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HbA1c result help

Discussion in 'Prediabetes' started by Nikki365, Apr 8, 2018.

  1. Nikki365

    Nikki365 Prediabetes · Member

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    Hi,
    I’m new here, I had a HbA1c taken couple weeks ago, I had gestational diabetes, and I also have pcos, I was told I’m prediabetic result 47, does this mean I will develop t2?
    I been feeling so tired particularly in the afternoon, very thirsty and wee a lot at night.
    I’m seeing a diabetic nurse next week, will they do another test? Can the HbA1c result be incorrect or change, is there a better test that will confirm prediabetes or t2

    Many thanks
    Nikki
     
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  2. urbanracer

    urbanracer Type 1 · Expert
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    Hi and welcome to the forums,

    You are at the top end of the pre-diabetic range, take a look at this for more info.
    https://www.diabetes.co.uk/what-is-hba1c.html

    The good news is that you have an opportunity to do something about it.

    I will ask @daisy1 , to give you some info. In the meantime, try to reduce your intake of carbohydrates as they all turn into glucose in the body.

    Take a look around the forums and please do ask questions.
     
  3. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    I think that it isn't inevitable that you will go on to develop type two diabetes as my Hba1c was 91 at diagnosis, dropped to 47 by the second test and then to 41 at the third. I don't need tablets, I just avoid high carb foods.
    You might always have to watch the amount of carbs you eat - but with luck you'll never cross into diabetic numbers
     
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  4. Nikki365

    Nikki365 Prediabetes · Member

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    Thank you I will certainly be looking around the site for more info and asking plenty of questions.

    @Resurgam so you was actually diagnosed with t2? You have done well to get those numbers down!
    Im worried about how easy this will be, im on a very low budget, i just don’t know what to eat
     
  5. JoycieW

    JoycieW · Active Member

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    Hi there, don't despair. I was in your position. Gestational diabetes 20 years ago and diagnosed with T2D 2 years ago. Please have a look at diabetes.co.uk to change your diet and control your blood glucose levels. I reduced my HbA1c down to 34. It takes will power but it is so worth to get your health back.
     
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  6. Nikki365

    Nikki365 Prediabetes · Member

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    Is the hbac1 certain that I am pre-diabetic ?
    Would a fasting test give a different result?
     
  7. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend

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    @Nikki365

    Hello Nikki and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. Ask as many questions as you want and someone will be able to help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEW MEMBERS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 235,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:
    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. Most of these are free.

    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why

    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
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  8. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    I was - with a Hba1c of 91, full blown diabetic.
    You might need to be a bit innovative with your menus - some low carb meal suggestions involve high cost meat and fish, but I use chicken thighs at under 2 pounds per Kg rather than chicken fillets and look out for marked down salads, buy berries frozen so there is no waste.
    I also eat only early and late as that seems to keep my numbers steady. I don't need to buy food to eat out of the house.
     
  9. Alison Campbell

    Alison Campbell Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Welcome to the forum, loads of us pre-d's fighting to stay healthy about the forum

    Sorry to say 47 is definately prediabetic and at the top end. You can be diagnosed with Type 2 with two HBA1C at 48 and above. Fasting blood tests rarely used to diagnose these days as it is not reliable.

    Have a look at this

    https://www.diabetes.co.uk/what-is-hba1c.html
    About halfway down the section "HBA1C in diagnosis."

    It sounds like this is a shock for you, do read around the forum and ask questions.
     
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  10. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    Yes, according to that single HbA1c test, you are pre-diabetic and on the very edge of being diabetic.

    under 42 is non-diabetic
    42 to 47 is pre-diabetic
    48 and above is diabetic.

    However, because you were borderline, you will most likely be given another HbA1c to confirm matters.
    Fasting makes absolutely no difference - the HbA1c measures your average glucose over the previous 2 to 3 months, so what you ate for breakfast will have zero effect.

