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Has anyone here been a diabetic for more than 40 years?

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by BOHDE, Jun 10, 2014.

  1. masonbason63

    masonbason63 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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  2. masonbason63

    masonbason63 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Sorry clicked the wrong button I think I reposted my old quote (good fun not being able to see very well, funny this my daughter asked yesterday “you should get a medal for being diabetic” crumbs she was so surprised when I told her you do at 50 years I’ll be actually 43years on the dot New Years Eve.
    So only 7more years till me medal
     
  3. Fairygodmother

    Fairygodmother Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    T1 for 48 + years though now 49 years since symptoms first appeared, it wasn’t so well known back in 1969. Diagnosed when I was 20. No complications yet, despite the early years of wee tests, wondering later on what results to put on the empty record, lots of partying in the early carefree days, exciting travelling, and a few hair raising journeys. Very pleased that I did it all!
     
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  4. rochari

    rochari Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    You're right John, diabetes it isn't all smiles for everyone. I wish you the best and hope things get a wee bit better for you.

    Bill
     
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  5. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Moderator
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    I've probably posted on this thread before ...but...

    48 years T1 with mediocre (HbA1cs in 7-8 range mostly, but probably much worse for the first 12 years pre blood testing meters).

    Just had a chat with my new (experienced) diabetic consultant.

    She promised me that I would never go blind, lose kidney function or have an amputation.

    Her only concern was hypos and she was happy for me to run my blood sugars significantly higher (6-10 before meals).

    I'm expecting to get flamed for this but I can see her point (48 years without diabetic complications versus death via hypo).

    T1 is NOT the same as T2.
     
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  6. NoKindOfSusie

    NoKindOfSusie Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't have a go at you but I think your consultant may be a bit mad. I guess it depends on how old you are now and how long you expect to live (sorry but it's true) versus how long it will be before problems start. And how you feel about risk.

    How does the consultant know that you won't get problems? Basically nobody knows that, we've all been told it's random after a certain point, some people have an hba1c in the low 40s and get problems so how can anyone say that.

    I'm sure she was happy for you to be high a lot, it's not her health that will suffer!
     
  7. therower

    therower Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Great post EllieM. I suspect your new consultant is now even more experienced after meeting you.
    48 yrs out trumps my 27.
    As much as we can learn from consultants, DSN's and "experts " it's the real life type 1's like yourself who can teach us so much.
     
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  8. Richmavdog

    Richmavdog Type 1 · Newbie

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    I was diagnosed in 1960, I am 71 years old today. Not been easy but I haven’t really suffered any complications. Novorapid and Lantus now can’t remember all the various mixes of insulin I’ve been on over the years.
     
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  9. rochari

    rochari Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I think, NoKindofSusie, the type of conversation Ellie had with her consultant happens more than you might imagine. I understand where both Ellie and her consultant are coming from and I had much the same conversation with mine.

    Now 55 years on insulin here and no diabetic complications apart from diabetic cheiroarthropathy in one hand and 'normal' arthritis in the other. This means I have a huge problem using an insulin pen. The only place I can inject is my tummy and I'd give anything to use other sites but physically it isn't possible. My tummy is full of lumps therefore the insulin doesn't release as it should and my HbA1c is way, way too high.

    My consultant at the last visit just nodded and said that after 55 years without any major diabetic problems he was not concerned about the high HbA1c. What he also said, and I did understand, was that 'we professionals have to balance things out sometimes'. Unlike Ellie, I was given no promises for the future but I wasn't expecting any.

    Also, I have stopped looking to the future and what is ahead because I have at least got to this stage when many, many others didn't and know that life as a diabetic as different for each an everyone of us. I figure, thankfully, that my consultant does too.

    Bill
     
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    #129 rochari, Mar 17, 2018 at 1:10 PM
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2018
  10. yingtong

    yingtong Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    57 years this February and still going strong.This bloody awful diabetes will not get me.Ive fought it nearly all of my life and it will not rule me I will rule it.
     
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  11. nessals946

    nessals946 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    That sounds very similar to the hba1c results i get,diagnosed in 1976 and used the archaic methods that were available at the time but i have had complications,im registered blind and have been for over 20 years.Maybe some people are affected differently even with similar control.
     
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  12. Walter61

    Walter61 Don't have diabetes · Newbie

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    Hello,
    Although I do not have diabetes, I would like to share opinions because I know people and relatives with this disease.
    I feel discouraged in the group and I want to tell all of you that this is not good, discouragement is the food of diabetes, we must continue strong and forward.
    The answer is yes, I know people who have had diabetes for many years and continue working, they just followed some instructions to improve their lifestyle and reverse the process, click on my nick name and you will see all these details of what I mean ; I hope that, like many I have referred to you, it will be useful to you too.
     
  13. prancer53

    prancer53 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    It was 57 years last month, with diabetes, no complications so far. Diabetes is a pain in the backside but it has never stopped me doing anything. My Mother sent me to ballet lessons to "keep the sugar down" and at 16 I auditioned successfully for a place at a professional ballet school. The intensity and long hours of training meant I needed to lower my insulin consistently until I was taking very little otherwise it was impossible to get to the end of each 90 minute class due to hypos. Any day that I didn't do classes I needed to go back to my normal doses. Working in the theatre with daily classes, rehearsals and performances also kept blood sugar low. When I stopped dancing I worked in advertising for 10 years, hours were long and it involved a lot of driving and staying in hotels. I had 2 children (7lbs and 6lbs 7 ozs so diabetes didn't affect their birth weights). At 47 I was accepted for a dance degree and graduated at 50. I then did post graduate teacher training at The Royal Academy of Dance in London, for a year, and worked as a teacher until my very recent retirement at 64 1/2. As a qualified teacher I was also accepted to organise and deliver youth activities on the Queen Mary 2 and Britannia during school holidays (the photo on the left was during a visit to Tenerife on the Britannia, 2 years ago). Now I have retired I have enrolled for more ballet classes as I will have the time to enjoy them once more as well as "keep the sugar down".
     
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    #133 prancer53, Mar 20, 2018 at 6:46 PM
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2018
  14. prancer53

    prancer53 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    57 years for me also---I also like to think I control my diabetes, not it, me!!!!
     
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  15. prancer53

    prancer53 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    .......and mine.......
     
  16. Fairygodmother

    Fairygodmother Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Me too, it seems that physicians think that if we’ve survived ok for this long then we’ll be fine! I’ve come to the conclusion that survival complication free’s a more complex matter than bs alone.
     
  17. prancer53

    prancer53 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    My Mum wanted me to go but I hated the thought so refused....think she only wanted a well deserved rest, she used to worry so much about me and the diabetes too
     
  18. prancer53

    prancer53 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    My Mum & brother used to eat Mars Bars after lunch and I had to just sit and watch them....still it got me used to just watching others and doing without, I suppose.....
     
  19. prancer53

    prancer53 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Can remember the "potato the size of a hen's egg" description and all the exchanges I had to learn. I was allowed as much butter and fat as I wished because I had gone down to 2 stone, at aged 8, when I was admitted to hospital and it seemed virtually impossible to put on much weight ever, until I was 14 anyway. Was told I would only need to be careful with fatty food if I put on too much weight.
     
  20. prancer53

    prancer53 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Can remember being hungry all the time and kids at school, when I was 11, telling me that I looked as though my Mum didn't feed me.........
     
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