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Getting a flu jab

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by Wookie1974, Dec 1, 2020.

  1. Robbity

    Robbity Type 2 · Expert

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    I had flu as a teenager, and don't ever want to repeat the experience so flu jabs are a no-brainer for me. I was "age eligible" for my flu jabs long before I became diabetic, and have more recently also had a pneumonia jab.

    Something to be aware of is that however good your glucose levels may be, illness, fighting infections, etc, WILL raise your glucose regardless, so if you can do anything to potentially avoid or reduce the impact of this happening, it makes perfect sense (to me at least) to do so. I've been T2 for 7 years, and for almost all that time my HbA1c results have been high end of normal - low end pre diabetic (40-43) but I still get occasionally higher levels (45-47) from health (and other) issues.
     
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  2. Daphne917

    Daphne917 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    My OH, who has some health issues, had the pneumonia jab about 5 years ago when he was 57 but I’ve not been offered it yet.
     
  3. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    My OH is the one with health problems and I think that because the wife got hers then, and they really don't know what RH is really about, the nurse suggested that I should have it!
    I had a Quince (severe tonsilitis!) In my late twenties and it took three months of full strength antibiotics for it to clear up, the first day I collapsed with a high fever and I couldn't get out of bed for nearly a week, not that I was aware of anything, my doctor came to me, (wouldn't happen now!) I had three weeks off work and I was continually vomiting from both ends. I was having coolish baths every day. Couldn't eat for about ten days, just some diahorlite to keep my salts up. Plenty of water and so on.

    I had a flu about twenty years ago just before I retired the first time, it layed me out over a couple of days.
    I would have to say that if it had been five years later, it probably would have seen me off.

    My grandson was in hospital for three days last week and is still recovering and needs more investigations when he is better.

    Don't take flu lightly. I struggle to keep my blood glucose levels in normal range when I'm not well.

    Stay safe.
     
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  4. TeddyTottie

    TeddyTottie Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    So I’ve just checked - the NHS website lists those with diabetes as one of the groups eligible for a pneumonia jab and for the flu jab, with no other qualifications as to age or other ailments.

    So if you think it would be of benefit, perhaps it’s something to request from your GP.

    My surgery had a ‘drive-thru’ vaccination morning for the pneumonia jab, which I ruined by turning up on foot because I live a minute’s walk away and the receptionist phoned me back after checking, to say I could, and the nurse was most dischuffed. You’d think I’d defecated on her lawn or something, the fuss she made... there was no queue, she was set up in solitary splendour in the car park and I was bang on time and wearing a mask, just do it already....
     
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  5. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    We call them jobsworth around here.
     
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  6. Wookie1974

    Wookie1974 Type 2 · Active Member

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    I'd better not say what we call them up here!
     
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  7. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    I have used plain English not to upset forum rules!
     
  8. lovinglife

    lovinglife Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I had my pneumonia jab in the first year of my diagnosis at age 44, I always get my flu jab as I had flu before I was diabetic and I never want to be that ill ever again, lost 3 weeks of my life and wasn’t right again for almost 3 months
     
  9. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    No, it was the NHS rules at the time. I wasn't diabetic then and had no underlying illnesses.
     
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  10. DustyHoff

    DustyHoff Type 2 · Newbie

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    If you are diagnosed with diabetes the NHS strongly advises a flu jab, which I have each year, for pre-diabetes I would speak to your healthcare professional about the need for one.
     
  11. bobduff

    bobduff · Member

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    Maybe best to check the ingredients. Some vaccines contain mercury usually disguised as another name such as thimerasol which causes neurological problems and could be the reason why dementia and other issues are on the rise.
    https://vk.ovg.ox.ac.uk/vk/vaccine-ingredients
     
  12. Mr_Pot

    Mr_Pot Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thimerasol is not present in any of the current UK flu vaccines. Even if it was, a vaccine containing 0.01% thimerosal as a preservative contains 50 micrograms of thimerosal per 0.5 mL dose or approximately 25 micrograms of mercury per 0.5 mL dose. For comparison, this is roughly the same amount of elemental mercury contained in a 3 ounce can of tuna fish.
     
  13. Parisemo

    Parisemo Type 1 · Active Member

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    I am type1 and always have the flu jab.
     
  14. Flora123

    Flora123 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Whilst I understand the point you are making, ingesting and injecting are very different for the body. One should not eat much tuna anyway because the heavy metals in it. It is also known that mercury and aluminium in some vaccines can pass the blood brain barrier.
     
  15. Wookie1974

    Wookie1974 Type 2 · Active Member

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    Thanks for all the info folks! Just to say, I had the flu jab yesterday:)
     
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  16. JohnEGreen

    JohnEGreen Other · Master

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    Good, any ill effects?
     
  17. Wookie1974

    Wookie1974 Type 2 · Active Member

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    Yeah have felt aches and pains in the arm, headache and shivering. Nothing too bad, just a bit **** - still be going to work tomorrow :arghh:
     
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  18. antoanto

    antoanto Prediabetes · Newbie

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    It is sensible but not necessary. Real flu can be very nasty.
     
  19. Nicole T

    Nicole T Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    No side effects for me, other than slight tenderness of the injection site for a few hours afterwards. Worst case scenario, it'll give you mild flu symptoms for a couple of days. It's up to you weigh up the risk that you'll feel under the weather for a couple of days, for protection that you might not need if you can avoid infection. If you're successfully isolating for Covid purposes, then perhaps your risk is low. At the same time, combined flu and Covid is something best avoided. That was my main motivator for getting the flu jab this year: I don't want both at once.

    You would hope that with everyone distancing over Covid, flu would be on the decline this year, too. But my son has brought a cold home from school and given it to me (alternating blocked and runny nose, occasional sneezing, slightly sore throat.) Flu and Covid spread through much the same mechanism, so I could just as easily catch those the same way.
     
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  20. TwoRivers

    TwoRivers Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I am also three years in remission but would never go without the flu vaccine. It isn't 100% guaranteed by the way. 70% I seem to recall. But with no side effects and no flu, why go without it? Before I started getting it annually, I skipped flu most years but would get it badly one year in four or one year in five. Unpleasant memories, Why on earth go without the vaccine?
     
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