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Type 1 Glucojuice

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by tawsy1, Jun 10, 2017.

  1. tawsy1

    tawsy1 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi,can anyone tell me how many bottles of glucojuice I can take through security at the airport.thanks
     
  2. catapillar

    catapillar Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    The rules on hand luggage liquids through security are here - https://www.gov.uk/hand-luggage-restrictions/overview - I think the glucojuice bottles are 60ml, and a couple of them should fit fine with your other liquids in a 1ltr bag. There is a bit of flexibility if you need more than 1ltr for essential medical purposes. But you shouldn't really need access to tonnes of glucojuice during the flight and going into the checked baggage isn't going to hurt the ones your taking for the holiday.

    Did you not think this question was answered last time you asked it - http://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/threads/juice.104379/
     
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  3. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    I'd take glucose tablets as then you don't have to worry. That's what I do :)
     
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  4. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    Yes, why not take glucose tablets like I do? I've never really seen the need for a glucose drink. The tablets are very small and dirt cheap.
     
  5. DiabeticRuby10

    DiabeticRuby10 Type 1 · Member

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    I'm not sure, as I have never been in an airport in my life as a diabetic . But why not take glucose tablets, they're really small and I take them everywhere with me (hint: the raspberry flavour gluco tabs are the yunmiest, in my opinion!!)
     
  6. MummyX3

    MummyX3 Carer · Newbie

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    I am interested to know this too as gluco juice works best for my son as it is quicker to consume and just the right amount so we don't get the spike in BG afterwards. The speed at which glucose is consumed is all important and makes a big difference to my son compared with gel or tablets. We are going to NZ. Last time we were there only glucose tablets were available and they had less carbs than the ones available here which meant that almost an entire tube might be used depending on the hypo.

    I wondered if anyone had actual experience of taking this through security and what reaction they got. I am guessing with recent security scares that rules may tighten. Last time we found my son had high BG during the flight (lots of reasons including cabin pressure effect on insulin, sitting for so long etc) then when we got off the plane BG plummeted despite eating extra snacks at the time. This led to him collapsing in the line at security, though I have to say they were very good about it and did try to help. Last time I took Gel and tablets but really wish I had taken more of the gel tubes as we ran out quickly and the tablets are not cheap in NZ (though my son loved the lemon ones). There are always juice cartons I suppose, but these are not always suitable, my son has become sick and been admitted to hospital because apple juice was too acidic at the time, gluco juice was used in hospital and I have stuck with these ever since.

    With changes being made to sugar content in drinks, you cannot always rely on the right drink being available when you need it. I always take everything we need when we travel.
     
    #6 MummyX3, Aug 2, 2017 at 2:01 PM
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2017
  7. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    See the reply from @catapillar above.

    You could ring the airports concerned and check with them before flying out to NZ, they'd give you a definitive answer.

    I use GlucoJuice too and agree with you about it being very fast-acting.
     
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  8. db89

    db89 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I had no reaction from putting about 4 GlucoJuices in the clear bags they provide at security a few months ago. They went through the scanner no trouble.

    I also agree about using the GlucoJuice, it might be a bit pricey but it's a good measured dose and I only use it to treat hypos that have come on sharply and are a bit lower. Otherwise I use the tabs and combine with a biscuit for one that is just beginning/comes on slower.
     
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  9. MummyX3

    MummyX3 Carer · Newbie

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    Hello all,
    Just to update last October (2017) we travelled to New Zealand from Scotland. I took 6 bottles of glucojuice and some boxes of glucogel, and a big pot of glucotabs and jellybeans (The JellyBean Factory does a handy 100g tube). The gel and juice must be bagged up in plastic bags (I was given ziplock freezer bags at customs but it's better if you have your own). You might as well keep them in the plastic bags as you will have to present them for inspection each time you go through security. They will take the glucojuice away and weigh it, then give it back. I reserved the glucojuice for our long haul travel only and used gel or tablets the rest of the time. This time around we managed his BG better. The big problem is when getting off the flight and cabin pressure is no longer affecting the insulin and levels come crashing down. Though I prefer glucojuice when traveling it is a bit weighty so gel is probably the way to go.

    PS Glucojuice is available on prescription. Comes in a box of 12 bottles. If you aren't offered it ask, and make sure they give you the box of 12 because our GP originally prescribed 1 bottle!

    PPS Since our last trip there is more available then just the glucose tablets. They have sports gel packs but I don't know if they are suitable for kids. At least there seemed to be a bit more variety. Glucojuice can be ordered online in NZ but it ships from the UK and is quite expensive over there.
     
    #9 MummyX3, May 9, 2018 at 10:25 AM
    Last edited: May 9, 2018
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