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Freestyle Libre

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by SugarBuzz, Mar 11, 2020.

  1. SugarBuzz

    SugarBuzz Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi.

    Firstly my immediate query. Since I have just taken off my first ever Freestyle Libre (I'm trailing it for a month) - which the doctor actually put on.
    Any tips for putting on a new one? As I haven't got a clue. Does it have to go on a certain part of your body (mine was on my upper arm lower than a t-shirt would go - probably on one of the triceps)?
    And how do you know if you've even attached it properly? (I guess it's a once only thing and if it doesn't attach then that's it - 2 weeks down the drain?).

    Also, I've noticed since I took it off that my arm hurts a bit. Is that normal?

    Is there anyone that has been using this blood sensor for a while (i.e. - several months).

    I'm just wondering if it's been beneficial at all. Like did it help you to get your blood sugar level down/in range?

    Any problems with it falling off? Failing? Did it restrict you doing anything at all?

    Do you worry about any long term thing? I guess having whatever it is stuck in your arm 24/7 hasn't been safety tested over a long period of time.

    Currently I'm back to finger pricking as I'm a bit 'meh' about trying to put a new one on.
     
  2. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    I'd start with the leaflet, looking up a couple of youtube video's can be useful as well.
    If it starts giving you blood glucose values an hour after activating it's fine. If not, call Abbott to tell them what went wrong and they'll send you a new one, provided you followed the instructions in the leaflet.
    You've been using it for 2 weeks. Have you adjusted things because of what you saw on the graphs? It has helped me a lot, but it only does when you look at the graphs and draw conclusions from them.
     
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  3. SugarBuzz

    SugarBuzz Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I should have added that, even though i haven't been to the gym for a month. I'm still 'solid', lol.
    My body fat % is still pretty low (this is why I simply cannot inject insulin anywhere apart from my stomach, as other areas are too painful due to lack of fat - I even had to go down in needle size to a finer smaller one 0.3-0.4mm).
    My arm is pretty solid, those needles hurt if you hit your muscle. And I really wish the doctor hadn't shown me how big that needle is on the sensor and that's in my head, ooouuccch!. :eek:

    I can't do it.

    (edited by mod for language)
     
  4. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    Very skinny small kids can use them.
     
  5. SugarBuzz

    SugarBuzz Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    No. I'm not even sure if the readings are accurate.

    Those arrow things seem pointless too. As ----> seemed to go up quite high a short while afterwards.

    It just seems a bit gimmicky to me.
     
  6. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    It may just not be for you, we're all different.
    Although it's not perfect, it's a lot more than 'gimmicky' to me. There is no way I would be able to manage my diabetes with close to normal blood sugars in a safe way hypo-wise without it.
     
  7. SugarBuzz

    SugarBuzz Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Yeah. As well as possible dubious readings, there is all the other stuff too.

    Having that thing stuck in you 24/7, God knows what it's doing. Then there are the worries about it not attaching properly, falling off (weather, sweat), pain, it getting in the way during activities, then the fact that you have a big obvious white thing stuck on your arm and all the questions that come with that.

    One really big thing i found annoying was the fact you couldn't go back into the meter and edit the notes (carb dosages) etc.

    As you can tell, I'm far from being convinced about this thing.
     
  8. Coop7640

    Coop7640 · Newbie

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    I have used one for 3 months now. I have had no problem at all. I just love it. I use the phone app. It has totally help me get my diabetes back under control. I will never go back. I also change arms every 2 week. I'm a very active person I have never have one come off. I hope this helps.
     
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  9. becca59

    becca59 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @SugarBuzz it certainly sound as though Libre is not for you. You seem to have talked your way out of it before you even started. If you are in the UK getting one of these on the NHS can be an uphill struggle for some. The fact that you seem not to be bothered and perfectly happy with your present management of this condition is good. Let someone who really wants it have the chance.
     
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  10. kaylz91

    kaylz91 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    people are on insulin pumps which is constantly delivering insulin so a small filament in your arm 24/7 shouldn't be too much of a problem, your only thinking of negative things so if that's the way your thinking then yeah I'd say it wasn't for you
     
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  11. Fazzy

    Fazzy · Member

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    To confirm the needle is just used during the application process and the device has a small flexible filament that sits under your skin. I have been using one since being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the start of Jan. Application to the arm is super easy and I feel no pain at all even though I have very low body fat as I lost a huge amount of weight because of the diabetes. The instructions are clear on the leaflet and the Abbott website has some good information on the device.

