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Frozen Shoulder

Discussion in 'Other Health Conditions and Diabetes' started by Andy12345, May 23, 2014.

  1. ButtterflyLady

    ButtterflyLady Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Wonderingwhy is there any way you can see a different doctor? Doctors are supposed to treat us with basic respect, answer questions, give accurate and helpful information, and work together with us in a partnership where both sides bring something important to the table.

    It can be really hard to find a doctor who works like this, but my advice is to keep trying. I have "trained" my doctor to understand that I look for my own info not to challenge her but to fill in the gaps in my understanding. Sometimes I have suggested things that she has agreed are helpful.

    I have found physiotherapy good for joint and muscle pain. Here is a website with a lot of good info you might find helpful:
    https://www.painscience.com/

    I'm a little confused as to why you are prescribed domperidone for stomach lining inflammation, when it is usually meant to treat nausea and delayed gastric emptying. It can be good for reflux. Do you take it 3 times a day? Also, have you tried a proton pump inhibitor such as omeprazole? This would lower the stomach acid and give the lining a bit of a break from being irritated. Long term naproxen can irritate/inflame the stomach lining. Both domperidone and naproxen increases the risk of cardiac issues. You might find that a cox-2 inhibitor like celebrex is better for your stomach than naproxen, but it has the same cardiac risks.

    It's such a shame that almost the only effective options for anxiety are drugs like clonazepam, which are addictive and have numerous side effects. If it was my doctor, they would have increased the fluoxetine to the max of 40mg instead of prescribing clonazepam, but I know how much you probably benefit from clonazepam and it would be hard to give it up.

    I'm not very familiar with hydromorphone dosages but do you take 1mg a day or several times a day, if so, how much total for the day? If it's not enough, your doctor should let you have more, or switch to another opioid. Codeine causes too much constipation for the pain relief it provides, and tramadol doesn't work for everyone, so morphine, oxycodone and fentanyl are the other options. Slow release forms are usually better too. Super important to treat any constipation you get from opioids, with a prescription senna-based laxative such as laxsol, and fibre such as psyllium. Eating lots of veges helps too.

    One thing you didn't mention is Vitamin D3, which is needed for anyone who doesn't get enough sun. I live in a cold-ish climate area where the doctors prescribe D3 to pretty much everyone who has pain issues, because it is assumed we are deficient because of lack of sunlight in winter. Here is some info about it:
    https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminD-HealthProfessional/

    You might want to ask for your B12, folate and magnesium levels to be checked.

    I know you ask your doctor for answers and he just hands you pills, but with the conditions you have it is very hard for any doctor to give useful answers. To a large degree, those pills are most likely to be necessary. I am in a similar boat, and have had to accept that I need a lot of meds and that my symptoms can't be completely controlled. The meds help me have fairly good quality of life though.

    I wish you the best.
     
  2. SmileyB4

    SmileyB4 Type 1 · Member

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    I went to see the doc about my shoulder on Tuesday. I injured my shoulders last summer and preferred not to see the doc, just hoped it would go away! It did.... after 10 months!:***:
    It came back last week and I also can't move either of my shoulders, changing or even getting up is such a struggle... I have a daughter with severe difficulties, so I can't afford to be able to rest or not help out! The GP never put it down to a frozen shoulder like I thought he would, he is sending me for x-rays, given me something to help me sleep at night (which he said will help the pain... and it HAS!). He suspects it tendenitis (spelling), so he's told me to try and rest it, rather than giving me exercises.
    I've been very impressed with my gp and how seriously he's taken this. I think he's aware of the difficulties I have with my daughter, so he's trying to get it resolved asap. :) xxx
     
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  3. ButtterflyLady

    ButtterflyLady Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    That's great news, @smiley. I have had shoulder tendonitis, and my physio recommended ice rather than heat, and it really helped.

    Out of curiosity, what was the medication he gave you for sleep and pain? I am always looking at options for those things.
     
  4. lizzybee

    lizzybee Type 2 · Newbie

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    I find this all very helpfull, but I am in a very confused state, can anyone help please
     
  5. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Moderator
    Staff Member

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    Hi and welcome @lizzybee

    You may find you get more response if you start a thread of your own, asking about the things that are causing you confusion.
    This is an old thread that no one has posted on for more than 2 years.

