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Type 2 Having A Corn Surgically Removed???

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by nannoo_bird, Aug 17, 2018.

  1. nannoo_bird

    nannoo_bird · Well-Known Member

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    Hi everyone. My chiropodist has told me that I have a deep corn on my foot that has to be removed with a scalpel, and then dressed, as it is an invasive treatment. As a T2 who takes insulin and has PN in my feet, I am really worried about complications - my mother, also a diabetic, had a toe amputated after invasive foot treatment. Am I worrying for nothing, or should I try a less invasive alternative? Would really appreciate any input.
     
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  2. Indy51

    Indy51 Type 2 · Expert

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    I'd be seeing a specialist diabetes foot clinic for a second opinion.
     
  3. hankjam

    hankjam Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    I had one done by my podiatrist, though it was just scrapping the hard callused skin away with a scalpel. It didn't need a dressing afterwards. It is/was on the side of my foot off the little toe. Told him I was a T2 and he was okay to go ahead, so we did. I would go back and ask again as to what the outcomes of the treatment are likely to be.
    Hope this helps and good luck.
     
  4. Indy51

    Indy51 Type 2 · Expert

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    I recall Dr Bernstein saying when he worked at a hospital diabetes foot clinic, almost all amputations originated from too aggressive attempts at removal of hard skin. Especially being on insulin, I would not trust anyone without more than one opinion, and preferably a specialist diabetes HCP second opinion.
     
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  5. nannoo_bird

    nannoo_bird · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you all. Glad I asked!! I live in an area of the country that is years behind in the treatment of diabetes - our local hospital's diabetic section has a food chart on the wall that STILL says white carbs should be included in your diet!!

    How else could I treat this corn?
     
  6. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    Soaking in warm water and then applying warm olive oil and massaging the whole foot might be a gentler way to deal with it - and also look at your footwear. If your shoes are loose then the friction of your feet moving inside them could be the cause of the corn. Consider innersoles which are meant to reduce the impact of hard surfaces, or new shoes with cushioned soles.
    Do start with a fresh unopened supply of olive oil, and be careful to tip out a small amount and then recap the bottle to keep it sterile, do not return unused oil to the bottle or put a pad on the neck and tip the bottle.
    This is a genuine old wives remedy - there were a lot of midwives and nurses in my father's family and they knew a thing or two about keeping people alive and well. They would have recommended a crochet woolen innersole, but we have moved on since then.
     
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  7. nannoo_bird

    nannoo_bird · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you Resurgam. Since diagnosed T2 many years ago, I have been so careful with my feet. I only buy good quality wide leather lined shoes with a wide toe box, and change my shoes at least twice a day - I have about 30 pairs!!.

    The corn has grown due to my bad gait caused by a broken toe years ago.

    Does the warm olive oil treatment actually remove the corn eventually? The chiropodist I saw said that the corn has to be removed surgically as if left untreated, it could ulcerate.
     
  8. JohnEGreen

    JohnEGreen Other · Master

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    To fully resolve a deep seated corn enucleation by a fully trained podiatrist that is one with state registration, by scalpel is the best option and most likely won't even cause any bleeding unless the podiatrist has a very shaky hand that is.
     
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  9. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Expert

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    the corn will return if your foot and gait issues arent addressed. You need to be referred to someone who can make corrective insoles. I am not sure why changing shoes twice a day is happening? I have one pair of shoes and one pair of slippers and that my entire footwear.

    If there is a danger of ulcerated corns, getting the qualified podiatrist to deal with it is the right thing.
     
  10. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    I wonder if your shoes are actually too big as your gait should not be a factor with the corn - a poor gait usually means that your shoes wear unevenly. My sister twists on one foot as she walks and wears out that shoe far faster then the other, and shoes which are too wide for her make blisters. Do you change your shoes because your feet feel hot? That could be heat generated by friction from the movement of your foot inside it.
    Removing hard skin from her feet proved disastrous for my grandmother, so I'd be loath to advise anything but the gentlest and time tested option of softening the corn.
     
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