morning, 2 hrs evening meal and usually before I go to bed.I'm lucky that I have been given a repeat prescription for strips.Testing has meant I have been able to see for myself the results of , for example a low carb diet and enabled me to feel confident enough to question the dietician who told me that porridge, potatoes and pasta was the way to go....!!! I was able to monitor the difference between her advice and the advice I had read on the various dietary threads on this forum. 21+ down to 5,6,7 8s in just over a week. Because of testing I now have quite a good idea of what I can eat that helps keep my BG low and it isn't porridge! I also found being able to watch my BG fall a great motivator and enabled me to feel I had gained some control.I was ok with the flu jab but my levels did rise for a couple of days. Badger your nurse for a tester.
     
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