    If you click on this link
    https://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/category/greetings-and-introductions.20/
    and then hit the green button saying Post New Thread
    Then you can have a new thread open where you can ask all the questions you like. :)
     
  6. Fenn

    Fenn Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Lizzybee, What was you question? I’m currently “enjoying” my second frozen shoulder
     
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  7. MangosteenElbow

    MangosteenElbow Type 1 · Active Member

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    I had "frozen shoulder" after onset of LADA but before MDI.
    Hugely painful and disruptive si I empathise.
    Very briefly, disclaiming etc but only sharing ... I researched it thoroughly across many published papers.
    In brief:
    There's a physiological difference between encapsulitis and "frozen shoulder" (which does not seem to have a generic nedical description because it is less definable than encapsulitis).
    The pathologies of both are poorly understood.
    Therefore the treatments and therapies are poorly justified and structured.
    It is common for GPs to advise of the availability of cortisol injections and exploratory surgery. They ought to advise of the availability but also the limited use of them especially for frozen shoulder. Neither addresses the pathology that is the underlying cause.
    I wad advised thst it could take 18 months to resolve wirhout intervention. 6 months of unrelenting pain and limited use. 6 months of less pain and limited use but noticeable. 6 months to fade away.
    After rejecting the knife and cortisol some minrhs later I found a research paper from a French therapist. Although the paper was low on the grade of evidence, it gave practical exercises that I could try for free.
    I did.
    I found benefits within a week or so - enough improvement to suggest it was not improving suddenly of its own accord.
    I am reluctant to specify the paper due to online trolls who will wrongly focus on one paper (when I have carefully consider ovwr a hundred published papers with better quaility evidence). I suggest you explore yourself online DYI physical therapies specifically for frozen shoulder, avoiding gurus, people who sell magic solutions or foods as cures.
    After MDI and long after my frozen shoulder mostly resolved itself I went keto and onto a pump. I woukd say that numerous indicators of many kinds of inflammation disappeared with my keto such that I feel tremendously better for it.
    I hypothesise that had I been on keto earlier, I would not have succumbed to shingles or, shortly after that, frozen shoulder. As I wrote above, the pathology of frozen shoulder us poorly understood, but if you are living with it (high pain, limited movement, extreme psin on being jarred or sneezing, inability to lift ...) and suffering the consequences within the family etc., it's worth considering both the DYI physical therapy and the nutrition hypothesis.
     
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  8. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Ive only read the first page as I’m half out the door. I just wanted to say last year was miserable for me with a frozen shoulder and impingement too. It start as what felt like a pulled muscle at the top/back of my tricep. It got worse and worse, movement got reduced and the pain centred into the joint itself. Certain movements could almost literally floor me with the pain. I was on at various time anti inflammatory tabs which did nothing, 2 cortisone jabs that also did nothing, physio that made it worse (not unheard of) and finally more and more painkillers turning me into a zombie that couldn’t drive and a arm that barely moved , my dominant one too.

    Eventually physio sent me to a surgeon (you have to go through msk /physio clinic in my area not gp for this). He operated in 3 weeks. Capsular release. Ie inside of shoulder scraped out and shaved some bone to make more space. No way would I have done manipulation. For the first week it hurt like hell and I wished I hadn’t done it. But within 2 weeks I was so glad I did as it was already better and less painful than the 9 preceeding months. Within a month or so I had a lot of movement back and much much better on the pain with no drugs needed. 6 months and most all of it was back, though it still a year later feel a bit “odd”. I couldn’t have lasted another year or more waiting for it to resolve on its own. Surgeon did say with a wry smile it was a bit of a mess and he doesn’t see many that bad.

    So yes see your dr and if the treatment doesn’t at least help ask to move to the next step.
     
  9. buckmr2

    buckmr2 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Just picked up on this thread.
    I suffered from a left frozen shoulder for around 9 months.
    Couldn't raise my left arm above shoulder height
    Was referred to a physio and did numerous exercises including walking hand up wall etc.
    After a month still no better.
    One morning went to the fridge and as I moved a bag of grapes one of the grapes fell out towards the floor With ninja like reflexes I caught the grape but then had excruciating pain in the shoulder for a few minutes as a result of the jolt on it
    When the pain subsided a few minutes later the frozen shoulder pain disappeared.
    That was around 4 years ago and have been pain free in the shoulder ever since.
     