    Did you read the link given to you by @urbanracer in the second post on your thread? That will tell you all you need to know
     
  11. Smallbrit

    Smallbrit Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I had GD 12 years ago, and was at pre-diabetic levels (40s) until last year, mainly by eating healthy-ish (not really carb counting, just not really eating pasta and eating brown bread instead of white) and regular exercise. Then I went off the rails with a lot of comfort food eating (biscuits) and no exercise at all and was diagnosed as T2 last year with HBA1C results of 89 and then 76 three months later.

    It was the 76 that surprised me the most, as I'd reverted to eating the same healthy-ish diet I had before and exercising more, but obviously something is different now. I started eating low carb at the end of last year and bought a blood glucose meter to monitor my glucose levels, and the last HBA1C was 48.

    There's people here with loads of experience and individual stories of what they've done - so have a good trawl around the site and the forums!
     
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  12. Nikki365

    Nikki365 Prediabetes · Member

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    Hi
    Yes I had a good read, since the birth of my daughter after gd I have had quite a few tests, even though they have said they were fine, I’ve never known the ranges, my daughter is almost 6.
    I rang for this recent result the receptionist said, my results were normal, it wasn’t till I made an appointment that the doctor told me.
    I’m just wondering how long I’ve been prediabetic. I’m seeing a diabetic nurse Wednesday.
    I’m going to look even more around the site, get ideas on foods to eat on a budget.

    Nikki :)
     
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  13. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    This is the very reason we advise people to ask for a print out of all blood tests. Normal to a receptionist is not the same as normal to you. Print outs are important documents. You need to know exactly where you are. It isn't just blood glucose, it is all the other diabetes-related stuff, cholesterol, lipids (HDL/LDL and triglycerides), liver & kidney functions, plus full blood counts. You are entitled to these. Usually it is just a matter of ringing up and asking for them. In England, most surgeries put test results on-line, so if you are in England you can ask about this and how to register. There is something fairly simiklar in Scotland, but as far as I know, nothing in Wales. If I were you I would get these print outs before your nurse appointment so you can be prepared. If there is anything you don't understand, just ask on here.
     
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  14. tsouza

    tsouza Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Here is a listing of my HbA1c results since my diabetes was first detected in 2005. The rise in values corresponds significantly to the years of increase in "stress" in job and other personal conditions. The diabetic condition was brought on by earlier cardiac problems, starting from childhood rheumatism (while living in India) and problems with mitral valve. I have already undergone a mitral valvotomy in 1982(in Pune, India), and a change of valve more recently in 2015 (in Lisbon).
    Any comments or suggestions from forum members are welcome.

    Jul 2006 -> 6.7 % (146)
    Out 2008 -> 7.4 % (166)
    Abr 2009 -> 7.1 % (157)
    Fev 2009 ->9.3 % (220)
    Nov 2009 ->8.5 %. (197)
    Nov 2010 ->7.9 % (180) Microalbuminuria 119 mg /24 h (<30)
    Dez 2011 ->9.2 % ( 217) Microslbumin 217mg
    Jan 2013 ->9.2 % Microalbuminuria 15 mg
    Mai 2013 ->6.1 % (129)
    Mai 2014 ->6.5 % (140)
    Mar 2016 -> 6.7 % (146)
    Abr 2016 ->7.5 % (169)
    Jun 2017 ->8.1 % (186)
    6 Fev 2018 ->8.1 % (186)
    26 Mar 2018 ->7.4 % (166)
     
  15. Nikki365

    Nikki365 Prediabetes · Member

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    Yes it has been a massive shock!
    I’m still trying to get my head around it, I still think I need a lot of time to think about my life style, I’ve been so naive and ignorant since my daughters pregnancy and gd.. I thought.. I’d never get t2 or even be anywhere near pre diabetic, it’s time to wake up girl and sort myself out.. I have so much against me, pcos and hypothyroidism, just shows really how ignorant and careless I’ve been !
    Time for a change!
     
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  16. gardengnome42

    gardengnome42 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    You have recognised the problem and you can sort it out with all the help from the lovely folk here. And they are so knowledgeable too. In my opinion there is more help from this site than from the NHS although some surgeries are much better than others. Good luck and ask away.
     
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