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HBA1C criteria

Discussion in 'Insulin Pump Forum' started by Peppergirl, Mar 30, 2017.

  1. Peppergirl

    Peppergirl Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi

    Just a quick query. I'm aware of the various hoops to jump through to get a pump and funding depending on specific ccg etc. Just wondering if anyone whose hba1c results have been within range who still managed to get a pump. I know each situation is more complex but if there is some hope for me I'd be pleased. If the consultant takes a look at my results and rules me out straightaway I'll be so disappointed.

    Thanks
     
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  2. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Expert
    Retired Moderator

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    Hey @Peppergirl Actually if your HbA1c is within range you stand a very good chance, they can see you work hard at managing so you are more likely to make a success of managing a pump, the last thing they want to do is give it to someone who is half hearted about their management who will waste the opportunity. They are prepared to help those who help themselves, so keeping within range is a really good thing, on the flipside they also take notice of those who do try very hard but fall short of achieving a good HbA1c as again they can see they will also make the effort required to make this a success and know that the pump would ultimately give them better control, so don't take it as a given that you are judged on your HbA1c result alone, lots of other factors are taken into consideration ;)
     
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  3. novorapidboi26

    novorapidboi26 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Its not so much about the HbA1c but rather the effort currently being put in and the presence of issue that a pump would help with like insulin sensitivity, dawn phenomenon etc....

    so as long as you pro active in your approach, so adjusting your own doses, counting carbs, eating moderate carb amounts, your half way there....
     
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  4. Peppergirl

    Peppergirl Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the responses, gives me hope!
     
  5. Medusa41

    Medusa41 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Peppergirl - I agree with what others have posted. My HBA1C wasn't too bad & I got a pump last April. My HBA1C is now lower & I have far fewer hypos. Good luck.
     
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  6. paulliljeros

    paulliljeros Other · Well-Known Member

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    I accidentally got my A1c within range whilst in the process of requesting a pump, but was able to justify I had only managed this by sugar surfing. The number of injections I was taking (between 8 and 10 injections per day) meant it was impacting my life, and would not have been manageable long term. If you read the NICE guidelines there are numerous justifications available.
     
  7. CapnGrumpy

    CapnGrumpy Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Have a look at http://www.inputdiabetes.org.uk/alt-insulin-pumps/is-it-provided-by-the-nhs/ It's not just HbA1c that's important - you can push the quality of life angle, and do - and make your argument fit more than one criterion.

    Talking numbers - 45 mmol/mol pre-pump, I self funded one for a while and pushed it down to 36 mmol/mol. The NHS generally doesn't approve of my approach, but a decent HbA1c doesn't exclude you.
     
  8. Snapsy

    Snapsy Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Peppergirl ,

    Mine was 42 when I approached my clinic about the pump. I was only achieving that HbA1c by treating my diabetes management as a full-time job, at the expense of a normal life. That was a good reason for them to offer me a pump.

    :)
     
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  9. Peppergirl

    Peppergirl Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Snapsy

    Thank you. I'm going down that route too. Definitely feels like a full time job at the moment. I'm also going to raise my shift work..
     
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  10. Dan87

    Dan87 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    My last HBA1C was 38 and the consultant began discussing the pump, I didn't even bring it up. However I had been talking about my lifestyle - 40 hour job (pretty standard actually I guess), plus playing football 2-3 times a week, and having some hypos shortly after exercise. I think I will need to discuss this angle, how active I am etc. when I have my meeting with the nurse.
     
  11. bethgriff

    bethgriff Type 3c · Member

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    Shift work is one of the criteria :) I'm just starting on a pump and the 3 of us on the course are all shift workers (in the NHS ironically).
     
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