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Have I fixed my IPS with hard exercise?

Discussion in 'Reactive Hypoglycemia' started by Mimi2017, Jun 21, 2021.

  1. Mimi2017

    Mimi2017 Don't have diabetes · Member

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    Hi All, just in case this helps anyone with what I think is IPS (diagnosed as such and many symptoms fit) after 6 years of trying everything I think I might have accidentally hit on the fix! All the tinkering with carbs, diet, restricting diet to foodstuffs I know haven’t caused issues (usually) hasn’t really worked but now suddenly I have no symptoms and am starting to be able to eat anything. It’s bliss. What happened? I have started to look after a couple of horses, on my own, and in the process upped my exercise by about a 1000%! It’s literally hard manual labour all day long…with breaks for food and drinks. Luckily I love it. Im constantly beetling about the yard, lifting, sweeping, grooming, shovelling and cleaning almost all day for the last 3 weeks. Im not young and it’s been very hard as wasn’t fit at all I now realise. But oh so worth it to feel good every day. Once I realised the connection with my increased exercise I googled it and found scientific research papers that exercise alters our blood sugar and insulin levels a lot…along with many other bodily systems. What it doesn’t say is how much exercise so I never would have twigged exactly how much was required to reset the system. By the way, the paper I read also found that the effect of this exercise lasts 24 hours but I’m at it everyday morning til night almost so I can predict the answer is a constant large amount of exercise daily.

    I realise not everyone can do the amount I’m currently doing….jobs, disabilities, responsibilities…..but I wanted to share what feels like a breakthrough with you in case you can give it a go, if even for a week, and see it it helps.
     
  2. Ronancastled

    Ronancastled Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Getting a CGM, even a one off for 2 weeks, really opened my eyes to the effect of exercise on BG.
    It was like a rolling pin on the graph, smoothed out & reduced spikes considerably.
     
  3. Mimi2017

    Mimi2017 Don't have diabetes · Member

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    Interesting! Hard exercise has never been mentioned to me before by medical profession and to be fair I wouldn’t have realised how hard and prolonged it needed to be. Can you tell me what CGM stands for? Thx
     
  4. Ronancastled

    Ronancastled Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  5. In Response

    In Response Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    CGM is a Continuous Glucose Monitor.
    To the purists, Libre is not a CGM but as it takes your blood sugar every 5 minutes, you get great data from it without having to prick your finger that often.
    It is not perfect but brilliant to understand trends.

    What is "IPS"?
    Google has provided me with lots of suggestions but I know you are not referring to Independent Power Systems, Institute for Planetary Synthesis, Iran Press Service, In-Plane Switching, Interacting Particle Systems, Image Processing System, Internet Protocol Suite, Iraqi Police Service, ...
     
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    #5 In Response, Jun 21, 2021 at 10:49 AM
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2021
  6. catinahat

    catinahat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  7. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    In my experience, like yourself, I was very busy working and travelling around the country, doing my job 5 or 6 days a week, on my feet from dawn to dusk and more.
    I was still doing Keto, ignoring carbs and doing inntermittent fasting. A heavy workload and along with walking, lifting, bending, on my fit bit, I was doing an average of 20000 steps a day.
    However, I was fit and healthy, but though the symptoms went, I was still vulnerable to do too much and eating the wrong foods. No cure but able to control better.
    This is where you are.

    Take care.
     
  8. Mimi2017

    Mimi2017 Don't have diabetes · Member

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    Thanks for your response. From your reply it would seem to confirm that my lack of symptoms is indeed related to hard physical work. At least I know the fix now….whether it’s sustainable going forward is another unknown. Given we know the probable fix, does this help work out what is actually wrong with us?! Why it happens, what organ or process is not working? Just would be interested to know
     