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  10. miltondogs

    miltondogs Type 2 · Member

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    hi has any one had acupuncture for a frozen shoulder iv been offered it but my blood sugars were to high ( 19+) but pain killers work ok at night so will just put up with it
     
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  11. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    My GP advised painful stretching on Amitripyline and ibuprofen rub.
    I'm just left with a painful upper arm rather than an excruciating whole dead weight arm.
    Hoping MSK can help even more. I'm hoping.
     
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  12. Knikki

    Knikki · Guest

    Yep I had acupuncture on one of shoulders when it froze and worked like dream

    Unfortunately the other shoulder froze a few years later but the acupuncture didn't work that time.

    If you have been offered it then certainly worth a try, if mine ever freeze again it's going to be the first thing I try.
     
  13. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I’d certainly try it. It may or may not work but what’s to be lost by trying? I’d have tried anything on offer for mine. If you can get your numbers down to an appropriate level I’d say go fo it
     
  14. Dodo

    Dodo Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I experienced two frozen shoulders some years ago. It seems, according to my Physiotherapist, at the time, it is an extremely common complaint with diabetes. Nothing really worked to help it go away but I was assured it would eventually go of it's own accord. It did! Pain free now for a number of years.
     
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  15. bmtest

    bmtest · Well-Known Member

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    I always check with Doctors 1st off just to test their knowledge with Frozen Shoulders, it is painful and a big pain and restrictive.

    To get rid and have full stretch ability back you have to have the mindset where you want you arm to go it will go there this may take months.

    I do not recommend this but after reading up and doing the wall stretch I screwed 2 hooks into ceiling painted white so wife did not notice bought a weight bar and 2 chains to attach to hooks slid bar inside chains to create a mini trapeze.

    The interesting point I noticed here even when hanging there was distorsion in body caused by frozen shoulder. For several months I hung minutes at a time with the bar and the other stretch i did when awaking on a morning was lay with my hand behind the head which was very painfull but over months the body gets used to it. So rule for me was stretch on any restrictive motion daily.

    Eventually adhesion breaks up in my case approx 2 years but you have to fight for the movement back rather than retire to the new restrictive movement.

    What you tubes on the surgery methods but physio methods work if you pick the correct method and understand how to push pain.
     
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  16. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    I agree because I was told I had a pinched nerve in my neck as my restriction started on just raising my arm a tiny bit. The pain was unbearable with tears on touch. It wasn't hot so no indication of a blood clot. GP diagnosed pinched nerve in upper back.
    Same stretches were advised and I can type again now. Well one finger type on my phone.
    I still get twitches so a nerve problem still.
     
  17. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    Yes I get those sharp pains on moving without thinking but it does seem to allow more movement.
     
  18. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    That may work for a significant number of frozen shoulders but not always.

    I literally couldn’t lift my arm past about 30 degrees regardless of pain (excruciating) and nor could the surgeon even when I was unconscious til he surgically removed the extensive adhesions that were physically blocking movement. There is no way it would reach the trapeze. I had been doing very painful physio for months before it reached this point to try and maintain an ever diminishing range of movement and having cortisone injections to support this along with ice treatment and very strong painkillers. I would have resented quite vocally anyone telling me I was retiring to the lack of movement or giving in to the pain. It was life changing and limiting especially as my dominant arm.

    There is more than one type of surgery too btw. Some just force it and rip the adhesions (personally no way Jose!) others surgically cut them and remove them cleaning the capsule out. I also had bone shaved as it was restrictive.
     
  19. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    Wow @HSSS
    I understand. What caused the extensive adhesions?
     
  20. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I had a minor strain from vigourously vacuuming a car. And it just went from there. It was a year before diagnosis so who knows if undiagnosed diabetes played a role or if I was just unlucky. The surgeon said it was “a really good case” and seemed quite excited about showing me the pictures he took of the inside of my shoulder and then healthy and typical frozen shoulders for comparison.
     
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