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Gliclazide tablets

Discussion in 'Other Diabetic Medications' started by Jojo290, Oct 7, 2015.

  1. Jojo290

    Jojo290 Type 2 · Member

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    Hi everyone,

    I'm new to this and posting for some help for my husband!

    He is a type 2 been diagnosed 12 years always taken metformin but recently his levels have been high and they started him on the above a small dose which worked instantly. However at a recent review his levels were still high so they have upped his dose of the above. His levels have gone up since taking this increased dose!! He is obv feeling down about this - did this happen to anyone else or does anyone else have any advice - diet is good he is 42 and active?

    Thanks in advance for any help!! Jo
     
  2. ButtterflyLady

    ButtterflyLady Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi and welcome to the forum. What sort of food does he eat each day? Reducing starchy carbs is key to reducing blood sugar. @daisy1 has some welcome info she posts for new people about this.

    What are his sugar levels like at the moment?
     
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  3. Jojo290

    Jojo290 Type 2 · Member

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    Hi thanks for replying and the welcome! His diet is actually quite low in carbs for those reasons his last reading tonight after the increased dose of the glicazide was 13 which I appreciate isn't hugely high but for him this is high? And after an increased dose of meds we thought it would drop? He has porridge for breakfast couscous for lunch then a healthy evening meal? Lots of veg small carb portion and a quorn meat substitute? Any advice welcome we need to get this under control? Thanks Jo
     
  4. ButtterflyLady

    ButtterflyLady Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    13 is pretty high. I suggest replacing the porridge with full fat greek natural yoghurt and berries, or bacon and eggs. Couscous is fairly carby, he could replace that with a salad with cheese, salmon, tuna, or chicken. For dinner I just have meat and leafy green veges. I don't eat bread, potatoes, rice, pasta, cereal or porridge. He can find out which foods spike his blood sugar by testing before a meal and 2 hours afterwards. His blood sugar should rise by no more than 2 points.
     
  5. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
    Retired Moderator

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    @Jojo290

    Hello and welcome to the forum :) Here is the information we give to new members and I hope this will help you with your husband's diet to help get his levels lower. Ask more questions and someone will be able to help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEW MEMBERS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you’ll find over 150,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.
    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:

    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates

    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    Another option is to replace ‘white carbohydrates’ (such as white bread, white rice, white flour etc) with whole grain varieties. The idea behind having whole grain varieties is that the carbohydrates get broken down slower than the white varieties –and these are said to have a lower glycaemic index.
    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/food/diabetes-and-whole-grains.html

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to bloodglucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
     
  6. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    Hi. As your husband is quite young, I think you need to be considering the possibility of him being Late onset T1 (LADA). Mis-diagnosis is fairly common and I've been down the same path with max dose Gliclazide not working etc. The GP could do a GAD and c-peptide test, but whatever, he/she could increase the Gliclazide up to 320gm and there are other drugs such as Sitagliptin that can be added. These may work for a few years but in the longer term insulin may be needed which is not a problem. I am assuming the low-carb diet is being followed and your husband has a reasonable BMI. Do discuss options with the GP and don't let the GP just assume T2.
     
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  7. Jojo290

    Jojo290 Type 2 · Member

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    Hi thanks for all these points and advice. Much appreciated - I think a trip back to the gp is required as his levels should be going down not up on these tablets!! Thanks again!
     
  8. sillysausage

    sillysausage Type 2 · Member

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    Why gliclazide tablets & not injections ?
     
  9. Jojo290

    Jojo290 Type 2 · Member

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    We asked the nurse about byetta injections but she said he wasn't bad enough for that and too young - however when I spoke to diabetes UK help line they said the injections were better - do you use the injections?
     
  10. ButtterflyLady

    ButtterflyLady Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I'd be cautious about drugs like Byetta because there are significant side effects and risks. Insulin has a better profile of benefits, side effects and risks, IMO, if the person is unable to reduce their BGs by reducing carbs. Keep in mind that he might have late onset T1, and not T2.
     
  11. Jojo290

    Jojo290 Type 2 · Member

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    He was diagnosed t2 in 2003 just lately his levels have gone high whatever we do - they were reluctant to prescribe insulin but his dad who is also type 2 has just gone into it? Maybe we need to see GP not a nurse?
     
  12. ButtterflyLady

    ButtterflyLady Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Daibell's post #6 above explains it better than I can. People can be diagnosed with T2 and have it well controlled for years and then things go haywire. Eventually they find out they have developed late onset T1. Even if this is not the case, then IMO if a person has been genuinely low carbing for at least 3 weeks with no reduction in BGs, they should ask about insulin. I would be asking the GP why they were reluctant to prescribe insulin and what other options they have in mind. I would be seeing a GP not a nurse because this problem seems more complicated than the usual T2 diabetes management that nurses do. I doubt that nurses usually order the T1 tests.

    There is info about insulin here:
    http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/15478720.php
     
  13. Jojo290

    Jojo290 Type 2 · Member

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    Yes I think your right the nurse to be fair didn't seem open to anything other than more tablets which we didn't want I had done research as I had heard not good things about gliclazide! Since found out the nurse has retired - there has been no improvement in 3 months on these tablets and as well he is unbelievably tired yes he works hard and long hours but we haven't had a proper conversation in 3 weeks as he's in bed by 8.30-9! He will take the nurses word because he doesn't like injections but I worry more long term for him?
     
  14. Jojo290

    Jojo290 Type 2 · Member

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    Ps thanks for the article interesting! X
     
  15. ButtterflyLady

    ButtterflyLady Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    He needs to get his BGs under control asap, whether through low carbing or low carbing plus tablets/injections. If he doesn't start low carbing he is highly likely to end up on injections. There's some info about low carbing above in this thread.
     
  16. sillysausage

    sillysausage Type 2 · Member

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    Sorry All, having a wobbly moment...what are Gliclazide tablets for , I know Clexane injections very well ...yuk!
    Apologies for my ignorance.
     
  17. ButtterflyLady

    ButtterflyLady Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    they are a sulphonylurea drug which stimulates the pancreas to produce insulin, which lowers blood glucose
     
  18. DominicLaiYew

    DominicLaiYew Type 2 · Active Member

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    Hello all,
    I am writing to get your opinion & advice on Gliclazide 80mg that i am now taking & maybe some information on the dosage.
    Here are my facts:

    • Newly diagnose Jan 2016 & have been on Met 500mg x2 daily ( about 80 days)
    • Initial BGs levels were at 15-18 mmol/L
    • Controlling BG levels via exercise 5 times a thru week running 8-10 km each session & weight training.
    • Eating a LCHF diet most days, portion control
    • Calorie intake at about 1200-1600 for whole day, burning about 400-500 during exercise ( 1600-400+ 1200)
    • Currently daily reading varies between 6-9, fasting BG stubbornly high at 5-7
    • After meals about 8-9
    After reading this forum & some other diabetic sites, I decided ( without my GPs consent) to switch from Mets 500mg to Gliclazide 80mg x 2, & found that the results were better at lowering my BG
    I have tried & noticed after each meal that i am hyper-sensitive to any WHITE carbos, (eg: White bread,Rice & Noddles) ; have tested that Gliclazide worked faster & longer to reduce my BG level.

    Question: Is my initial dose of 80mg x 2 too high?
    Question: Can i burn out my Pancereas as well?
    I am aware & know how both these drug works & wanted to ask if our members had other experiences that they could share

    Many thanks
     
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