  9. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    Good question.
    The symptoms you are getting relate to the rollercoaster ride of your blood glucose levels.
    You wake up with your blood glucose levels in fasting levels, which is more than likely in normal levels, hence along with Hba1c normal levels, which confirms the non diabetic levels you are at before your first meal.
    You have breakfast, which unless it doesn't have carbs, but something like cereal for instance or toast or porridge, that is what I was recommended. No milk or sugar because i am lactose intolerant from a youngster.
    After the meal, your glucose levels go up rapidly because your first insulin response over time, if you are like me, weak and not enough to stop the surge. I have been known to go from normal levels to mid teens,. Then something to and from your brain sends a signal, I have heard that it is called by some as the gut brain trigger, this signal is telling your pancreas to get more insulin into your blood to counter the high glucose. This is called the overshoot. And what this secondary insulin response does is push your blood glucose levels down into hypoglycaemia or the symptoms of having a hypo. So by mid morning you are getting more signals to have more carbs because of the symptoms, you lack energy and you feel tired and more.
    So it is normal to have something and as you are likely to have carbs even a snack bar to tie you over to lunch, what you are actually doing is putting in more glucose, and your glucose levels go up again, you have another spike and trigger the overshoot again. You have the symptoms of hypoglycaemia.
    By this time it's the afternoon and you have eaten again, lunch is a quick sandwich, more carbs, more spikes and more insulin overshoot, more symptoms. Then around dinner you have potatoes with your protein and it starts again, then because of the craving for more carbs, you may indulge in a supper.
    This constant rollercoaster ride of blood glucose levels, up, down, up, down all day long is as you would appreciate is not recommended for your health, the longer you persist with carbs, tolerate the symptoms, the worse your health will be. This consistency of too much glucose, then too much insulin will have a major impact on your endocrine system and organs over time.
    You have an intolerance to certain foods mainly carbs, to treat the condition, go Keto and I would recommend intermittent fasting.
    Remaining in normal levels is essential to a healthy life for me. And it works.
    Yes, working will help because we need to keep to a certain level of exercise per day, and it does occur that too much strenuous exercise can cause the same symptoms.
    So, now that I'm retired I do most of the cooking cleaning garden and shopping.
    I also have a rule that helps maintain normal blood levels. Fifteen minutes after eating, I go for a walk for fifteen minutes. It helps digestion and does just enough to help with control. This along with all the chores is keeping my health really good and no hypos. And no symptoms.
    It is not only working, but doing the work helps, but because it is related to food, I believe it is necessary to find how intolerant you are, by testing before and after meals, just to discover how intolerant you are.
    Your insulin response is the culprit, and if you have insulin resistance and if your insulin can't link to the glucose, the insulin you produce has to go somewhere. And too much insulin is really bad.
    How you got where you are now, I don't know, there are many reasons for it.

    Keep safe and keep asking.
     
  10. Mimi2017

    Mimi2017 Don't have diabetes · Member

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    Excellent helpful reply …thank you. Can I ask how I test my glucose at home please? Should I ask GP or is there an OTC purchase? Also picked up these research papers on chromium from IPS Facebook group. Very interesting. https://europepmc.org/article/MED/9322187
     
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  11. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    I had a glucometer before diagnosis and continued to use it.
    My endocrinologist insisted that my GP provide one because he needed data on how food effects me. In other words, my endocrinologist said it was essential that I kept a food diary. I still do.
    You can get one from your GP, endo or you can buy one. I will tag @Rachox , or @Brunneria , who will give you the information you need.

    I have never trusted the Facebook platform for advice, there are some that have an agenda, and post misinformation.

    Also because of all the testing I have had, the need for supplements are unnecessary, I don't believe that I have any deficiencies to warrant using supplements.
    I take enough tablets,.

    Stay safe, keep asking.
     
  12. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    Hi @Mimi2017 , thanks for the tag @Lamont D


    Here’s some info on UK meters, and to be clear I have no commercial connections with any of the companies mentioned.


    Home Health have recently bought out the Gluco Navii, but I haven’t heard any reviews yet, links to strips and the meter:

    https://homehealth-uk.com/all-produ...ose-meter-test-strips-choose-mmol-l-or-mg-dl/

    There are also discount codes for when you come to buy more strips - "navii5" and "navii10" will give you 20% off purchases of 5 packs of strips and 25% off 10 packs of strips respectively.


    Disclaimer, I haven’t used the discount codes that I have quoted recently so I don’t know if they are still current.





    Spirit Healthcare have a meter called the Tee2 + found here:



    https://shop.spirit-health.co.uk/co...e2-blood-glucose-meter?variant=19264017268793

    with the strips found here:



    https://shop.spirit-health.co.uk/co...py-of-tee2-test-strips?variant=19264017367097

    Some members have got a free Tee2+ by phoning up to order, with a large order of strips they often throw the meter in for free:

    Phone number 0800 8815423


    With more expensive strips is their Caresens Dual which I currently use, this one has the advantage of glucose and ketone testing in one machine, it’s to be found here:

    https://shop.spirit-health.co.uk/collections/caresens-dual





    Don’t forget to check the box if you have pre diabetes or diabetes so you can buy VAT free. (for all meters and strips)
     
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  13. Mimi2017

    Mimi2017 Don't have diabetes · Member

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    Wow, thanks. Super info and links. I will look further into them. And thanks @Lamont D.
     
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