    The sensor is really stuck solid to my arm and the most pain I experience is peeling it off when it is due for a change. It has really helped me manage my diabetes. The trend arrow is helpful but of course the reading has about a 10 min delay compared to a fingerprick test therefore make sure you always have your glucose meter incase of hypos.
     
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  12. SugarBuzz

    SugarBuzz Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks to those of you that actually looked at my questions and gave helpful responses. :)
     
  13. SugarBuzz

    SugarBuzz Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I understand that a number of people here are based in the UK and so will get this on the NHS.

    But for those that aren't (or have at least had the misfortune to have 'lost' their prescription on their foreign travels and had to buy from a pharmacy) How much are you paying for a 28 day supply (i.e. - 2). Usually when a 'new' technology comes out it's pretty expensive.

    I know a box of One Touch Test Strips is currently about £45 for 50 strips in an EU pharmacy.
     
  14. Rokaab

    Rokaab Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Not that many get it on the NHS to be honest, they reckon only about 20% will get it on prescription, luckily I do now get it on prescription but I did self fund for 2 years and it cost me about £100 a month (the VAT exemption definitely helped) - and teh price may have gone up since then

    Certainly it has helped me (mainly due to the fact I never used to test nearly enough) immensely, but as others have said they don't work for everyone
     
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  15. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    Other brands are cheaper, and meters are very cheap and sometimes free when you ring the manufacturer.

    I've been self-funding Libre for almost 3 years at 120 euros a month, only last 6 months have been cheaper because I had family members buying them for me in France, wher they cost 37 euros a piece.
    I gave up quite a lot of things to be able to fund my sensors, it's worth it for me.
     
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  16. POTS01

    POTS01 · Member

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    I have been using the libra for nearly 9 months now. It goes in the centre of your triceps around where a standard t-shirt finishes. I have only managed to partially rip one off on a door frame. Pushed it back in and it carried on working.
    I find you have to use the readings as a guide, really helps show any patterns and help with overall control.
    I love it, gives me confidence that I know what my sugar level is at any time.
     
  17. Fairygodmother

    Fairygodmother Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I’ve been using the libre for a year and a half now. I use KT tape to secure it more firmly and add extra water resistance should I want to laze a little longer in the bath. It helps prevent me knocking it off too. I’ve also invested in a MiaoMiao - it’s a device that provides a sophisticated interface between the libre and an app. The MiaoMiao can be set to give me alerts when I go outside the blood sugar range I set; it also allows me to calibrate with fingerprick tests. I’d hate to be without it now! I still get the days when bloods are riding a pogo stick but the alerts let me know when they’ve jumped too high or fallen too low.
     
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  18. Copernicus

    Copernicus Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Slight change of topic, but is anyone still having a problem with getting sensors, or has the supply "caught up" with demand.
     
  19. Ashleighrose414

    Ashleighrose414 Type 1 · Member

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    I have had my libre for about 6 month now, got it on prescription because I was checking my blood sugars 30+ times a day (you can imagine what that did to my poor finger tips).
    I do find that sometimes it hurts when I first put it on because i have skinny arms, but i alternate the site on my arm (right top, left top, right bottom, left bottom) and it gives the site enough time to heal. Taking it off is about as painful as taking off a plaster, you get used to it. Also, its meant to go on the back of your arm, on the 'bingo wing', and as of yet I've not caught it on anything by having it there, as i rarely walk through doorways backwards.
    I wore it in florida after only having it for 2 months, and it withstood 40c temperatures, sweat, florida rain and humidity just fine. Also had it on display because it was hot, only had one person comment on it in two weeks. no one really cares.
    I've found to be the best thing for controlling my blood sugars, as i just swipe my phone and ive got my bg, i find it way less of a hassle than testing in public, at work, at the gym etc. I wouldn't be without it.
     
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  20. Ushthetaff

    Ushthetaff Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I’ve been on the Libre for well over a year now and definitely wouldn’t want to go back to finger pricking full time. It certainly helped me get my Hb1Ac down from 98 to 54 , I’m a bit of a rebel so I put mine on my belly , readings tie in with finger prick cross check so it’s all good , I changed to my belly as I use to knock it against a door frame too! But now they don’t fall off.
    it’s not for everyone but I would recommend it
     
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